Guitar teacher talks about how changes in music consumption changed his students

Tornado

DFO Master
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
3,403
Reaction score
3,801
Location
Dallas
This topic has come up before, and I've made similar observations. But it's interesting to hear it from a teacher's perspective about how the way people consume music has changed their relationship to both music itself and the people who create it. I think it's worth a watch.

 

Polska

DFO Veteran
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
2,501
Reaction score
1,104
Location
Buffalo NY
He's not wrong. Nameless, faceless music. I'm glad to have grown up when I did, devouring whole albums and then CD's. Building a love for what musicians spent time on. I agree with a lot of what he says, especially how getting everything you want for free seems to make me not really care for or want any of it. I went through that phase and eventually ditched any that was just file clutter that I wasnt ever listening to.

I guess a question for some of those kids is do you really want to play in the first case?
 

studrum

DFO Master
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
3,883
Reaction score
1,221
A thoughtful history. I think his analysis is pretty reasonable. It's got the ups, the downs, and...the ups!
 

Roch

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,930
Reaction score
919
Location
Ottawa Valley, Ontario
I think these days, compared to the way it was in the past, one would consider the way music is consumed now is a form of ADD...we used to put a record on and listen to the same band for 45 minutes...so many B songs that were also favorites that contributed to the overall character of the band or artist...if somebody switched from song to song back then, he would have been told to sit the hell down and leave the records alone..:D
 

Tornado

DFO Master
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
3,403
Reaction score
3,801
Location
Dallas
I think these days, compared to the way it was in the past, one would consider the way music is consumed now is a form of ADD...we used to put a record on and listen to the same band for 45 minutes...so many B songs that were also favorites that contributed to the overall character of the band or artist...if somebody switched from song to song back then, he would have been told to sit the hell down and leave the records alone..:D
The bad thing is, I do the same switching these days. For one simple reason: I can. The technology just enabled our worst tendencies. The remote control did the same thing to TV. Before the remote, our instinct was to watch a single channel because that was better than getting up to change it. Unless you were the kid who was the designated channel changer for your dad, lol.
 

Tornado

DFO Master
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
3,403
Reaction score
3,801
Location
Dallas
A lot of new cars don't have CD players anymore.
I just removed mine. But I do have full albums downloaded to play all the way through if I can keep my finger off the button.
 

Vistalite Black

Ludwigs in the Basement
Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
4,636
Reaction score
2,713
Location
North Carolina
So, according to you guys, it was better when a Foreigner fan had to pay $8 for the “Head Games” album ($26.76, adjusted for inflation) to hear “Dirty White Boy” and “Head Games” on demand — even when the listener had no interest in the filler that made up the rest of the album.
“Modern Day” and “Blinded By Science” were included solely because the format demanded 30 minutes of music, not because those Foreigner album tracks would expand anyone’s musical horizons.
There’s also the experience of my friend who in 1981 got a few dollars on his birthday—a rare event—and splurged on the Red Rider album because he loved “Lunatic Fringe.” He was so furious that every other song on the album “sucked” (his words) that he remains embittered toward Canadians to this day! Won’t even try poutine. Or drink a Molson!
For the listener, being able to choose from among the most in-demand songs — or those that other fans of your favorite artists like most — for $10 or so per month is a far better experience.
 
Last edited:

Tornado

DFO Master
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
3,403
Reaction score
3,801
Location
Dallas
So, according to you guys, it was better when a Foreigner fan had to pay $8 for the “Head Games” album ($26.76, adjusted for inflation) to hear “Dirty White Boy” and “Head Games” on demand — even when the listener had no interest in the filler that made up the rest of the album.
“Modern Day” and “Blinded By Science” were included solely because the format demanded 30 minutes of music, not because those Foreigner album tracks would expand anyone’s musical horizons.
There’s also the experience of my friend who got a few dollars on his birthday—a rare event—and splurged on the Red Rider album because he loved “Lunatic Fringe.” He was so furious that every other song on the album “sucked” (his words) that he remains embittered toward Canadians to this day! Won’t even try poutine. Or drink a Molson!
For the listener, being able to choose from among the most in-demand songs — or those that other fans of your favorite artists like most — for $10 or so per month is a far better experience.
They can't all be winners, VB.
 

