Friday Five Fer: Genesis - Their Most Prog-Rocking B-Sides

DrummerJustLikeDad

That's Me, The Silent Son
Joined
Mar 16, 2018
Messages
1,064
Reaction score
1,424
Location
Drumline in the Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging
Ah, Genesis. Pop darlings of 80s radio, am I right?

The fact is, Genesis kept right on recording fantastic prog-rock tracks, even during their top 40 years. The material was always there; you just had to know where to look for it. More often than not, it was lying buried on the flipside of their latest Single.

I've often said that, had Genesis simply switched the B-sides of their 45 RPMs for their A-sides, then re-populated their album tracklists accordingly, they would have remained known as a formidable prog-rock band for the duration of their career (who just happened to release funny, obscure little pop-dance tunes on the flipsides of their 45s).

Same EXACT material, but different presentation = different reputation and career.

Twilight Alehouse, 1972, recorded during the Foxtrot sessions. Belgian TV appearance.

This song had actually begun life during the band's earliest period, as the organ riff shows up as a link between two cuts on their very first album. It had developed into a strong stage favorite by 1970 and presents some of Peter Gabriel's best, most extended flute work. The siren effect at the end is achieved by Tony Banks powering his organ on and off while holding the keys. Finally recorded in 1972, it showed up as the B-side to "I Know What I Like" from the following album's sessions in 1973.


Inside and Out, 1976, recorded during the Wind & Wuthering sessions. Released on Spot the Pigeon EP, 1977. Live concert in Zurich.

Steve Hackett had argued strongly for this song's inclusion on W&W. Despite being rejected for that album, it became yet another rarity that found great success as a rousing stage piece. Finally released a year later as part of a three-song EP, this song became the very final recording of Genesis to feature Steve Hackett on guitar during their classic period.


The Day the Light Went Out, 1978, recorded during the ...And Then There Were Three... sessions.

Released as the flipside to Many Too Many (which itself happens to be Banks's last recorded use of a melotron with the band), this first album as a three-piece introduced the discipline of writing shorter songs. The band had always been known for softer, more pastoral pieces; but as those were beginning to shape into the radio-friendly ballads the world is familiar with, this track was a strong reminder that Genesis still knew how to write inventive, energized prog with darker themes.


Naminanu, 1981, recorded during the Abacab sessions.

The Abacab sessions were extremely prolific, since they marked the first time Genesis were able to lay down tracks in their very own studio, The Farm. This (essentially) instrumental track is part of a legendary suite of songs that was never to be, though its individual parts have survived. In thinning out songs for inclusion on the album, the decision was made to avoid repeating the habit of presenting full album-side suites with different sections strung together, a la Supper's Ready and Duke. There's great drumming from Phil Collins here, along with huge energy from all, from the flipside to Keep It Dark.


Feeding the Fire, 1986, recorded during the Invisible Touch sessions.

This song is especially frustrating to find merely on a single's flipside, as I think it could have proved quite viable on any drivetime radio slot. It's a strong, rocking number, which can make it difficult to believe it shares its time and place with its more well-known siblings. It eventually found its way onto the B-side of Land of Confusion.

 

Mcjnic

DFO Master
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2010
Messages
3,301
Reaction score
2,019
Nicely done.
These are excellent picks.
Some deeeeeeep cuts here. I’ve not heard a few of these.
Many thanks.
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

That's Me, The Silent Son
Joined
Mar 16, 2018
Messages
1,064
Reaction score
1,424
Location
Drumline in the Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging
I like to think that the timpani-style roll in the fade out of Dodo/Lurker is the same timpani roll that fades up in the intro of Submarine.

There are a fan theories about which order those songs belong to each other, and I think that’s a good indicator of how the puzzle pieces fit.

Moving piece, I deeply enjoy this one. It felt like Tony Banks was almost channeling a bit of Rick Wright here.
 
Last edited:

Deafmoon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
391
Reaction score
292
Great stuff and even more proof that Calling All Stations should never have been released.
 

musiqman

Very well Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2016
Messages
1,276
Reaction score
688
Location
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Ah, Genesis. Pop darlings of 80s radio, am I right?

The fact is, Genesis kept right on recording fantastic prog-rock tracks, even during their top 40 years. The material was always there; you just had to know where to look for it. More often than not, it was lying buried on the flipside of their latest Single.

I've often said that, had Genesis simply switched the B-sides of their 45 RPMs for their A-sides, then re-populated their album tracklists accordingly, they would have remained known as a formidable prog-rock band for the duration of their career (who just happened to release funny, obscure little pop-dance tunes on the flipsides of their 45s).

Same EXACT material, but different presentation = different reputation and career.

Twilight Alehouse, 1972, recorded during the Foxtrot sessions. Belgian TV appearance.

This song had actually begun life during the band's earliest period, as the organ riff shows up as a link between two cuts on their very first album. It had developed into a strong stage favorite by 1970 and presents some of Peter Gabriel's best, most extended flute work. The siren effect at the end is achieved by Tony Banks powering his organ on and off while holding the keys. Finally recorded in 1972, it showed up as the B-side to "I Know What I Like" from the following album's sessions in 1973.


Inside and Out, 1976, recorded during the Wind & Wuthering sessions. Released on Spot the Pigeon EP, 1977. Live concert in Zurich.

Steve Hackett had argued strongly for this song's inclusion on W&W. Despite being rejected for that album, it became yet another rarity that found great success as a rousing stage piece. Finally released a year later as part of a three-song EP, this song became the very final recording of Genesis to feature Steve Hackett on guitar during their classic period.


The Day the Light Went Out, 1978, recorded during the ...And Then There Were Three... sessions.

Released as the flipside to Many Too Many (which itself happens to be Banks's last recorded use of a melotron with the band), this first album as a three-piece introduced the discipline of writing shorter songs. The band had always been known for softer, more pastoral pieces; but as those were beginning to shape into the radio-friendly ballads the world is familiar with, this track was a strong reminder that Genesis still knew how to write inventive, energized prog with darker themes.


Naminanu, 1981, recorded during the Abacab sessions.

The Abacab sessions were extremely prolific, since they marked the first time Genesis were able to lay down tracks in their very own studio, The Farm. This (essentially) instrumental track is part of a legendary suite of songs that was never to be, though its individual parts have survived. In thinning out songs for inclusion on the album, the decision was made to avoid repeating the habit of presenting full album-side suites with different sections strung together, a la Supper's Ready and Duke. There's great drumming from Phil Collins here, along with huge energy from all, from the flipside to Keep It Dark.


Feeding the Fire, 1986, recorded during the Invisible Touch sessions.

This song is especially frustrating to find merely on a single's flipside, as I think it could have proved quite viable on any drivetime radio slot. It's a strong, rocking number, which can make it difficult to believe it shares its time and place with its more well-known siblings. It eventually found its way onto the B-side of Land of Confusion.

Love this what if concept.

“Feeding” could be a “But Seriously” Phill song too.

Especially, live, whith the band he used for that tour.

 

thejohnlec

Very well Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
629
Reaction score
481
Location
Ohio Valley
There's also the 3x3 EP

Paperlate (great single)
You Might Recall (better than most on Abacab)
Me and Virgil (where they were going for "The Band" vibe")


Cheers
Mick
I’ve always loved these three songs. Phil is quoted as saying that Me & Virgil is one of their worst songs. I think the lyrics tell a cool story.
 

thejohnlec

Very well Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
629
Reaction score
481
Location
Ohio Valley
The medley on Three Sides Live holds a special place for me. Always thrilling to listen to it even now.
 


Top