For Anal Drum Tuners

swarfrat

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Measure with what device
Measuring physical deflection (Drum Dial) is a secondary effect that doesn't guarantee pitch accuracy due to heads and bearing edges mostly. Tunebot measures pitch directly,and is actually helpful in training your ears IMO. All the curmudgeons yelling USE YOUR EARS IDIOTS! Likely had benefit of an experienced ear teaching them when they learned. Most people when they start have trouble hearing the complex overtones in the drum which is enharmonic. It's easy to spend a lot of time chasing what you think you hear only to have it be the opposite lug, or opposite head. Hearing one partial and missing the weaker one below, etc... The old timers didn't learn without benefit of a reference, and you probably won't either. I just find the tunebot a handy reference that is extremely helpful, and the more I used it, the better my ear got.
 

fusseltier

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The crazy thing is that I always tuned by ear, and since there are apps now that can tell you what note you are playing, and i compared my tuning by ear notes to the tune bot free app where you enter the tom sizes and it gives you the notes they should be, and it ended up my tuning by ear notes were exactly what the tune bot app recommended.
How's that for crazy?
 

Zesar

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Not sure about what an anal drum tuner is... also not sure about wanting to know. But who knows, maybe combined with a Pearl THMP-1, a Porter & Davies BC-2 or a Buttkicker it can be useful for some people.
 

Elvis

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I am trying to understand why when I use the DD and tap two lugs (one reads 85 and the one next to it 89)...My question is how can the DD read different numbers when the pitch was the same.
It could very well be that those DD numbers fall within the variance of DD numbers that constitute that pitch.

Elvis
 

rjs1188

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I use an iphone app along with ear. The tune-bot style tuners report a single frequency, but that's selected from typically a wide spectrum of frequencies which may change over time. Some apps have a graphic display which is useful when having trouble or when ear doesn't agree with the readings. Often times when having trouble there are 2 peak frequencies but the bot style app will just pick one to report.
 

GeneZ

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Of which I am one.
I use a Drum Dial, Iphone Pro Tuner, and my pitch perfect ears
I have been experimenting on my 196X supraphonic.

I know how to seat a head and tune a drum.
I am trying to understand why when I use the DD and tap two lugs (one reads 85 and the one next to it 89). The Iphone Tuner reads G# on both (around 197 hz).
My ears read the same. My question is how can the DD read different numbers when the pitch was the same. I hit the drum about the lug about one inch the edge with the same pressure.
I never used to tap the heads while tuning.... What those machines do is get you to sound generic. Like everyone else.

If you are a tuning klutz? Then use them. I have heard some pretty badly tuned snares. But when I heard a beautifully tuned snare they were not using these devices, Its all about intuitive feel and your ears...... and, finding a good room to tune in. If the room has lots of echo it will mask what you are doing while tuning....

Millennials can't tune? :dontknow:
 

Elvis

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I use an iphone app along with ear. The tune-bot style tuners report a single frequency, but that's selected from typically a wide spectrum of frequencies which may change over time. Some apps have a graphic display which is useful when having trouble or when ear doesn't agree with the readings. Often times when having trouble there are 2 peak frequencies but the bot style app will just pick one to report.
I wonder how they know which frequency to pick?
The one that comes across the strongest, I guess?
I say this, because way back when, I worked at a music store and we used to sell Korg chromatic tuners.
I took one and set it next to a 14" floor tom that was tuned to a nice sound, just to see what note it was actually playing with.
The drum was tuned competently and sounded good, but when I put the tuner next to and turned it on, it must've registered every note it was capable of registering...twice!.
I even pulled the heads and tried to find out what note the shell itself rang at (ala DW's claim about tuning heads to the note value of the shell). Not as wild a fluctuation, but not much better, either.
To this day, I'm still not sure what note the drum was tuned to or what note the shell sang at.
The readings really were ALL over the place.
After that experiment, I lost interest in tuning to a note and went back to getting a good sound and feel out of the drum and left it at that.

Elvis
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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Of which I am one.
I use a Drum Dial, Iphone Pro Tuner, and my pitch perfect ears;)
I have been experimenting on my 196X supraphonic.

I know how to seat a head and tune a drum.
I am trying to understand why when I use the DD and tap two lugs (one reads 85 and the one next to it 89). The Iphone Tuner reads G# on both (around 197 hz).
My ears read the same. My question is how can the DD read different numbers when the pitch was the same. I hit the drum about the lug about one inch the edge with the same pressure.
How? It ain’t as accurate as you think. And one looks for a note. One looks for a tension reading. Tune for Jazz with 1- response 2- tone. 3- buzzing elimination. Tune for any other music- no buzzing, sound.
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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Measuring physical deflection (Drum Dial) is a secondary effect that doesn't guarantee pitch accuracy due to heads and bearing edges mostly. Tunebot measures pitch directly,and is actually helpful in training your ears IMO. All the curmudgeons yelling USE YOUR EARS IDIOTS! Likely had benefit of an experienced ear teaching them when they learned. Most people when they start have trouble hearing the complex overtones in the drum which is enharmonic. It's easy to spend a lot of time chasing what you think you hear only to have it be the opposite lug, or opposite head. Hearing one partial and missing the weaker one below, etc... The old timers didn't learn without benefit of a reference, and you probably won't either. I just find the tunebot a handy reference that is extremely helpful, and the more I used it, the better my ear got.
Hmm. Any drummer that cannot hear a good note vs bad note is at a disadvantage. I can tell if the instruments are in tune, played sharp or flat, sound bad. Couldn’t care less what that NOTE it is. For 60 years I tune for a tone that starts high and goes lower on the toms. Response on the snare. But I started on snare.
 

GeneZ

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Those tuners are good for replacing a head on a gig where you can not hear how you are tuning. If I were to use one, I would tune my drums by ear in a room where I can judge how I am tuning. Then, with one of those devices, make a record of how I have each head tuned. That way, if need be, I can replace a head quickly and get it where I want my drums to be. The reason I say that is because I discovered that in certain rooms you really can not hear your drums. But, to those out front and away they may sound excellent to someone listening at a distance.
 

RIDDIM

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Of which I am one.
I use a Drum Dial, Iphone Pro Tuner, and my pitch perfect ears;)
I have been experimenting on my 196X supraphonic.

I know how to seat a head and tune a drum.
I am trying to unde
Just because the tensions are different, doesnt mean the pitch or note is different. The DD measures tension, the tuner gives you the note that particular lug is producing at that tension.
- and what we're after in tuning is a drum that sounds great, no?
 


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