George Fludas is Bonham 2.0 on drums

Tarkus

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Hi Markus,

Thanks so much! I think I read about a Hayman kit, maybe in Thunder Of Drums, but I have never seen any evidence of it. The only pre Zeppelin photo I've seen of John playing is on what looks like a Trixon kit, but maybe it's a Hayman?? This photo is from around 1965 so that's a bit early considering that source you noted says the Hayman kit was acquired in 1968. This photo looks like a Trixon kit. I wonder if he used the Hayman kit to record LZ 1?? I wish Mick Hinton was still around to ask.

View attachment 493173
Thank you for your respond.

I guess the kit in the photo is the red Trixon he played with Terry Webb and the Spiders. The tom mount couldn't be Hayman, and the date doesn't fit either. Hayman drums were not produced before 1968.

The idea that he could have used Hayman on Led Zeppelin's first album was new to me. Just listened to it, with this in mind, and I can't rule it out completely. Some songs have the typical Ludwig sound, especially the big bass drum (most likely 26x14) in 'Dazed and confused'. As far as I know, the voluminous Hayman bass drums (24 or 26 inch), you might need for such sounds, appeared a bit later ('69 or '70) and are very rare.
But, some other songs (You shook me, Your time is gonna come) could well have been played on a Hayman, theoretically. I mean, it's his typical 'Bonham sound', he might have created with drums other than Ludwig as well. But, considering Led Zeppelins short time budget for recording, I can't imagine that they experimented much with different drum kits, rather than with different tuning/miking/mixing of the same kit to get the different sounds. There must be enough people still around who remember that exactly. Or maybe there are 'isolated drum tracks' around, which make hearing easier, but I have not seen any from their first album.

Anyway, regarding his personal Hayman, I guess, his children might know something about what happened to his old kit. Just have no clue how to ask them. And of course, Mike Hinton might have known about.
 
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Carlos McSnurf

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The idea that he could have used Hayman on Led Zeppelin's first album was new to me. Just listened to it, with this in mind, and I can't rule it out completely. Some songs have the typical Ludwig sound, especially the big bass drum (most likely 26x14) in 'Dazed and confused'. As far as I know, the voluminous Hayman bass drums (24 or 26 inch), you might need for such sounds, appeared a bit later ('69 or '70) and are very rare.
But, some other songs (You shook me, Your time is gonna come) could well have been played on a Hayman, theoretically. I mean, it's his typical 'Bonham sound', he might have created with drums other than Ludwig as well. But, considering Led Zeppelins short time budget for recording, I can't imagine that they experimented much with different drum kits, rather than with different tuning/miking/mixing of the same kit to get the different sounds. There must be enough people still around who remember that exactly. Or maybe there are 'isolated drum tracks' around, which make hearing easier, but I have not seen any from their first album.
I wish it could be possible. Regarding the “1st album kit”, it is widely considered that slingerland 22/13/16 (taken from yardbirds) with 5” ludwig supra was used by John. Regardless the brands (which is very interesting - why not? Maybe he played Premier drums instead, like Mitch Mitchell on first Experience album) most significant difference is tuning. Drums on first album (if we not focus on Bonham touch) are tuned in classic 60’s style: top tight/bottom low. This applies also for the bass. Ringo bass sounds similar (listen to isolated drum track of Ticket to Ride for example: it’s 22, but has big ooomph, buried in the mix). LZ II has noticeably different tuning. I wonder where John and engineers figured it out. Probably by accident...
 

tbird8450

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LZ II seems to use different tuning even within the album. For example, listen to the snare on Whole Lotta Love versus Moby Dick. The snare tuning on MD appears to be a good deal lower. I'm not sure how much (if any) of this has to due with differences in recording / EQ'ing / etc versus differences in the tuning of the actual snare itself, but if I'm following along and trying to match the snare sound, it's impossible to do so on those two tracks without adjusting the snare (batter) head differently for each.
 
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wflkurt

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LZ II seems to use different tuning even within the album. For example, listen to the snare on Whole Lotta Love versus Moby Dick. The snare tuning on MD appears to be a good deal lower. I'm not sure how much (if any) of this has to due with differences in recording / EQ'ing / etc versus differences in the tuning of the actual snare itself, but if I'm following along and trying to match the snare sound, it's impossible to do so on those two tracks without adjusting the snare (batter) head differently for each.

I know that LZ II was recorded at various studious while LZ was on tour in 1969. I'm not sure how often John changed heads, or re-tuned the set. I also don't know what any of the studios they recorded in were like. It certainly explains the difference in sounds from song to song.

I could be wrong but LZ I sounds like a Slingerland set to me. I have played a few over the years and that's just what I am feeling.
 


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