Gig kit recommendations

DanRH

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Whenever I read the replies-the ones recommending playing out on your "best" gear...whether at the Hilton or literally "in the gutter"...

I am always curious what your annual income is? Net or gross... Doesn't need to be down to the penny, within a couple grand would work.

Not trying to be nosy, just genuinely curious.
I’ve always been resourceful when it comes to buying gear. If I didn’t have the funds, I’d save up and make it happen. It had no bearing on if I was making 25k in the 80’s or what I earned last year.
 

shuffle

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Listen to me -- Buy USED a Pacific CX or LX model drumset. The best ones are those whose manufacturing date is closest to the year 2000 manufacturing start date. The first year (2000) production have Hard Rock American Maple shells whose wood was chosen from stocks of maple already waiting to be manufactured into DW drums. This wood taken from the DW stocks was then trucked down to the new DW/Pacific plant in Encenada, Mexico and turned into some of the finest drums that DW ever built. Do not doubt me on this.

I cannot imagine a more road-worthy drum set than these. They are build like tanks, and have great tom holders, and all other metal fixtures. And even though prices for these has been going up steadily (The word finally gets around), but you can still buy or assemble a six-piece set for well under $600, and sometimes the seller includes the hardware.

How do they sound? Exactly like DW's standard maple shell drums. Don't believe me? Listen to this: (this is exactly what I hear when I sit down behind my CX kit:


GeeDeeEmm
GDE,I agree,actually thought of just collecting them in diff wraps because tbey ate so cheap but like you said,very available and cheap.
In fact,the last CX I bought was 200$, one panel on 14 faded just a little,thats it!
 

blueshadow

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Whenever I read the replies-the ones recommending playing out on your "best" gear...whether at the Hilton or literally "in the gutter"...

I am always curious what your annual income is? Net or gross... Doesn't need to be down to the penny, within a couple grand would work.

Not trying to be nosy, just genuinely curious.
No problem being curious.... when I bought my drums 25 years ago I was in college still. Borrowed out of my college savings to buy them and basically paid it back by gigging on the weekends. There was no "good kit" "practice kit" "beater kit" was just 1 set of drums. I invested the money up front in good cases from Protector (Now Gator) and tossed them in the back of the truck and off to the gig. The cases are almost bullet proof, they've been rained on dropped etc and minimal damage in those 25 years. Of course I've always loaded my own stuff and never been full on out on tour either though. I guess for me gigging is what I buy drums for and whether it's a dump or fancy hall something could happen at either, but I still am taking them

edit: I do however have a beater bass drum and a couple of toms that weren't part of my original kit. These are used if/when I need to leave my drums in a van overnight on a gig...in case of theft
 
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Mongrel

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Appreciate the guys who answered regarding income and gigging kits...wasn't trying to be a d*ck-mainly wanted to see if income had anything to do with your choices. The assumption being those with more disposable income are taking less of a financial risk because a replacement kit is only a credit card or cash transaction away.
When I had one kit, my first Rogers, it was played out everywhere-even where it probably shouldn't have been considering I had no bags, let alone cases. In '99 I got a great deal on a Tama Starclassic Performer and the became my gigging kit and the Rogers stayed (and were\are enjoyed) in house. Today I will take out any of the gear I have but I am selective about it.

I look at it the same way a guy with a classic car would look at it. Both his '69 Chevelle and his '63 Vette are meant to be driven-correct? I mean they are cars after all...four wheels, engines...beautiful paint. I mean they should be driven...right? We can all agree on that I hope...

But there are those days...pouring rain....snow...slush...ice... And there are those places...back country dirt roads, the court house in Camden NJ, certain areas of Philly ...on street parking...you know those kind of things...

Where it would be just plain stupid to drive a classic car...

And for those times we have 2005 Ford F150s and Stage Customs. LOL

But hey, I'm not judging anybody.
 
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AaronLatos

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Another vote for cases. Beato Pro1 are a best of both worlds option: easy to put drums into like hard cases, pack well into small cars like traditional soft cases, fire and water resistant, and are, imho, better protection than either in anything but a brute "crush" scenario (in which case you're probably screwed unless they're in "trunk" cases anyways).

