Flat Bearing Edges?

deegeebee

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Assuming that that is a narrow flat edge, it looks like the entire edge was sanded on a table to true the edge to a flat plane, if you follow what I’m saying.

That might render an excellent result, but, that’s not what I’m talking about in the OP. I’m talking about the entire width of the shell being flat.
Yeah looks like what was done, after it was laqued. I realize that wasn't exactly what you were talking about, just neat and related, sorry to jack your thread.
 

Matched Gripper

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Yeah looks like what was done, after it was laqued. I realize that wasn't exactly what you were talking about, just neat and related, sorry to jack your thread.
Not at all. I just wanted to clarify. I would think many/most factory 45 degree bearing edges with a countercut would have part of the edge, perhaps one ply, that is flat at the apex of the bearing edges.
 

Stickclick

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I'm concerned that a flat bearing edge causes the drum head to bend at a 90 degree angle at the perimeter. I think that angle is too sharp and stresses the head at the perimeter.
 

RIDDIM

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Absolutely 100% flat and square. No round over whatsoever. These drums made me scratch my head about the whole concept and philosphy of edges.
Did they sound good at all tunings or just at certain ones? I had a Sonor rosewood kit once that only tuned well super low or super high. After edge work, it sang throughout the tuning spectrum. That's what caught my attention on the value of edgework. Ever since, if I've had a kit that didn't sound right, something was off with the edges. Often the edges weren't true - when inverted on a flat surface milled to within a few 10,000 of an inch, and a light bulb was places inside, light leaked out at various points on the bottom.
 

Matched Gripper

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I'm concerned that a flat bearing edge causes the drum head to bend at a 90 degree angle at the perimeter. I think that angle is too sharp and stresses the head at the perimeter.
I don’t think so. An inside cut 45 degree bearing edge, and very thin shelled drums made from fiberglass, carbon fiber, some metal drums, all result in a 90 degree bend of the head. Mylar is very tough and durable.
 

felis

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I'm concerned that a flat bearing edge causes the drum head to bend at a 90 degree angle at the perimeter. I think that angle is too sharp and stresses the head at the perimeter.
That's what causes the restriction in the heads ability to vibrate. When an inner angle is cut, the head can bend down around it.
 

halldorl

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Did they sound good at all tunings or just at certain ones? I had a Sonor rosewood kit once that only tuned well super low or super high. After edge work, it sang throughout the tuning spectrum. That's what caught my attention on the value of edgework. Ever since, if I've had a kit that didn't sound right, something was off with the edges. Often the edges weren't true - when inverted on a flat surface milled to within a few 10,000 of an inch, and a light bulb was places inside, light leaked out at various points on the bottom.
I actually didn´t have them that long to experiment with many different tunings. Low to medium was what I did and they sounded very good. What my experience has taught me is that if the edges are true i.e. 100% flat as you describe, drums in general will sound good. The edge profile is more of a sound adjustment or flavour.
 

RIDDIM

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I actually didn´t have them that long to experiment with many different tunings. Low to medium was what I did and they sounded very good. What my experience has taught me is that if the edges are true i.e. 100% flat as you describe, drums in general will sound good. The edge profile is more of a sound adjustment or flavour.
- Thanks.
 

wayne

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Though not reading through all of this, I assume someone mentioned how crucial the head contact is regarding edges?.. I equate it wearing shoes that are too tight/ or loose...makes a huge difference.
 

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