Gene Krupa @ Metropole NYC Sep 1966

Capt Wierd

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Oh and by the way Moomdog was a drummer, google him

I remember Moondog because on my way to the CBS BUILDING I'd pass him and say hello, I don't remember ever getting a civil response
 

zutty

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Zutty - '[font="tahoma][size="2"]Hey does Papaya King still have the $2 2 dog and a bev. special? grin.. '[/size][/font]
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[font="tahoma][size="3"]It must be a $5.00 'special' by now! lol[/size][/font]
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[font="tahoma][size="3"]Reso - '[/size][/font][font="tahoma][size="2"]and Bleeker, Dino Danelli lives here![/size][/font][font="tahoma][size="2"]'[/size][/font]
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[color="#474747"][font="tahoma][size="2"]Got a quick New York story for you:[/size][/font]

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[color="#474747"][font="tahoma][size="2"]In the spring of 1967 my band was playing at a dive on 11th Street and Avenue A over on the lower east-side. An A&R man for Elan Associates (producers/mgmt for Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna and a ton of other 60's greats) was sitting in the audience. After our last set this suit walks over to me and the lead guitar player (the guy was accompanied by two gorgeous women, he had one hanging on each arm,) gives us each a business card and asks if we'd come to his office on Monday morning. Me and the guitar player looked at each other thinking that the guy was full of s**t and he was just trying to impress the ladies. Monday morning myself and the guitar player are at the Brill Building on 57th Street and we can't believe we're there. When we arrive at the offices we get treated like royalty and shown into the producers office. This little Jewish guy rolls in already talking sporting a white-boy afro, wearing tiny, round, hippie glasses with purple lenses and what looked like a Mambo shirt, you know, the ones with the big, puffy sleeves. As he's walking into the office babbling away, me and my buddy suddenly realized he was talking to us the whole time! He throws down two contracts in front of us explaining that we were being hired as session players for a new studio that they had built and to be part of a 'studio house band' that they wanted to put behind a singer they had signed. 1967, I'm 17 years old and I'm being contracted to play drums and get paid a whopping $400. a week pay plus more $ when we played gigs that -they- booked for us. That was four times more than my father was earning at that time. [/size][/font]

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[color="#474747"][font="tahoma][size="2"]The studio was Ben-Gor Studios on Bleeker Street, near Bowery Ave. I worked there as a session drummer and with that in-house band for a year and a half. I blew it because of drugs. Heroin to be specific. Set me on a ride through Hell that lasted three years. I ended up in Phoenix House in 1969 as one of the founding core-group members. I've been happy and heroin-free since then. But man, the career in music I could have had! I was in the right place at the right time and in with the right people. I was subbing with groups like the Lovin' Spoonful and the Blues Magoos, groups that all went on to make records and tour. I wonder how many other similar stories there are. Guys that came real close to a career in music back in the 60's/70's that blew it because of drugs.[/size][/font]

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[color="#474747"][font="tahoma][size="2"]New York story...[/size][/font]

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[color="#474747"][font="tahoma][size="2"]John[/size][/font]

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Damn John...That's a really rough story. I'm glad that you straightened out, even if it was at the expense of losing that opportunity. With me it wasn't drugs that was my downfall, but a broad. I was doin ok. Subbing for some real heavies, McCoy, LL Smith, and also doing blues tours..was with Pinetop for many moons.teaching...recording...etc...then I met my old high school sweetheart and bam...I screwed it all and left for freakin Maine! Well...after a disasterous few years...this broad turned out to be a total looney tune...with a crackhead son who robbed me blind..I just came home with my tail between my legs, almost destitute...The capper? I was just diagnosed with leukemia..I'll be lucky to last a couple years...no healthcare...no nothin....We all have our stories and drama in this life I guess...
And btw....at $5 those 2 dogs and a beverage are still the best bargain in town...best dogs in town at 72nd and bway.
 

marko52

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I grew up north of the city (westchester), & would take the commuter train in, to go to Manny's. That place was totally intimidating to me--don't think I ever bought anything, or even spoke to anyone while I was in there. I remember Moondog--don't think they'd let anyone stand around with a 7-foot spear, these days. Hell---I saw people in NYC that made Moondog look like a Republican!.......marko
 

Resohead

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John, THAT'S some story! I look at it this way however. You managed to get your life back on the rails. If it cost an opportunity like that, well, I think you made out on the deal. After all you are still here with us. That can't be said for so many others. Don't lose sight of what the really big gig is.

Zutty, hang in there man.

I feel I may have missed out on a NYC experience. I worked for a few years on W72nd, a half block down from Papaya King. Never stopped in for a dog, even though I walked past the place at least twice a day to get to the 72nd street subway station. DOH!
 

