Get Back

Houndog

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Like I said, I liked many of their popular hits, but not enough to listen to on the daily.
Yeah , that sounds like me .
The last show in this series actually got on my nerves ……Until they finally started playing on the roof . I found that very enjoyable.
 

aratts

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after watching all 3 segments, the moments that come back to me—

1. When asked whether he liked the Hare Krishnas, Ringo practically sneered “no”.
2. George asking the others whether they regretted going to India— Paul quickly said no, although he had just said “that was not us”. John clearly had nothing but contempt for the whole experience. I could see the disappointment in george’s face— that had been the one time when he had lead the others.
3. Paul strumming his bass and coming up with Get Back with George
4. George helping Ringo with Octopus‘s Garden
5. John clearly having a great time playing live on the roof

that said, I felt for George Harrison— his offered contributions were certainly as good as John’s at that point, and Paul did nothing but patronizing dismiss them, often with silence, and John who was a strung out, spent creative force, would make fun of them. No wonder George said forget this— if Bob Dylan thought he was good enough to collaborate with, why would you stick around with such treatment.
 

blueshadow

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For those who got bored with part one give part two a shot. More studio recording less dead time. Though still a lot of smoke tea and yoko. I could do without the last for sure! I find it interesting that nothing is said to John by the other members Either that bridge was already burned or they chose to put up with it. At least she sits quietly for the most part.
 

hsosdrum

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For those who got bored with part one give part two a shot. More studio recording less dead time. Though still a lot of smoke tea and yoko. I could do without the last for sure! I find it interesting that nothing is said to John by the other members Either that bridge was already burned or they chose to put up with it. At least she sits quietly for the most part.
The other 3 put up with it because John made it known that if they went against Yoko he would side with her and quit the band.
 

K.O.

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One minor quibble on the Beatles history introduction to episode one. It states that top Liverpool drummer Ringo Starr is asked to join the band and then says that Brian Epstein starts to manage the group. Of course Brian came along quite a bit before Ringo signed on. Brian getting stuck with the task of firing Pete Best to facilitate that change in the lineup. Kind of a glaring chronological error when the actual facts are pretty well known.

I'm a pretty big Beatle fan but it took me two sittings to get through each episode. Not because I didn't enjoy it all but because at my age I find it hard to sit through anything for much more than 90 minutes at a time. I did get each episode watched on the day it came out though.

Everything is cast in a much different light than the moody darkness that the Let It Be doc seemed to show. Perhaps that was Lindsay-Hogg's revenge for them not giving him the big epic ending he really wanted and that he kept trying to talk them into.

I liked that they had a roadie named Kevin. I have to go back sometime and get an audio clip of Lennon barking his name...might make a nice ringtone for me.

And, if and when that 16 hour director's cut comes out I'm sure I'll be in line to get it. I already have the book and the 5 CD box set of the music so what's another 100 bucks or so to be a completest.
 

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Don’t have Disney plus so I’ll need to wait for now but I have been excited for this watching the trailers and little pieces here and there.
 

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It’s amazing so many Forumites are reacting to this doc with uncritical reverence, right?

The fact there are some odd or annoying characters in the film does not make it a bad film, or not very interesting to watch. It's not like you are posting insightful commentary which includes criticism of a person included, all you are doing is posting snark. Nothing of worth.
 

Whitten

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It’s amazing so many Forumites are reacting to this doc with uncritical reverence, right?

Like it or not (I get it, some people don't) you are witnessing the creation of hugely popular songs that have already lived for 50 years and are likely to be important songs even 100 years from now. If you are interested in music you SHOULD be interested in that process.
I constantly get tired of reading posts on forums about 'the chicks, the parties, the private jets' in professional music, but the realty is very different.
It is actually pretty boring sitting in a studio for days on end trying to make your album.
Maybe it's self indulgent, but these films are hours of documentation of the many MORE hours it took to make the records.
 

Vistalite Black

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The fact there are some odd or annoying characters in the film does not make it a bad film, or not very interesting to watch. It's not like you are posting insightful commentary which includes criticism of a person included, all you are doing is posting snark. Nothing of worth.
Actually, it seems more like I struck a nerve with my reference to Yoko reacting to Harrison quitting the band with extended caterwauling. She’s not a fringe character … She’s literally sitting in a circle with the other four — meaning the filmmaker can’t remove her, even though it’s clear he wanted to.
Doesn’t make it less amazing to see McCartney come up with the core of a timeless song in seconds (as Yoko read a newspaper), but it does make one question whether the “Hobbit”’director was a tad over-committed to his shiny, happy vision of The Beatles.
 
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Whitten

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Actually, it seems more like I struck a nerve with my reference to Yoko reacting to Harrison quitting the band with extended caterwauling. She’s not a fringe character … She’s literally sitting in a circle with the other four —

I didn't say she was a 'fringe' character, I said there were going to be 'annoying characters' but that should not take away from the body of the film. You are only posting cynical, negativity. That's my only beef. Of course there is negativity to be pointed out, but not to the exclusion of everything else.
You say the director was 'over committed to his shiny, happy vision of The Beatles', but you haven't sifted through the 60 hours of footage that he has, and you weren't in the studio when they shot the film (made the record). How you would therefore know it's a one sided vision I have no idea.
 

