Has anybody seen this drum tuner?

lrod1707

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Browsing around I found this:

It's a rapid drum head changer/tuner.
Maybe you have seen it before. I hadn't!
I personally found it hilarious but who knows, maybe it works for somebody.

I also found this one which I had never seen either. This one seems very interesting to me:
https://circularscience.com/
 
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Pimp-a-diddle

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By the time he aligns all of that, my Milwaukee mini has already performed the job.
 

CherryClassic

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LOL!! I'm getting ready to use one very similar; 4 volt Ryobi TEK4, HP53L. Today changing the batter hear on my Supra!!

sherm

PS: I know all that info because it's laying here on my desk. LOL
 

Buffalo_drummer

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I have a Tru Tuner that I bought at NAMM 2 years ago just 'cuz I like gadgets. While it does work, it's tricky to get all the keys facing the same way off the bat so I've mostly not used it. I guess if I spent time working with it it would get easier though.
 

bigbeat

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I have a Resotune II drum tuner. It really works as they say. There is not a lot of online info, but it does something completely different from a Tune Bot which they condescendingly call a "note sniffer." (Note: I own and use a TuneBot). It has 2 speakers and a small mic on the bottom. The drum must be suspended so that both heads are free to vibrate (unlike the TuneBot) The unit sits about 1/4 " above the drum head at a tension screw, suspended by wooden dowels which sit on the rim on one side and small spacers which allows the unit to be placed the same distance from each tension screw. The speakers play varying frequencies into the head. When the whole drum, including both heads, shell, and all hardware, begins to resonate the most at a sympathetic frequency, the mic picks up the fundamental frequency and the higher lug frequency and reads them out, and the unit remembers them both. Then the unit is moved from tension screw to tension screw and plays the lug frequency into the head at that tension screw, and listens for the sympathetic vibration, and tells you to either tighten or loosen the tension screw until the lug is "cleared" by which they mean it is maximumly resonating with the other lugs. This may or may not be the same as the note one reads out on a TuneBot but it is usually close. The unit must be moved around the drum to each tension screw for "clearing." This is time consuming, but the results are worth it for critical work, such as in a studio. This is not a full explanation, and one must see and use the Resotune to fully understand it.
 

lrod1707

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I have a Resotune II drum tuner. It really works as they say. There is not a lot of online info, but it does something completely different from a Tune Bot which they condescendingly call a "note sniffer." (Note: I own and use a TuneBot). It has 2 speakers and a small mic on the bottom. The drum must be suspended so that both heads are free to vibrate (unlike the TuneBot) The unit sits about 1/4 " above the drum head at a tension screw, suspended by wooden dowels which sit on the rim on one side and small spacers which allows the unit to be placed the same distance from each tension screw. The speakers play varying frequencies into the head. When the whole drum, including both heads, shell, and all hardware, begins to resonate the most at a sympathetic frequency, the mic picks up the fundamental frequency and the higher lug frequency and reads them out, and the unit remembers them both. Then the unit is moved from tension screw to tension screw and plays the lug frequency into the head at that tension screw, and listens for the sympathetic vibration, and tells you to either tighten or loosen the tension screw until the lug is "cleared" by which they mean it is maximumly resonating with the other lugs. This may or may not be the same as the note one reads out on a TuneBot but it is usually close. The unit must be moved around the drum to each tension screw for "clearing." This is time consuming, but the results are worth it for critical work, such as in a studio. This is not a full explanation, and one must see and use the Resotune to fully understand it.
Interesting!
2 questions:
1. The unit seems rather large to suspend over a small drum. Will it work on small sizes like an 8" tom?
2. You say it reads vibrations on the whole drum. Do you place it on the batter and tune both batter & reso or do you still have to flip over the drum and place it on the reso as well to tune that side?
 

lrod1707

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I just don't understand why it's so "hard" to tune a drum. If you have a good set of shells and heads, there's really not much to it. Maybe I'm just old and grumpy...
You probably are just old and grumpy!
I'm joking, I don't think a basic tuning is hard but I think what happens for some people is that they want to take tuning to near perfection, so we can see just how good the drum can sound. I think that's also why we experiment with different heads that have different plies, materials etc.
I think the same theory applies with cymbals. Some people buy more, rotate their uses, then sell (or keep some) then do it all over again.
 

shiek_yerbouti

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If you want a tuning aide you can't beat the TuneBot. It will tell you if each lug is even with the others. It will guide you with specific lug tensions to achieve specific pitches at low, medium and high tensions. Trying all of this stuff out will help train your ears in an amazing way. I've been tuning without any tool like this for many, many years and I'm amazed at how much it's helped me fine tune my ears. Finally and perhaps best of all, if you keep track of your pitches and lug tensions for each drum, the tool will help you to very quickly get right back to where you were if change heads or tunings.
 

lrod1707

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If you want a tuning aide you can't beat the TuneBot. It will tell you if each lug is even with the others. It will guide you with specific lug tensions to achieve specific pitches at low, medium and high tensions. Trying all of this stuff out will help train your ears in an amazing way. I've been tuning without any tool like this for many, many years and I'm amazed at how much it's helped me fine tune my ears. Finally and perhaps best of all, if you keep track of your pitches and lug tensions for each drum, the tool will help you to very quickly get right back to where you were if change heads or tunings.
Do you know the difference between the tunebot gig vs. the standard tunebot besides not storing settings? I see it's like $30 less than the standard tunebot and I see it has less buttons and I wonder if it's the same quality. It's cheaper but it looks cheaper too.
 

NickCesarz

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Do you know the difference between the tunebot gig vs. the standard tunebot besides not storing settings? I see it's like $30 less than the standard tunebot and I see it has less buttons and I wonder if it's the same quality. It's cheaper but it looks cheaper too.
I believe the Tunebot Gig is also missing the filter option, resulting in less accurate tuning. I don't own the Gig, so I can't tell if it performs better or worse.

Oh, and to the OP, I've seen that tuner before, but never thought it would really be practical, both in a studio or live setting.
 

shiek_yerbouti

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Do you know the difference between the tunebot gig vs. the standard tunebot besides not storing settings? I see it's like $30 less than the standard tunebot and I see it has less buttons and I wonder if it's the same quality. It's cheaper but it looks cheaper too.
I own the Gig version and I’m very happy with it. There are 2 modes: Absolute and Difference Mode. When Difference Mode is selected it automatically engages the filter. I think the original may have more settings if you want to get deeper than that, but I prefer the simplicity of the Gig model. I didn’t want to get too deep into something fidgety. This device does exactly what I want it to do. I also didn’t care about storing my settings on the device. I write them down on paper - again, just because I believe it’s less fidgety to just write it down than potentially having to bounce around menus and settings.
 

lrod1707

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I believe the Tunebot Gig is also missing the filter option, resulting in less accurate tuning. I don't own the Gig, so I can't tell if it performs better or worse.

Oh, and to the OP, I've seen that tuner before, but never thought it would really be practical, both in a studio or live setting.
Cool Thanks!
 


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