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Feelings of elation while playing

peter

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Atypical is a very mild way to put it. But I get where you're coming from. I too have used a cornucopia of substances to help me focus and get over that constant self-judgyness while I was learning how to play music (played guitar and sang for years before picking up the sticks). I used them as an incentive of sorts and as a creativity catalist. I don't recomend it either, but I think it helped me in some aspects, while hindering me in others. Everything comes with a price..

Most of my drumming journey has been through sobriety. And I am grateful that I can still get to a state of grace without chemical assistance.
Thanks for sharing that. I was thinking about my post and realized it's kind of it's own topic. I will start a new discussion.
 

Rock Salad

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Yes, that feeling when it is more like I'm listening to our music than playing it, when the drama of that same old song is fresh at every note.
It's interesting and I wonder what is actually happening- we all have nights of not feeling this synchronicity, but audience reaction and recordings seem to indicate that it was
 

drumstuff66

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Yes, that feeling when it is more like I'm listening to our music than playing it, when the drama of that same old song is fresh at every note.
It's interesting and I wonder what is actually happening- we all have nights of not feeling this synchronicity, but audience reaction and recordings seem to indicate that it was
Pretty much nailed it for me...and I wonder that as well.
 

Fat Drummer

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Man, I understand this 100%. I've not tried to analyze the moments or even want to over think them, but several times I have been so overwhelmed by a musical moment that I have openly wept. It's neither sad nor happy, just a rush of emotions while playing. It's like there is so much trying to get out that it can't all come through the sticks. Those are peculiar moments but I am moved by them every time. I've paid enough attention to notice it's the music it's self that's creating these moments and not the lyrics, picked up on that much at least. I just keep playing and wipe the "sweet" from my eyes!
 

Polska

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I've been feeling that lately in my rock/Americana band. We recently added a new bass player and it's made all the difference in the world. Combine that with all the starts/stops we've had over the last couple years and I simply do not take any gigs for granted any more. Sit down, take a deep breath of gratitude and live in the moment, enjoying the gig.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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Never happened to me. Perhaps I'm not good enough.
It's got nothing to do with how "good" you are or how "good" you aren't. It's about how emotionally involved you get into the music.
Maybe you just haven't met the people with whom to play exactly the right notes to move ya.

Then again, I can get pretty emotional even just listenning to some music. Different people have different thresholds, different emotional triggers.

there surely must be something in it for you to get through the tedious hours of repetition needed to get anywhere in drumming...
 

TonyVazquez

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Never happened to me. Perhaps I'm not good enough.
NEVER doubt yourself.
Modesty and humbleness are fine,
but NEVER say you're not good enough.
You can be as good as you desire,
and let that good jammin feeling
rapture you away. Wing it and Sing it!
Feeling good is the best natural high ever!
:thumbleft:
 

Tornado

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Sometimes I get into a zone, for sure. Not sure if I've had anything on the level of some of you guys, but last weekend the bass player and I were so locked in on a Texas Shuffle that I didn't want it to stop. Probably went on for 10 minutes before the guitarists had enough. Great audience engagement too, seemed like they were as interested in what I was doing as the soloists. It was grooving as hard as I've ever grooved.
 

audiochurch

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I’ll take it a step further: I feel happy and grateful as I set up. Tearing down at the end of the night, I am as grateful that I had an opportunity to rock for an audience. I tend to treat every gig as my last on earth and put all of my soul into every aspect of the gig.
 

CherryClassic

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WoW! Yes, it's a big YES. Hardly know what to say but all of the above is so true. There are those nights when you just have to close your eyes and feel the music, them something seems to take over your soul; you're on a train and you can't jump off, if you do it'll crash. Then we all end together and it's such a relief and a feeling of satisfaction that's hard to explain.

sherm
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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I’ll take it a step further: I feel happy and grateful as I set up. Tearing down at the end of the night, I am as grateful that I had an opportunity to rock for an audience. I tend to treat every gig as my last on earth and put all of my soul into every aspect of the gig.
I do as well!! I really do enjoy setting up.