Vistalite Black

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I didn't say she was a 'fringe' character, I said there were going to be 'annoying characters' but that should not take away from the body of the film. You are only posting cynical, negativity. That's my only beef. Of course there is negativity to be pointed out, but not to the exclusion of everything else.
You say the director was 'over committed to his shiny, happy vision of The Beatles', but you haven't sifted through the 60 hours of footage that he has, and you weren't in the studio when they shot the film (made the record). How you would therefore know it's a one sided vision I have no idea.

I saw "Let It Be." I read books quoting the Beatles themselves. I have seen quite a few Disney Corporation productions in my life. I saw this in the LA Times:

"That disconnect between the perception and the reality of the “Get Back” sessions of early 1969 and its role in the band’s demise has lingered for half a century in the minds of fans — and the Beatles themselves. Lennon later called it “the most miserable session on Earth,” and McCartney said the film “showed how the breakup of a group works.”

Now Peter Jackson’s seven-hour-plus docuseries “Get Back,” premiering Thursday on Disney+, aims to redirect the spotlight to the Beatles’ creative camaraderie and affectionate goofing that were the actual heart of those sessions."

 

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I took the opportunity to watch the entire series over the weekend. It reminded me a little of a statement about the reality of war from the perspective of the average soldier: "Long periods of boredom punctuated by short bursts of intense violence" (or something along these lines).

The Get Back film makes a similar statement about the reality of creating music and the indeterminacy of projects. As such, even in its highly edited state, I think the duration helps to give a sense of this reality as opposed to the experience of the final product of a recording session (such as a polished album). It is a fascinating study of group dynamics, of the struggles and breakthroughs of the creative process (which is often more on the spur than what people tend to think for even the most "visionary" of groups), character studies (and what characters!), and the ability to be one in the room, as it were, during the creation of some music that many of us know so well. It's the next best thing to being able to visit Apple Studios for a day and hang out with the band while they are working. As such, it is fascinating to witness, and to feel that intimacy, while still acknowledging that they knew the cameras were rolling, and that (as George says at one point) if they had discovered who they really were when they went to India, none of them would be there in the studio acting their part at that moment (suggesting that they are still not being their authentic selves).

It's probably not for everyone (it's not the best entry point into the Beatles, for sure). A shorter, tighter version could be culled for a more general audience, but then the feeling of the long endurance and existential angst would be diminished in a more truncated form. It would be like cutting the spanning desert scenes from Lawrence of Arabia to make it move along more quickly, when that desert expanse is key to entering into Lawrence's world.

Ringo throughout was quiet, relaxed, resigned - however you want to read his pound dog eyes. He often looked like he was tired (and seemed to have some late nights out). His drumming seemed to be taken for granted; he was a solid presence, never questioned, always playing the right thing at the right time. His drums sounded great. Aside from a few light-hearted moments from him, the most forceful and meaningful thing he said came near the end when there was still discussion if the rooftop concert was going to happen. George said he didn't want to be on the rooftop, and before Paul or John could waffle around some more, Ringo interjected, "I want to be on the rooftop." After keeping silent during so many of the other back-and-forth conversations among the others, Ringo (just like his drumming style), punctuated the conversation with a strong fill at just the right time. It was brilliant.
 
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Rich K.

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Did anyone notice Ringo playing "open handed" in episode 2 on "Don't Let Me Down"?

I think Yoko was less intrusive than I had imagined. She's pretting much just sitting there (other than the "freak out").
I also think she's more attractive in the film than she looked on the album cover.
 

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Did anyone notice Ringo playing "open handed" in episode 2 on "Don't Let Me Down"?
You mean the left hand on the bell of the left side cymbal ? I noticed that in one of the clips (haven't seen the full thing yet). Pretty cool. I think his drumming on the whole Let it Be album is great. As already mentioned, one of the other clips shows McCartney coming up with the Get Back riff from nothing - do we also get to see Ringo come up with his drum part ?
 

K.O.

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It seems that at some point afterwards the Beatles realized this might be their last album and decided that they didn't want that to be their final work (although due to the release order it ultimately was their last new album to come out). They rang up George Martin and asked to do another album like they used to, with the result being the slickly produced Abbey Road. Many of the songs from which were being worked on during these sessions. I wish there had been the same sort of in depth filming during those sessions. By then the writing was pretty well on the wall as far as an inevitable break up so maybe those sessions were less cheerful but I guess we'll never really know. They did manage to knock one more out of the park though.

I've always wondered, if Lennon hadn't been assasinated, if they might have regrouped at some point. I know they had reservations that they could never live up to what people might expect but at some point the potential earnings would have been overpowering. Not to mention seeing other band's like the Stones and the Who continue to roll on to huge success and knowing that they could likely top them if they simply wanted to. Maybe it's for the best that they never had the chance. Like Marilyn Monroe or James Dean they left while on top, leaving us wanting more.
 


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