funkypoodle

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
2,684
Reaction score
1,119
Location
Québec, Canada
So, according to you guys, it was better when a Foreigner fan had to pay $8 for the “Head Games” album ($26.76, adjusted for inflation) to hear “Dirty White Boy” and “Head Games” on demand — even when the listener had no interest in the filler that made up the rest of the album.
“Modern Day” and “Blinded By Science” were included solely because the format demanded 30 minutes of music, not because those Foreigner album tracks would expand anyone’s musical horizons.
There’s also the experience of my friend who in 1981 got a few dollars on his birthday—a rare event—and splurged on the Red Rider album because he loved “Lunatic Fringe.” He was so furious that every other song on the album “sucked” (his words) that he remains embittered toward Canadians to this day! Won’t even try poutine. Or drink a Molson!
For the listener, being able to choose from among the most in-demand songs — or those that other fans of your favorite artists like most — for $10 or so per month is a far better experience.
Your friend blames our entire country on Red Rider? That's hilarious!!! Please let him know that Hootie & the Blowfish, Metallica, New Kids On the Block & Bud Light are all his fault & that 30 million of us up here send him the stink-eye!
 

el_37

Very well Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Messages
1,426
Reaction score
273
Location
NYC
So, according to you guys, it was better when a Foreigner fan had to pay $8 for the “Head Games” album ($26.76, adjusted for inflation) to hear “Dirty White Boy” and “Head Games” on demand — even when the listener had no interest in the filler that made up the rest of the album.
“Modern Day” and “Blinded By Science” were included solely because the format demanded 30 minutes of music, not because those Foreigner album tracks would expand anyone’s musical horizons.
There’s also the experience of my friend who in 1981 got a few dollars on his birthday—a rare event—and splurged on the Red Rider album because he loved “Lunatic Fringe.” He was so furious that every other song on the album “sucked” (his words) that he remains embittered toward Canadians to this day! Won’t even try poutine. Or drink a Molson!
For the listener, being able to choose from among the most in-demand songs — or those that other fans of your favorite artists like most — for $10 or so per month is a far better experience.
Sometimes- yeah. Spending my hard earned money on duds quickly got me to be very selective about what I would buy and also got me way more into the music in a way.

I also traded away my duds, or sold them to the used record/cd shops that were everywhere back then. You did so at a loss, but if it was a new popular dud you were getting at least 50-60% of your money back, If it was an old dud then you were getting a $1 back...........

But I also remember spending weeks/months to find some album I, or my friends had heard about and then being unbelievably disappointed. Or being rewarded when that album that was import only and had to be sought out- turned out to be a masterpiece. Sometimes that hunt really paid off.

Being able to listen to anything for $10 a month is not always the better experience- although sometimes it is. I watch my daughter and her friends who cannot even begin to dive into anybody's work other then the hits since the access to millions of tracks does that- you just keep searching since you can. I wouldn't sit through an entire album either.

I am curious to see how the music geeks that will eventual appear from the current crop of ten year old kids will consume music. Will they be digging through stacks of LP's in 2030?

There will be tons of all that unopened or played once stuff people bought in 2010-2020 to dig through........
 

studrum

DFO Master
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
3,883
Reaction score
1,221
So, according to you guys, it was better when a Foreigner fan had to pay $8 for the “Head Games” album ($26.76, adjusted for inflation) to hear “Dirty White Boy” and “Head Games” on demand — even when the listener had no interest in the filler that made up the rest of the album.
“Modern Day” and “Blinded By Science” were included solely because the format demanded 30 minutes of music, not because those Foreigner album tracks would expand anyone’s musical horizons.
There’s also the experience of my friend who in 1981 got a few dollars on his birthday—a rare event—and splurged on the Red Rider album because he loved “Lunatic Fringe.” He was so furious that every other song on the album “sucked” (his words) that he remains embittered toward Canadians to this day! Won’t even try poutine. Or drink a Molson!
For the listener, being able to choose from among the most in-demand songs — or those that other fans of your favorite artists like most — for $10 or so per month is a far better experience.
Nah, the artists I bought didn't have that many "duds" on their albums. Most all of it was good, so it was very much worth it.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Messages
840
Reaction score
1,238
Location
Montréal
My daughter is 12, she just took up bass and she's a bulimic for all things music.

