Fixing tiny woodgrain cracks (Experienced drum restorers advice needed)

cin

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I'm restoring a 60's kit and I found some craquelure going through the inner-most ply of a floor tom. Those tiny cracks don't go through to the second ply, which I believe has the grain running in the other direction. The wood must've dried out a bit too much and it cracked at the grain.

cracks.jpg
I'd like to do the proper thing about these, I'd like you guys's opinion as to my best course of action:

Option 1: Leave it as is. The inner ply is still very solidly laminated to the other plies even where the cracks are. I doubt these would affect the sonic abilities of the drum much. Unmolested vintage drums have their appeal, but I'd like to feel confident it's not going to get worse.

Option 2: Wood filler. Classic 2-parts runny wood epoxy would get in those tiny cracks, hold them together and fill the void in a nice looking way. Not as structurally strong as wood glue though.

Option 3: Wood glue would get right in there and hold it all together in a way that those cracks would likely never grow. But wood glue doesn't look all that good and the repair would be obvious.

Option 4: Wood glue capped with wood filler. I was contemplating diluting a bit of wood glue and injecting it into the cracks, no enough to fill the mini-gaps, just enough to put in a base layer that will hold it all together. Then let it dry and cap it with a tiny amount of wood filler to make the repair look better.

Note that my goal is not to *hide* the repair, but to make it as correct as possible both structurally and aesthetically.

Let me know what you think, or if there's an option I've over looked. Thanks!
 

cin

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My apologies for the bad photo, as you can see there isn't much of a gap to fill, these are tiny, the work will require a magnifying glass and a syringe.
 

burgundy

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unless there were actually pieces that were lifting off I would never touch it, its all part of the aging and seasoning , if you start adding glue or filler you run the risk of it falling out and looks like a repair, fixed or unfixed, you, I, or the next guy will not hear the difference.
 

cin

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Thank for the good advice. That's the easiest and least risky course of action, demanding the least amount of skills on my part. I like that.

I knew I should ask here before touching those sweet oldies. Glad I did.
 

poot

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Agreed, better to leave it as-is.

Here's a good trick for minor ply or re-ring separation at the bearing edge: Mix sawdust into wood glue until it has the texture / appearance of peanut butter. Press it in with your finger or use a syringe for deeper filling. Place a clamp on the area. Wipe off any excess glue with a damp cloth and let it dry overnight. You'll be hard-pressed to find the repaired spot after it dries.
 

lossforgain

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poot said:
Agreed, better to leave it as-is.

Here's a good trick for minor ply or re-ring separation at the bearing edge: Mix sawdust into wood glue until it has the texture / appearance of peanut butter. Press it in with your finger or use a syringe for deeper filling. Place a clamp on the area. Wipe off any excess glue with a damp cloth and let it dry overnight. You'll be hard-pressed to find the repaired spot after it dries.
I feel like I owe you $$ for the great advice!
 

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