Purdie Shuffle

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It is what it is, I have no regrets about anything. The reason I didn't jump right back into music after rehab is because I spent the next twelve years working as a counselor at first, and later as the director of a residential treatment facility for Phoenix House. I also married young and as a result I have a 38 year-old daughter who has given me three wonderful grandchildren and my 35 year-old son (N.Y.C. Firefighter) who has given me one grandchild - four altogether. I've had a rich, full and fulfilling life. I have no complaints at all. Drums, bands and music have been a part of my life, all of my life. It's an integral part of who I am. It would have been great if I'd experienced a successful career in music, but realistically speaking, how many of those are there? No, I'm ok with how things unfolded for me. In fact, I may be better off than if I'd gone pro at some point. Music isn't 'work' for me, It is and always has been, a source of deep joy and personal gratification for me.

I learned a long time ago to -get out of my own way- and simply follow my bliss where it leads me...

"[font="tahoma][size="2"]I feel I may have missed out on a NYC experience. I worked for a few years on W72nd, a half block down from Papaya King. Never stopped in for a dog, even though I walked past the place at least twice a day to get to the 72nd street subway station. DOH! [/size][/font]"


Even if you are a die-hard vegetarian, you would have loved Papaya King hot-dogs. Mind you, I'm really not a good person to ask because, every time I went to Papaya King, it was to feed a ferocious THC induced munchie attack. Even White Castle belly-bombs smell great under those conditions and we all know belly-bombs smell the same way going in as they do coming out... so don't go by me! lol

John
 

Resohead

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Aha! I finally realized why Papaya King didn't really sound right to me. I was thinking of Gray's Papaya on 72nd steet. Apparently, Papaya King is up on 86th.

When it came to White Castle "Belly Bombs" however, there I have great experience! Back when we were kids it was customary after a gig to stop and down a dozen or so. We called them "Rectal Rockets".

I still now and then stop at WC and pick up a sack. I'm only good for somewhere between 5-7 of them now (must be outta shape). But I don't detect any change in them over all this time. And, your observance of the distinct aroma is spot on, and still true.
 

Purdie Shuffle

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This ought to jog a few memories... remember the continuous musical jam sessions going on around the fountain?

Enjoy the trip in the way-back machine:


John
 
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Resohead

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Nice to watch! But by '68 I had signed on for a 4 year hitch that had me riding US government provided big grey yachts in the Pacific. Spending the last 2 years in a certain Southeast Asian nation. So I didn't get to see much of the goings-on here.
But we DID have our own frequent jam sessions however.



 

Purdie Shuffle

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Hey, were those Slingy BDP's the Navy's or yours? Great photos.

The Nam... never went, lost a few close friends there. One of them to drug addiction after he got back. Glad you made it through ok. That war produced a lot of ghosts, damaged bodies, and wounded minds and souls.

John
 

Capt Wierd

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Hey that video, I couldn't play it, not a real good connection out here in Rehobeth Beach Delaware, is that Banana Dave.?? I played bongos with him and a another conga player, Morris Aikins aka Jamaica back in the late 60s at the fountain in Washington Square Park. What the hell was Dave's last name........ oh Rossario or something, there was a guy named Harold too, gawd that's too long ago, if that is Banana Dave
 

Resohead

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Hehe, The drums actually belonged to one of the guitar players (sitting on the amp in the first photo). He lived in the LA area, close to where we were homeported, so we felt it easier to bring those aboard rather than to bring my WFL's from NYC. Not Slingy's though. They were MIJ, badge said "Coronet". They really sounded pretty good! His cymbals were pretty crappy though, so on one of my leaves I brought my Zildjians and Luddy floor tom on board. (it was BDP also, so it matched the set nicely...LOL) Believe it or not, American Airlines let me take that 16x16 on board and strapped it into the seat next to me! Still have it, still use it. That's it in the first FT postion. I always loved playing 1 up 2 down.
We played every chance we got, we really enjoyed it, and the rest of the crew seemed to as well.

As for the combat part, well, I consider myself lucky. All my combat was long range. I operated the computer and radar system used to aim and fire the ship's guns, I get to pull the trigger. We had three 5"54 caliber gun mounts (roughly equivalent to a 125mm), they fired a 70 pound projectile to a range of 13 miles. Each gun mount had a fire rate of 40 rounds per minute, so we could deliver a tremendous amount of fire support to the guys on the ground out there. We did it ....alot.
Sure, they would shoot at us now and then, only hit us once causing mostly superficial damage. I really felt for the guys walking through the jungles and rice paddies though. THAT was tough.
 

Purdie Shuffle

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"We had three 5"54 caliber gun mounts (roughly equivalent to a 125mm), they fired a 70 pound projectile to a range of 13 miles. Each gun mount had a fire rate of 40 rounds per minute, so we could deliver a tremendous amount of fire support to the guys on the ground out there. We did it ....alot."

The sound of those guns must have made anyone within earshot think the world was ending! The powerful thunder of all those guns going must have really been something to behold.
Again, glad you're home safe and sound, brother.


John
 

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