Guitar amp for my rehearsal room ... ??

BennyK

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I'm leaning toward an older Peavey Bandit , something to plug into that's reliable and not too specific sounding, and under 200 canadian on the used market . I recently had a Peavey TNT bass amp laid on me and some other gear too . Am presently running a Behringer Ultra Bass head through an old Yorkville wedge monitor for guitar and even I know that's pretty cheesy .

Thanks
 
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Frank Godiva

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I have a Peavey Studio Pro 40 in my space and Peavey KB 300s for keyboards and bass. Indestructible American muscle
 

midnightsupperclub

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As Frank said, Peaveys, especially the older American ones, are indestructible.

They are also fairly neutral sounding and take very nicely to effects pedals.

Depending on the size of your rehearsal space, you could even go smaller than the Bandit. A Studio Pro or even an Envoy 110 might be loud enough and you can save a bit more cash.

Bottom line - great quality gear, great value and won't burn a hole in your pocket if you look around and find the right deal.
 

DannyPattersonMusic

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Peavey makes good decent sounding gear.

I used a Peavey Bandit (Transtube version) amp for over 10 years before upgrading to a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe and Vox AC15.
 

Elvis

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I'm leaning toward an older Peavey Bandit , something to plug into that's reliable and not too specific sounding, and under 200 canadian on the used market . I recently had a Peavey TNT bass amp laid on me and some other gear too . Am presently running a Behringer Ultra Bass head through an old Yorville wedge monitor for guitar and even I know that's pretty cheesy .

Thanks
I'm a Fender tube amp fan. Mostly the 6V6 amps, but I remember when I played in rock bands a lot of guitarists used or wanted a Peavey Bandit.
I think that's a good choice for what your'e looking for.


Elvis
 

BennyK

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I don't want to blaspheme too deeply and spend more than the price of a half decent used ride cymbal .

Obviously, through my recent visits to amp forums , I'd love to own a Fender tube , but I know it won't end there . Lord knows I have enough fixations . The Bandit is kind of a Plain Jane - dependable, solidly built and unpretentious . I think I'll leave it up to whoever wanders downstairs for a session to get something specific happening with what I've got .

Or bring their own .
 
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chillybase

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I like the Peavey Bandit. It was my first real amp that was large enough to play in the first band I was in. This was the style Bandit I have in the Reverb link (not mine).

I think Elvis Costello played solid state Peavey amps in his early, more punk/new wave era. The Bandit can get a nice 60s/70s funky sound when used with a Cry Baby.
 

BennyK

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This one's a definite maybe - I'm meeting with the seller tomorrow afternoon .

 

Bgood

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If you're leaning toward Peavey I'd go with the Classic 30. Low cost very good bang for the buck. Bandit is cool too.....
 

Lazmo

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The Bandit will do the job for sure, but like Bgood said - "If you're leaning toward Peavey I'd go with the Classic 30. Low cost very good bang for the buck" and it will cover a lot of ground, from clean through to overdrive... and it is the real thing, with real actual tube overdrive.

FYI, I picked up a Laney VC15, for a song at a music store closure, not really knowing what sort of amazing gem I'd lucked upon. It is a very similar design to the Peavey Classic 30, being a foot switchable two channel amp, with Clean and Drive channels, a shared EQ, and 12AX7/EL84 tubes, with real reverb, but the Laney has a Jensen speaker instead of a Celestion. Anyway, the tone of both channels is superb, although at 15 watts, the Clean is overdriving wonderfully at gig levels, it's not clean and I so don't care and the Drive channel does fantastic Marshall crunch at any volume. It sounds great with the guitar plugged straight in, and doesn't need pedals, but I get even more versatility with some nice pedals I have, to kick it up a notch. I particularly love the Clean channel flat out at gigs with an OD pedal for solos, or the Drive channel on 4 at any home volumes. Plexy heaven.

Laney VC15.JPG
 

Stickclick

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This one's a definite maybe - I'm meeting with the seller tomorrow afternoon .

75 watts is freaking loud. Even 25 watts is freaking loud. It takes about 10 watts to compete with acoustic drums.
 

Lazmo

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75 watts is freaking loud. Even 25 watts is freaking loud. It takes about 10 watts to compete with acoustic drums.
Yes 75 watts is loud for sure, but the Bandit is a solid state amp, and it can be run at any volume, because the amps overdrive is artificially produced and does not need to be loud to get the overdrive effect. Solid state amps also need spare headroom, so more power is nice, because a solid state amp that is clipping is not a good sound.

Whereas an all tube amp, actually sounds better when operated at or near its maximum power, because of the natural sweet tone produced by the overdriven tubes. Which is why small tube amps are popular, because you can get them into their overdriven sweet spot without too much ear bleed. My 15 watt Laney can easily keep up with a band when cranked.

So, the Bandit may be a more versatile option as it can operate at any volume and doesn't need to be cranked. The tone won't be as good as an all tube amp, but with some nice effect pedals or a decent multifx, it would do the job.
 

Pounder

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The overdrive is solid state, not digital. Bandit is a great amp for the money. They can be found cheap. They put out plenty of volume. They have a great distortion tone. Peavey in general is under-rated and of high quality.

Your reasoning is sound.

Sure, you could find a classic 30 or other Peavey or other tube amp but you'll still probably be out twice what the bandit costs. For the studio, the Bandit should be an inexpensive worry-free (no tubes to replace etc.) solution. I have played with guitarists who love the sound. Sure, if they get money inevitably they get a tube amp. But I imagine you could upgrade later.
 

DanRH

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I got two Fender Champion 40’s. Under 100 each. Fits the bill just fine.
 

BennyK

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So I am now the proud owner of a Peavey Bandit Solo 75 from 1988 . Cleaned it up and it works like a charm .

Thank for your experience and insights everybody !
 
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