First drum clinic you went to and how it affected you

old_K_ride

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
4,750
Reaction score
260
Location
Cincinnati,OH U.S.A.
a Fibes clinic by Alan Dawson on a clear 4pc with an 18".He sang melodies like Night In Tunisia on a mic while playing complex ideas then soloing over the form.It was over my 14 year old head.
I got his autograph.
 

Tornado

DFO Veteran
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
2,008
Reaction score
1,692
Location
Dallas
If I recall correctly, probably Ed Soph in the early 90s. The thing I remember most was just his mastery of time and independence. He had no limitations on what he wanted to play.
 

poco rit.

Active Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
35
Reaction score
28
Location
Texas
Jojo Mayer about 4 years ago.

it affected me by realizing that I probably wouldn’t go to another clinic again. Nothing against Jojo, who is undeniably talented. I just realized I’m not that type of drummer who intently studies other drummers’ technique. My influence comes more from the performance within the context of a song, and the interaction with other instruments. I get more inpspiration watching a band play together.

It probably explains why I wouldn’t be able to put together a logical or impressive drum solo.
Dude i feel you. I too am more interested now in how a drummer plays off of their band mates. Its just when we are younger, we just wanna see something done fast, loud, and difficult. At least thats what i wanted to see. But now im more interested in feel.
 

poco rit.

Active Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
35
Reaction score
28
Location
Texas
I don't think it was my first, but I travelled about 8 hours to Minneapolis to see a Weckl clinic. It was amazing, and I remember him warming up with a practice pad on his knee before he got on, but what I remember the most is the story about how his hands locked up during a show and how he had to learn how to relax his muscles. Anyways, after the clinic I had a chance to meet him, but I was star struck, couldn't muster a word and just had him sign a poster while I mumbled something incoherent. I don't know where that poster is now, probably gone with time. This was towards the end of the 90's.
When you say his hands locked up, do you mean like they cramped up? Did he winch in pain or anything? That must have been embarrassing for Weckl but also a reality check for the audience.
 

hsosdrum

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
303
Reaction score
439
Late 60's, at my first Buddy Rich big band concert, sitting 20 feet out from the band. Make no mistake - it was a clinic. I knew drummers who went through the "sell my drums and quit" thing, at the time. I was the opposite - he inspired me to be my best. Same with Elvin's sax, bass drums trio; Roy Burns with Rogers.
Same exact experience for me. Every one of the 15 or so times I saw Buddy Rich play live was a clinic that left me more inspired than ever to get back on my drums and explore their endless musical possibilities.
 

egw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2007
Messages
228
Reaction score
198
Dave Weckl at Sam Ash in New Haven, CT. If I remember correctly, it was 1994.

As far as how it affected me, I don't know. At that point in my life I was nerding out hard on drums, and was already a Weckl fan, so I guess it was just sort of extra fuel for the fire.
 
Last edited:

dtk

DFO Star
Joined
Oct 6, 2005
Messages
8,726
Reaction score
532
Location
Needham MA...
mine was Alan Dawson too. What I remember was his introduction to odd times. I think he had the crowd clapping in 7 while he soloed. Then he played a beat in such a way that most of the audience lost the 7. What I remember most was how musical (not mechanical) his playing in odd times was. It was musical...not academic which to a kid growing up on new wave (early 80s)...was ear opening.
 

Murat

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jun 22, 2015
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
711
Location
Aurora, Ontario
97 I think, Mike Portnoy in Toronto. Was a big DT fan at the time so seeing him and that massive set was cool. The thing is, I don't remember anything regarding the clinic, except the t shirt I won...
I try to organize at least 2-3 clinics a year at my shop. I love how they bring the drumming community together. People that have a common passion meet other fellow drummers and hopefully have a nice experience.
Clinicians are tricky though...Finding the right balance is the key. Some talk too much when people expect more action. Others say nothing and just keep on playing. Guys I find that found the right balance were Kenny Aronoff, Benny Greb, Larnell Lewis and Aaron Spears.
 