She views Vynils as uber-cool retro objects and likes to spend time in the few remaining used/new record stores in our area. It is not unusual for her to listen to music on my turntable and/or browse through my own collection. For Christmas, she even special ordered The Dirty Knobs' album as a gift for me (Tp&The Heartbreakers Mike Campbell's new band).

Of course her main mean of consumption is Spotify, but she uses it to expand her horizon and randomly stumble upon tons of stuff that she wouldn't otherwise ever discover. When I go pick her up at her school for the weekend, she always has 3-4 new songs in her playlist that we listen to on the car ride back to my home. It's now become a tradition. Most are by pretty obscure indie bands, some by most established artists that aren't at all targetting her demographic, such as Tame Impala, Thundercat or Mac DeMarco. Even some "classic Rock" and not only bands that I listen to.

The recent Freddy Mercury biopic really spurred her interest in Queen, a band that I don't listen to that much. But she became a Queen fangirl overnight and learned "under pressure" and "another one bites the dust" on the bass :thumbleft:

She also consumes a lot of Youtube content, a lot of it is bass related, but about music in general as well. One morning I woke up to a familiar voice and much to my surprise, there she was in the living room watching some "greatest albums/songs/solos" list-type of video off of Rick Beato's channel!! And she'd been at it for almost an hour, a 12 y/o, rivetted to her seat, watching a white haired dude talk about songs that were hits from before even I was born!!

Yeah the way the youth consume music is different now. Is it better or worse? It all depends. In my daughter's case, she has a deep curiosity, a thirst for music trivia and discovering old and new sonic scapes. So if you ask her, the internet is a boon...
 

studrum

DFO Master
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
3,883
Reaction score
1,221
My daughter is 12, she just took up bass and she's a bulimic for all things music.

She views Vynils as uber-cool retro objects and likes to spend time in the few remaining used/new record stores in our area. It is not unusual for her to listen to music on my turntable and/or browse through my own collection. For Christmas, she even special ordered The Dirty Knobs' album as a gift for me (Tp&The Heartbreakers Mike Campbell's new band).

Of course her main mean of consumption is Spotify, but she uses it to expand her horizon and randomly stumble upon tons of stuff that she wouldn't otherwise ever discover. When I go pick her up at her school for the weekend, she always has 3-4 new songs in her playlist that we listen to on the car ride back to my home. It's now become a tradition. Most are by pretty obscure indie bands, some by most established artists that aren't at all targetting her demographic, such as Tame Impala, Thundercat or Mac DeMarco. Even some "classic Rock" and not only bands that I listen to.

The recent Freddy Mercury biopic really spurred her interest in Queen, a band that I don't listen to that much. But she became a Queen fangirl overnight and learned "under pressure" and "another one bites the dust" on the bass :thumbleft:

She also consumes a lot of Youtube content, a lot of it is bass related, but about music in general as well. One morning I woke up to a familiar voice and much to my surprise, there she was in the living room watching some "greatest albums/songs/solos" list-type of video off of Rick Beato's channel!! And she'd been at it for almost an hour, a 12 y/o, rivetted to her seat, watching a white haired dude talk about songs that were hits from before even I was born!!

Yeah the way the youth consume music is different now. Is it better or worse? It all depends. In my daughter's case, she has a deep curiosity, a thirst for music trivia and discovering old and new sonic scapes. So if you ask her, the internet is a boon...
Now THAT'S the way to use modern tech as you're becoming a musician. She sounds absolutely focused and dedicated, across many platforms to get what she wants to find out. Her approach is kind of the other half of what the guy in the video said is the ray of hope: there may not be the casual yet "big middle" of young people able to focus on music and practicing etc., but because of YouTube, the true fanatics worldwide can find him.
 

