Eric Valentine tuning drums for recording

RhythmGJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
76
Reaction score
49
Here it is. When he demonstrates the amount of low frequency content he takes out, and where and why, that’s one thing I didn’t do as much as he does until after seeing the video.

Also when he narrowly notches up at a corner of a high pass filter or deep subtractive cut, it brings out the emphasis of an instrument when done with awareness and care. Use your ears!

A lot of people use “EQ carving.” The other concept you are talking about, I’m going to guess, is “Air EQ,” or EQing outside the range of human hearing (but which effects adjacent frequencies that we can hear). But of course I will have to watch to find out. Thank You for posting the link!!!


GJ
 

TPC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
347
Reaction score
397
Location
San Pablo, CA
Here it is. When he demonstrates the amount of low frequency content he takes out, and where and why, that’s one thing I didn’t do as much as he does until after seeing the video.
I started doing this when a bandmate who was a very good engineer suggested it. He said that "there's only so much sonic space, so you need to make the most room for the most important sounds." A revelation.
 

Tornado

DFO Veteran
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
1,936
Reaction score
1,612
Location
Dallas
Here it is. When he demonstrates the amount of low frequency content he takes out, and where and why, that’s one thing I didn’t do as much as he does until after seeing the video.

Also when he narrowly notches up at a corner of a high pass filter or deep subtractive cut, it brings out the emphasis of an instrument when done with awareness and care. Use your ears!

Crazy the amount of work it takes to get the kick sound he's looking for.
 

Cauldronics

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
5,252
Reaction score
282
Location
SF Bay Area
A lot of people use “EQ carving.” The other concept you are talking about, I’m going to guess, is “Air EQ,” or EQing outside the range of human hearing (but which effects adjacent frequencies that we can hear). But of course I will have to watch to find out. Thank You for posting the link!!!


GJ
The carving part is widely known and a standard way of shaping a sound, but that’s just part of what I meant. After removing excess lows with a “downward bell” (or Q shape) on a kick drum, for example, EV showed how he then boosts a frequency right at the edge of that bell so that there is still some punch and oomph. Where and how much he boosts depends on what he hears that brings that power back.

It’s harder to explain in words but he does it in the video and then it makes perfect sense. Even better is that you can hear it when it happens. The best part is it works for any instrument, not only drums.

trout, sorry to have sidetracked your thread, although this is closely related to the topic.
 

Cauldronics

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
5,252
Reaction score
282
Location
SF Bay Area
The Air eq you mention isn’t part of this but I know what you mean. An mix engineer might boost 20 kHz and it can arguably have a clearing or lifting effect, even if it’s thought to be outside the range of human hearing.
 

RhythmGJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
76
Reaction score
49
The carving part is widely known and a standard way of shaping a sound, but that’s just part of what I meant. After removing excess lows with a “downward bell” (or Q shape) on a kick drum, for example, EV showed how he then boosts a frequency right at the edge of that bell so that there is still some punch and oomph. Where and how much he boosts depends on what he hears that brings that power back.

It’s harder to explain in words but he does it in the video and then it makes perfect sense. Even better is that you can hear it when it happens. The best part is it works for any instrument, not only drums.

trout, sorry to have sidetracked your thread, although this is closely related to the topic.
The Air eq you mention isn’t part of this but I know what you mean. An mix engineer might boost 20 kHz and it can arguably have a clearing or lifting effect, even if it’s thought to be outside the range of human hearing.

They go hand in hand. “Air EQ” is upper freqs, but affects adjacent freqs. Same is true anywhere though, with a parametric and enough of a wide Q.


GJ
 

troutstudio

Idealist
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
4,142
Reaction score
425
Location
South of the border
I was listening mainly for mixing and recording tips. I've been tuning my toms the same way for 20 years. I decided to give his method a try last night. I couldn't really do it exactly the same because I have different sizes so I ended up going for:
1. slack off the bottom head and lift the pitch evenly to a note that's in the song and tighter than usual. Not crazy tight, just higher - more like a top head. This was a D on a 10" tom (as someone mentioned here already - thanks)
2. slack off the top head completely then raise the pitch until the drum sort of rings together nicely - this did in fact turn out to be a 4th away but I wasn't sweating that.
I don't get many "wow" moments in the studio these days on the drums but this was one of them. I can't believe how different toms sound tuned this way. I did this on the Sakae and they just took off. Haven't tried the snare yet but I might as well.
I respect Valentine a lot and he gets great sounds, although I'm not into that type of drum sound with the single mic/room mic. That doesn't change the fact that these are very detailed, patient and well presented videos made for free - I really think that's a very cool thing to do. You can pick out the ideas that work for you. Even just pushing down on the centre of the head for tuning from slack; and using the end of the key to test the pitch at the lugs - sounds crazy but I found even those ideas very useful. I don't worry about threads wandering around that's a good conversation if we are all trying to help each other and the respect is there.
 

Browny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
245
Reaction score
205
Location
Melbourne
I was listening mainly for mixing and recording tips. I've been tuning my toms the same way for 20 years. I decided to give his method a try last night. I couldn't really do it exactly the same because I have different sizes so I ended up going for:
1. slack off the bottom head and lift the pitch evenly to a note that's in the song and tighter than usual. Not crazy tight, just higher - more like a top head. This was a D on a 10" tom (as someone mentioned here already - thanks)
2. slack off the top head completely then raise the pitch until the drum sort of rings together nicely - this did in fact turn out to be a 4th away but I wasn't sweating that.
I don't get many "wow" moments in the studio these days on the drums but this was one of them. I can't believe how different toms sound tuned this way. I did this on the Sakae and they just took off. Haven't tried the snare yet but I might as well.
I respect Valentine a lot and he gets great sounds, although I'm not into that type of drum sound with the single mic/room mic. That doesn't change the fact that these are very detailed, patient and well presented videos made for free - I really think that's a very cool thing to do. You can pick out the ideas that work for you. Even just pushing down on the centre of the head for tuning from slack; and using the end of the key to test the pitch at the lugs - sounds crazy but I found even those ideas very useful. I don't worry about threads wandering around that's a good conversation if we are all trying to help each other and the respect is there.
Was the 'wow' moment due to the particular tuning approach (including top:bottom relationship) or was it more to do with the connection to the song (ie that D note on the 10" you referenced).
 

Latest posts



Top