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,081
Reaction score
820
Location
MD
Jojo Mayer about 4 years ago.

it affected me by realizing that I probably wouldn’t go to another clinic again. Nothing against Jojo, who is undeniably talented. I just realized I’m not that type of drummer who intently studies other drummers’ technique. My influence comes more from the performance within the context of a song, and the interaction with other instruments. I get more inpspiration watching a band play together.

It probably explains why I wouldn’t be able to put together a logical or impressive drum solo.
- I'd argue differently. The ability to solo is no more a function of having a vast technical vocabulary than is the ability to answer most questions dependent on having Ph.D in English. If you answer the questions according to a logical analysis of the facts at hand, you'll be fine. Similarly, if you base your solos on the music and the questions it asks, you'll be fine. Neither you nor the audience will get lost. That doesn't mean playing down or dumb - it just means being logical and musical, so folks can sing the form in their heads as you solo. If we're not playing musically, we should not be on the gig.
 
Last edited:

drummingbulldog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2010
Messages
256
Reaction score
165
Location
Jacksonville, FL
Mine was Cobham in 85. He was my hero and I met him & got his autograph. Dom Famularo was there & I think Billy was off. Cobham was still great but they both were trading 8s and I felt like Dom was better that day. Billy is one of my all time favorite drummers & was a huge influence. Dom had a great day. He too is a great drummer. Billy said don't cheat talking about singles over double strokes on the toms. I will always remember that.
 

dsop

Very well Known Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
781
Reaction score
654
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Chester Thompson, I think it was 1977, or thereabouts (I was a massive Genesis fan). He played great, explained some great exercises (I had only been playing for about two years), and mentioned Tony Williams, who I had never heard of. Well, I went out and picked up Believe It! and that changed everything once again.
 

Hop

DFO Veteran
Joined
Feb 11, 2012
Messages
2,241
Reaction score
703
Location
L.A., CA
Simon Phillips ~1981, some forgotten music store in SoCal. Got there a bit early, had a few beers in the parking lot, then got a good viewing spot near the front; unfortunately the clinic got a later than expected start... I was floored by the solo portion - c'mon, it's was Simon Phillips! Great technique, sound, flowing ideas, yes this young man was impressed.

During the Q&A session I had to duck out - you know what they say about beer - you don't really buy it, ya just rent it. Plus I needed to make a phone call to let the ball & chain know I was going to be late (really coulda used a cell technology in that instance). I kid you not it took me about 15-mins to get out of the store it was so jammed packed and nobody wanted to move an inch. I thought I was going to wet my pants before I made it out of the store. Went to a nearby bar to relieve myself and was the happiest guy on earth, then made the called and was turned into the most miserable guy on earth.

Upside, I still have the cassette recording of that clinic tucked away for posterity sake, the woman, I jettisoned.... c'mon, it's was a Simon Phillips clinic!
 

Drums558

New Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Messages
1
Reaction score
1
Location
Utah
First post!!
My first was a Roy Burns drum clinic around 1973-4??
My first concert was Kiss/Peter Criss in 1976!
Mike
 

pgm554

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
219
Reaction score
113
John von Ohlen with Stan Kenton's band at Carnegie Mellon .
The stage band had been playing a lot of his charts and I got to hear how they were meant to be played.
John played Here's to that Rainy Day basically using only mallets.
Got to hear what the 8/8 concept was about too.
Probably a good candidate for best drummer you never heard of.
 

rhythmace

Rhythmace
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
11,321
Reaction score
515
Location
Richmond, Texas
Going way back to '65 when Bobby Rosengarden was with the Tonight Show. Doc, Bobby and a few others came to my hometown for a "Pops" concert. I was in a practice room doing the triplets from snare to small tom and Bobby heard me. Later in his clinic, he totally dogged that in a smart aleck tone. It embarrassed me. Me and a buddy had picked him up at the local airport too. He had a rep for being cocky, but I was 16. Hate to dog another passed drummer, but I always thought that Ed did a lousy job trying to play rock. He was a great drummer, but out of his element on the Tonight Show. Cheers! Ace
P.S. One of the most instructive clinics that I attended was Stanton Moore. He even gave out some written exercises.
 

Latest posts



Top