I say take your best drums for anything except for playing outdoors in actual sleeting below zero weather in which you KNOW any wood drums will suffer from the elements... and then have a synthetic kit for that. ;)

I tour 40s Radio Kings and 20s snares on up to modern gear. Did so when I was fresh out of college with an annual income of essentially nothing, still do it today now that's thankfully not the case. :)
 

paul

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I vote for cases, too. The closest thing I have to a beater kit is a six piece Catalina Maple, and they stay here at home. My best drums go to gigs. Always. For me it's a question of respecting the music and the audience, and of the pleasure I derive from playing great drums for audiences. The picture below was taken about a month ago. The drums have been gigged regularly since I got them in 2001. Good cases work.

Great instruments are meant to be played.
 

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dogmanaut

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JazzDrumGuy mentioned his APKs, and I would say, just in general, British-made Premiers might be a great option to look at. Insanely underrated drums that you can get for peanuts a lot of the time. I had an Artist Birch kit I picked up on eBay for around $200. I’ve seen ‘90s Genistas (which some people say sound better than MIJ RCs) sell for as little as $400. And you can also find vintage Premiers for ridiculously cheap sonetimes.
 

JazzyJeff

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I gig my DW Jazz series kit for most shows (traveling in soft cases). However, for gigs in the open with threat of rain - PDP CXs, playing in a gravel parking lot - PDP CXs, dive bars in bad neighborhoods - PDP CXs (those last 2 happen far less nowadays). My point being, having a beater gigging kit is a good idea IMO. No reason to abuse and possibly ruin thousands of dollars worth of drums for one off gigs. It's a risk based thought process.
 

Mongrel

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I vote for cases, too. The closest thing I have to a beater kit is a six piece Catalina Maple, and they stay here at home. My best drums go to gigs. Always. For me it's a question of respecting the music and the audience, and of the pleasure I derive from playing great drums for audiences. The picture below was taken about a month ago. The drums have been gigged regularly since I got them in 2001. Good cases work.

Great instruments are meant to be played.
Somehow that doesn't strike me as a "dive bar" stage...lol.
 

dangermoney

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And yet another vote for cases. I gigged a set of Ludwig CMs in H&B Enduro cases for 15 years and over 1000 gigs, no damage to speak of. I am currently gigging another set of CMs. Play what inspires you ...
 

cplueard

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I'm in between people here it seems. When I only had one kit and it was very nice, I used it or everything. Now my nice kit sits at home (unless recording) while I move around gigging kits. The main reason being that I don't want to tear down and set up a kit twice for every single gig and practice where a kit isn't provided. Get a gigging kit so you spend less time setting crap up and more time playing.

I second finding an old PDP CX or LX Etc, they're great. The old Platinums are awesome too though they tend to run higher in price.
 

Skins_in_the_game

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Listen to me -- Buy USED a Pacific CX or LX model drumset. The best ones are those whose manufacturing date is closest to the year 2000 manufacturing start date. The first year (2000) production have Hard Rock American Maple shells whose wood was chosen from stocks of maple already waiting to be manufactured into DW drums. This wood taken from the DW stocks was then trucked down to the new DW/Pacific plant in Encenada, Mexico and turned into some of the finest drums that DW ever built. Do not doubt me on this.

I cannot imagine a more road-worthy drum set than these. They are build like tanks, and have great tom holders, and all other metal fixtures. And even though prices for these has been going up steadily (The word finally gets around), but you can still buy or assemble a six-piece set for well under $600, and sometimes the seller includes the hardware.

How do they sound? Exactly like DW's standard maple shell drums. Don't believe me? Listen to this: (this is exactly what I hear when I sit down behind my CX kit:


GeeDeeEmm
This would have been it. mint Cx Ensenada set it red sparkle that looked practically new. Came with hardware and Stands. Oh yes and padded Bags for all drums. Ended up selling at auction in VA for 54 dollars!!!! What a steal. They mislabeled it a Gx but you can see the badge close up pic and it shows it as CX and where it was built etc.

