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gretsch 20/12/14 for hard rock??

K.O.

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I don't think it much matters in a miked situation. I use 12/14/20 sets all the time for rock. Once they are in the PA they can be as loud or project as much as necessary. I do usually have a 16x16 set up as well but I seldom actually hit it.

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Matched Gripper

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I was thinking Clapton, Johnny Winter, Allman Bros and Canned Heat, etc., but, yeah, Zep would probably fit what he will be playing. I am not familiar with what Sabbath played (I doubt I ever listened to them but may have accidentally heard them.)
You’ve heard Sabbath!


 

mtarrani

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Listen at least half way through.
No, still unfamiliar. Nice grooves on each track, but I do not hear a connection with blues. With Zep I clearly hear the blues influence. Not with Sabbath. But ... I do like the grooves in each song. Tasteful and not at all what I would have expected.
 

Phantomlimb777

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I would go 12/15/20 personally, but yes. Especially with those die cast hoops and some good tuning.
 

Whitten

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It's difficult to step outside norms, unless you are one of the music industry's few icons.
You can do anything with anything in theory - heavy rock with 20, 12 & 14", bebop with 24, 14 and 18", but there IS a reason most jazz drummers are using smaller sized shells and most pro rock/heavy rock drummers are using larger sized shells. It is idiomatic for the sound of the genre.
So IMO, no, I would NOT use 20, 12 & 14 for heavy rock.
The PA system is immaterial, unless you are just using the 20, 12 & 14 to trigger larger sounding samples.
 

GiveMeYourSmallestSticks!

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I think if all you played was Rock and wanted/could afford a dedicated kit, you would probably want to go bigger. For something more versatile though (as you specified in your original post), those sizes can definitely work if not being the "industry standard" or "ideal sizes for Rock". I have a 10, 12, 14, 20 Gretsch Brooklyn kit that I chose for that very reason (I play a variety of genres from Jazz to Blues to Rock to MPB, only have money and space for 1 kit), and it's served me very well.

As has been mentioned earlier, heads and tuning make a huge difference. I recently wanted to get a real deep Rock sound out of the kit, and tuned the drums quite low with reverse dots on the toms. I couldn't believe just how low and thuddy, but still resonant my kit could go, especially having mostly played it with coated Ambassadors at medium and higher tunings for Jazz. The 14" sounds absolutely massive, and is very satisfying to play at a low tuning with that head. Those aren't even proper 2 ply heads, and I'd wager other heads might even help me get even lower if needed. I've played many back line/rehearsal space kits in the larger sizes, and have to say I could get pretty darn close to the sound and feel of those, if not exactly the same thing.

The bottom line being, for pure authenticity, the answer's probably no. For versatility and usefulness, it's a definite yes. Plus you're making the correct choice going with Gretsch ;)
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I use my recently acquired 20/12/14 Gretsch USA Custom for a wide variety of gigs - from Restaurant Acoustic to large room gigs that are amplified . This is the most versatile configuration made IMHO. On occasion I will use the Yamaha EAD 10 and trigger the kit , but typically just a Shure Beta 52A on the bass drum works fine .
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mtarrani

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I use my recently acquired 20/12/14 Gretsch USA Custom for a wide variety of gigs - from Restaurant Acoustic to large room gigs that are amplified . This is the most versatile configuration made IMHO. On occasion I will use the Yamaha EAD 10 and trigger the kit , but typically just a Shure Beta 52A on the bass drum works fine . View attachment 568668 View attachment 568669
Your kit has the same finish (it seems) as the house kit in The Jazz Corner in Hilton Head, SC. My late wife and I were there for the Rosanno Sportiello Trio in September 2021. Here is the great (to me) Eddie Metz playing it. I shot the video so you can tell we had a great table :)

 

JDA

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It's difficult to step outside norms, unless you are one of the music industry's few icons.
You can do anything with anything in theory - heavy rock with 20, 12 & 14", bebop with 24, 14 and 18", but there IS a reason most jazz drummers are using smaller sized shells and most pro rock/heavy rock drummers are using larger sized shells. It is idiomatic for the sound of the genre.
So IMO, no, I would NOT use 20, 12 & 14 for heavy rock.
The PA system is immaterial, unless you are just using the 20, 12 & 14 to trigger larger sounding samples.
agree.
even the 60s Gretsch rock and roll outfit was a 20 2-12s and a 16
as was a few others from the other manufacturers of the time.
Spencer Dryden with Jefferson Airplane Roger Hawkins touring with Traffic back in the day can't recall any using 20 12 14
 
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Tornado

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I just keep thinking about buying a $3-4K drum set and being exited about it "being fine" or "works great if you tune low with the right heads" or "great when mic'd up".

I mean, if you have to have one kit and you're using it for all kinds of stuff, you have to make sacrifices, and maybe the 20,14,12 is the most versatile thing. If so, go for it. That's your path. But maybe it's OK to have more than one kit, and maybe you don't need all of them to be super high end.
 

JDA

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he was the secondary (altho the better) drummer;

Agree with Whitten
at the least add some top and bottom toms if you're going to "hard rock" a 20/12/14.
Need some tonal room to move around; some tones; if the sole drummer not double drumming
 

JDA

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plus if you get into 18" bass drums - or small kits and you're the sole drummer in a hard rock band; you have to work your arse off; to push the small drums..
plus you're not going to have the tom tones to do " Sunshine Of Your Love" or "White Room" when it's called... and it will be.
not to mention inagadddavida is out
 


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