Gluing shells together

Angelo Zollo

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I know you can, but should you glue two 8x16s to make a 16x16. The 2 halves are available and it is cheaper. Will it sound bad?
Silly question but I was just wondering.
 
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JazzDrumGuy

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Crazy idea! I've been meaning to do this with a snare shell to keep the original top and bottom edges but just cut it down a little. My handyman though I was crazy and said just cut off one side and do a new edge.

I think it would work. I don't see why not. I assume the edges that meet are (or will need to be cut) flat? Of course, I'd be worried if you dropped it. Are you going to use a reinforcement ring or center lugs to give it some strength?
 

latzanimal

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If I were to do it, I would cut opposite 45s on the edges to be glued together. More surface area to bond.... with ply shells, depending on their lay up, you may be dealing with end grain which has less area than side or face grain. Think of end grain as if you were holding a bunch of straws, all that open space.
 

davezedlee

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on the bright side, if you don't nail the seam perfectly, you'll only be out 3 shells

what happens if the top is out of round compared to the bottom?
 

Angelo Zollo

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These are all good thoughts. I will investigate this a bit more. It’s not out of the question yet. I want to stain it so I’ll have to see how much he grain patter looks. This will be strictly a travel set so sound trumps appearance
 

Tommy D

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Joining two shells together is how all the steam benders make any drum deeper than 8-9 inches. That's why Craviotto likes to use an inlay on their drums. It hides the seam.

As for why you would do it on a ply shell instead of just buying a shell in the proper depth is a bit if a head scratcher to me, but to each their own.

I mean, it may be fun to have one side be maple and the other side be walnut so you can flip the drum and possibly produce slightly different sounds, but joining two of the same species together is not as fun sounding.
 

amosguy

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I just did this with a couple of 6" (not 16") as an experiment. Original flat edges butt glued. For new perfect shells, they did not mesh together perfectly. I used some wood putty to smooth out the seam as it will be wrapped later. If you are going to try to stain them, be aware you will not know how smooth the seam will be until you do the actual match up. If you were gluing parts of the same shell it might not have that issue.
 

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Deafmoon

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Joining two shells together is how all the steam benders make any drum deeper than 8-9 inches. That's why Craviotto likes to use an inlay on their drums. It hides the seam.

As for why you would do it on a ply shell instead of just buying a shell in the proper depth is a bit if a head scratcher to me, but to each their own.

I mean, it may be fun to have one side be maple and the other side be walnut so you can flip the drum and possibly produce slightly different sounds, but joining two of the same species together is not as fun sounding.
I never knew this. Thanks Tommy.
 


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