WaggoRecords

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
113
Reaction score
104
What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.

Thank you to the older generations for inventing 45s, popularizing 3 minute songs, inventing music charts, developing radio formats that only played one song per album, etc.
 

5 Style

DFO Star
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
6,791
Reaction score
377
Location
SE Portland, Oregon
The current model certainly does have it's advantages for the listener as so much is available to check out for cheap or free. Still, I remember hearing an interview of some musician on a podcast (I can't for the life of me remember who though) and he brought up an interesting point; he said that despite the access to so much different music a lot of folks seem to use the algorithms to discover music in a way tends to be far less eclectic than what those of us who came up on music that was locked to physical media did. When I bought Led Zep II, though I may have mostly been attracted to just a couple of the more rocking, better known tracks, in order to feel like I was getting my money's with I ended up listening to the whole album and listened to it enough times that I was able to appreciate the lesser well known, lesser characteristic tracks. A kid these days who is first learning about Led Zep likely hears Whole Lotta Love and Rock and Roll, digs those and then uses an algorithm with whatever streaming service they're using and that finds tracks by a multitude of bands that are all in the mold of those couple of songs. Since folks end up hearing a narrower cross section of music (than if they were listening to albums) their influences are then narrower as well... which is likely how copycat bands like Greta Van Fleet come about.

It's really nothing more than a theory, but it does seem to explain some things. I feel like so much of the really contemporary music that I hear (at least in the popular rock/pop spectrum) seems really derivative, as if folks are drawing their influences from a far less brad spectrum than folks typically did in past decades... and the streaming model with it's algorithms and such seems that it might be at least partially to blame. It's kind of a sad irony that though there is so much available to sample, that the technology that makes it all possible can be used to narrow down, rather than to expand tastes...
 
Last edited:

Vistalite Black

Ludwigs in the Basement
Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
4,636
Reaction score
2,713
Location
North Carolina
The current model certainly does have it's advantages for the listener as so much is available to check out for cheap or free. Still, I remember hearing an interview of some musician on a podcast (I can't for the life of me remember who though) and he brought up an interesting point; he said that despite the access to so much different music a lot of folks seem to use the algorithms to discover music in a way tends to be far less eclectic than what those of us who came up on music that was locked to physical media did. When I bought Led Zep II, though I may have mostly been attracted to just a couple of the more rocking, better known tracks, in order to feel like I was getting my money's with I ended up listening to the whole album and listened to it enough times that I was able to appreciate the lesser well known, lesser characteristic tracks. A kid these days who is first learning about Led Zep likely hears Whole Lotta Love and Rock and Roll, digs those and then uses an algorithm with whatever streaming service they're using and that finds tracks by a multitude of bands that are all in the mold of those couple of songs. Since folks end up hearing a narrower cross section of music (than if they were listening to albums) their influences are then narrower as well... which is likely how copycat bands like Greta Van Fleet come about.

It's really nothing more than a theory, but it does seem to explain some things. I feel like so much of the really contemporary music that I hear (at least in the popular rock/pop spectrum) seems really derivative, as if folks are drawing their influences from a far less brad spectrum than folks typically did in past decades... and the streaming model with it's algorithms and such seems that it might be at least partially to blame. It's kind of a sad irony that though there is so much available to sample, that the technology that makes it all possible can be used to narrow down, rather than to expand tastes...
Statements like today’s listeners tend to hear music that is “far less eclectic than what those of us who came up on music that was locked to physical media did”
are unsupportable. My Apple Music subscription gives me access to everything from klezmar jazz to Icelandic metal. In the day of $8 albums $26.83 adjusted for inflation), the only way I’d hear a Miles Davis record is to buy it based only on someone elses’s description of what it sounds like.
Secondly, it’s hard to identify more of a “copycat” band than Led Zeppelin. Zeppelin stole entire songs from Muddy Waters, Albert King, Willie Dixon and Spirit. .
 


Top