Extreme Drum Triggers

Luddite

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I'm considering converting my Ludwig Epic X-Over Striped kit into an e-kit for church. Here's a link to what I'm talking about: http://www.extremedrums.com/. I'm intrigued by the Extreme triggers and am considering getting them and some mesh heads for the kit. Anyone here try them?
 

stickinthemud

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I have not tried them, but am familiar with the principals that make them work. At the heart of the vast majority of triggers out there is an inexpensive (about $1.50 or so when bought in bulk) piezoelectric disc. These generate a low-level voltage when tapped which the module interprets to trigger a sample resident in the module, or in a VST program on a computer. Anyone with a simple home workshop can make them themselves with satisfactory results if they have the time and patience to work out the kinks. That being said, it's nice that Mr. Rinker has put together a system with instructions to save one the time and trouble of gathering materials and re-inventing the wheel, or trigger as the case may be.

I expect they will probably work as well or better than a lot of the clip-on type triggers for single-zone drums (one sound, no positional sensing, no rim shots or rim clicks). Although they have a dual-zone solution, it differs in nature from that of other manufacturers, and performance may or may not be the same.

They don't offer any cymbal triggers, but they do give some very good advice which I would sum up as follows: Buy high-grade cymbals from Roland or Yamaha, depending on which module you plan to use. While some of the cymbal pads are cross-platform compatible, the hihats are generally not. There are some DIY cymbal and hihat solutions out there, but they can be spotty, particularly with the hihat, and a factory-made rubber pad, such as the Roland or Yamaha cymbals, will generate less noise and be more playable and dependable.

Mesh heads can be a little tricky as well. The main complaint is they have a "springy" feel, a little hyper-bouncy, when compared to regular mylar heads. The two-ply Roland heads are a bit better, but still not the same as a regular drum head. This is a reality of mesh heads, so be prepared to adapt.

In the end, it's the cymbals that are going to cost you. You may want to look at buying a used kit and seeing how that works for you, because the cost of the drum pads is probably going to be the same or less than the cost of the Extreme triggers (talking rubber pads here). If you must have a "real" set of drums on the stage, keep the cymbals and module and sell off the rest of the gear. This will almost certainly be less costly in the long run over buying a module and cymbals ala carte.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
 

Luddite

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Thanks for the reply, stick. Actually, I'll be using the cymbals, module and hi-hat controller from the Roland TD4 KX2 that I'm playing at church. The pads on it are able to be tensioned like a regular drum so I was able to get them to where they were comfortable to me pretty quickly. My main motivation here is being tired of the teeny-tiny drum pads. I need more real estate to aim for when I'm flailing away and my 12/14/22 Epic X-Over kit with 5x14 snare is just the ticket.
 

fun2drum

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I like the concept, and Stickinthemud's comments make good sense. I don't know if I would use it live but for practice at night with the same psychological "feel" as an acoustic set, that kind of thing could be the ticket. I would love to see somebody here do it and review it.
 

stickinthemud

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I do this every so often, and I think this is one of those times it makes sense...

Trot this thread out at Vdrums.com. You will get a lot of very expert advice on this subject, and perhaps even this product in particular.
 

Luddite

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I have---I ordered them last week and received them on Thursday. They're easy to install and work very well. Service and communication by the owner of the company, Marshall Rinker, was excellent. I had the maiden run with them at church Sunday and it went well---so much fun to be playing a real drum kit again with real world sizes instead of the teeny-tiny little pads that go with the territory of most e-kits. I had to do a little fiddling with my Roland module to get the cross stick feature to work, but other than that, setup and installation was a breeze. I recommend them to anyone considering converting an acoustic kit to an e-kit. Price-wise, they're somewhat expensive although less expensive than Roland's triggers. I love the fact that they mount in the interior of the shell and are out of the way.
 

kaosotis

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From everything I've read they are solid. One advantage of the Extreme triggers are they are edge mounted which means you are unlikely to hit them head on (which happens with my DIY one's).

There are other guys out there making stuff too, you can search Ebay. I have homebuilt trigger setups (cross bar with cone trigger) on both a DIY TD9 kit (pads made from cut Tama IMperialstar toms) and also in the conversion of my Tama kit. It's definitely a big upgrade to play regular size toms over the smaller pads.

I have an external RedShot trigger that I tried, and I find the internals work more consistently.

+1 also for getting good quality two ply heads. They are much more natural feeling, and last a long longer, than the cheapo ones.
 

MatrixClaw

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Look interesting, but I have a hard time justifying spending that kind of cash when their website looks so terrible. They seriously need to update that thing...
 

barryjcurtis

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ive read that triggers are better on the rim vs being in the center for large kits. larger heads cause slapback triggering. Haven't tried it personally. but it sounds like it would make a difference.
 


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