My band is fortunate enough to have a roadie on payroll, technically for all band gear duties. But I still setup and tear down my drums myself nonetheless.

I love all my kits, no matter wich one is on the gig that day, they all have something special to offer. When the light crew is done with their focussing and before the other band members start firing up their amps, I generally have the stage to myself for about half an hour.

I really enjoy listenning to how the room's acoustics (or the stageline if outdoors) affects the drums' sound and how it interracts with tuning. I love those first few hits when the FOH guy opens up the PA.love to feel the low end rumble and hear the space's natural reverb.

And yeah I feel ridiculously fortunate to be able to play often, to get paid to do it and to have people pay to see me do it... It flabberghasts me each and every time I think about it, so I never forget to always welcome it from a place of gratefulness.

Tear down is somewhat of a decanter moment for me. It comes after the post-show's band debrieffing in the dressing room. What went good, what went so-so, laughing together at some funny event or goof that might have happened...

Aaaand then it's just me and the drums. Putting them back in their cases, wiping any sweat drippings and/or fingerprints off of them, folding the stands legs etc. Putting everything neatly back in their cases or bags. Usually there's almost always at least one of the local techs who is a drummer. I get tons of questions and comments (all of my kits' makes/models are pretty rare sights in my area) and I like the opportunity to geek out about them with curious fellow drums afficionados.

This is all part of the complete show experience. I enjoy all of it and I am absolutely grateful for it all...
 

JazzAcolyte

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I hope the answer is yes for everyone on this forum.
Not yet, for me. I still have to concentrate too hard on mechanics to get into a flow state. No smile on my face - I play with a look of grim concentration, kind of like an undertaker studying an actuarial spreadsheet.

I’m hoping that if I keep working I’ll get there.
 

RIDDIM

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Do you have them?

I do, often.

When I play with others, but sometimes even by myself and/or along to recordings. It's got nothing to do with the complexity of what is being played, it could be a Billie Jean type of beat with just the right feel and bam! Chills... Sometimes I'll get overwhelmed by the intensity of a well executed crescendo and have goose bumps at the back of my neck. Sometimes it happens as I'm just providing some quiet punctuation to some cleverly crafted lyrics.

I have an addictive personality so maybe dopamine hyper sensitivity is a factor... I tend to constantly seek to get back to and over-do anything that gives me a "rush". But dang! does drumming ever feel good.

Truly, some of the most fun I've had, fully clothed and sober. Although some of those non-fully clothed and/or inebriated moments weren't all that great, in retrospect. But that is NOT a discussion for this here forum...
I understand that drumming is fairly new to me (at it seriously only for a few short years) compared to some of you folks. But those who have been at it a long time: do you still get that excitation while playing? That feeling of fulfilment and pure joy?
If we didn't enjoy it, for the most part, why would we do it?
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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Not yet, for me. I still have to concentrate too hard on mechanics to get into a flow state. No smile on my face - I play with a look of grim concentration, kind of like an undertaker studying an actuarial spreadsheet.

I’m hoping that if I keep working I’ll get there.
Your name implies that you are playing jazz, and some (a lot) of it tends to be more complex than the usual backbeat music. Maybe you should treat yourself to some more simple pocket based music once in a while. The hypnotic repetitiveness is very conducive to attaining a flow state. Simple repetitive drum beats have been used for millenia to induce trance and/or jubilation in a bunch of cultures so, IT WORKS ;-)

I know though that the closer I am to playing at my maximum capacity, some more complex stuff where I have to thoroughly think through the relationship between each hit and each limb, the more I get like you described: all furrowed brows and pursed lips and not at all in a state of lighthearted abandon...
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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If we didn't enjoy it, for the most part, why would we do it?
I really do not know, because drums can also be quite frustrating for long periods of time when we are struggling. So if there wasn't any of that "rewarding joy" every now and then, I don't think I could invest the time and ressources necessary to learn how to play half decently.
 


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