 

DanRH

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Also, my vote is to go with the Stage Customs if you want a gigging kit for what it’s worth. Personally not a fan of PDP’s (the oval lugs are a huge turn off for me). I’m sure they sound fine.
 

rondrums51

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I totally understand the whole "gigging set" thing. You're constantly hauling them, a lot of times without cases, playing in venues where they take a beating, so you don't want to spend a fortune, but you still want a decent instrument.

I went with Tama Silverstars. I've played them to death for five years, and they still look brand new. I bought them for workhorse drums, gig after gig, get in and out, get my paycheck. But they sound so good, I've used them on theater gigs and jazz concerts. I have expensive drums at home that I only use 4-5 times a year.

I think Silverstars are discontinued, but the Superstar Classics are the thing now, maple shells instead of birch. You can cop a 5 piece set for $650.

I always thought the "pro" vs. "gigging" drum thing was silly, anyway. I'm playing a $650 drum set vs. a $2,000 drum set, and I'm still a pro.

https://www.guitarcenter.com/TAMA/Superstar-Classic-Custom-5-Piece-Shell-Pack.gc
 

drummers_need_coffee.exe

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Listen to me -- Buy USED a Pacific CX or LX model drumset. The best ones are those whose manufacturing date is closest to the year 2000 manufacturing start date. The first year (2000) production have Hard Rock American Maple shells whose wood was chosen from stocks of maple already waiting to be manufactured into DW drums. This wood taken from the DW stocks was then trucked down to the new DW/Pacific plant in Encenada, Mexico and turned into some of the finest drums that DW ever built. Do not doubt me on this.

I cannot imagine a more road-worthy drum set than these. They are build like tanks, and have great tom holders, and all other metal fixtures. And even though prices for these has been going up steadily (The word finally gets around), but you can still buy or assemble a six-piece set for well under $600, and sometimes the seller includes the hardware.

How do they sound? Exactly like DW's standard maple shell drums. Don't believe me? Listen to this: (this is exactly what I hear when I sit down behind my CX kit:


GeeDeeEmm
Is there a good way to tell what year a set came from, apart from relying on a seller’s say so?
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Is there a good way to tell what year a set came from, apart from relying on a seller’s say so?
Yes. All of the CX/LX kits that were made in Mexico are good kits, keep in mind. So those are the ones to look for. The tags will say Made In Ensenada Mexico. But the ones that we've been able to confirm were made with DW-sourced American Hard Rock Maple were the early 2000 kits. We've been unable to determine when the Mexico plant began receiving their own supplies, but they continued to be advertised as Hard Rock Maple at least thru 2001.

The easiest way to identify these early kits is that they were shipped with the RIMS style mounting system on the mounted toms. Later production kits (2003/04????) were equipped with the DW style mounting system.

Bottom line, though, is that ALL the MIM kits are of great quality. If they've been treated well by previous owners, you can find a lifetime kit from them.

GeeDeeEmm


Early production mounts were similar to these:


Later production (Post-2003 ????) looked like these:
 

drummers_need_coffee.exe

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Yes. All of the CX/LX kits that were made in Mexico are good kits, keep in mind. So those are the ones to look for. The tags will say Made In Ensenada Mexico. But the ones that we've been able to confirm were made with DW-sourced American Hard Rock Maple were the early 2000 kits. We've been unable to determine when the Mexico plant began receiving their own supplies, but they continued to be advertised as Hard Rock Maple at least thru 2001.

The easiest way to identify these early kits is that they were shipped with the RIMS style mounting system on the mounted toms. Later production kits (2003/04????) were equipped with the DW style mounting system.

Bottom line, though, is that ALL the MIM kits are of great quality. If they've been treated well by previous owners, you can find a lifetime kit from them.

GeeDeeEmm


Early production mounts were similar to these:


Later production (Post-2003 ????) looked like these:
Thanks a ton! Does this apply to the MX as well? What I’ve seen is that they’re all the same shells with different hardware and wraps.
 

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