Has Pecan wood been used to make drum shells.

Tigerdrummer

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I dont remember seeing it but maybe I'm wrong. If so I would enjoy hearing your experience with it. And hope you had a happy 4th
 
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EyeByTwoMuchGeer

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DW has made some, but for some reason I thought I remember them saying it is incredibly hard to work with. Maybe I'm confused and it was almond wood. Also, perhaps the DW stuff is just a veneer? Either way:

 

Ghostin one

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I don't know, but strictly speaking, pecan is a type of hickory. So, just guessing it's similar to all the other Carya species.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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The DW kit is a pecan veneer....he says it. Although gorgeous, the demo was overplayed and sounds horrible!

Never seen a whole pecan kit.....
 

tillerva

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Indeed, in my wood industry days pecan and hickory veneers were marketed one and the same they’re so similar.
 

Tommy D

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I have a pecan stave shell from Daville Drumworks. I thinned the shell from 1/2" to 3/8" thick and did all the edges/beds/building of the drum. I think it sounds great.







The only issues I had working with it was that the bits liked to catch the grain a bit and pull the shell a little while I was thinning it out. This rendered milled in re-rings pretty much a no go. Also, because the wood is such a light color, it shows burns really easily, so you have to move fast when cutting it or else the saw/router bit will burn your work and look like crap.
 

SpinaDude

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I have a pecan stave shell from Daville Drumworks. I thinned the shell from 1/2" to 3/8" thick and did all the edges/beds/building of the drum. I think it sounds great.







The only issues I had working with it was that the bits liked to catch the grain a bit and pull the shell a little while I was thinning it out. This rendered milled in re-rings pretty much a no go. Also, because the wood is such a light color, it shows burns really easily, so you have to move fast when cutting it or else the saw/router bit will burn your work and look like crap.
Gorgeous drum! Can you please explain to me how that strainer works?
 

blueshadow

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Wells had at least one steam bent pecan snare available when he had his retirement sale I really wanted it but couldn't pull it off at the time
 

Tommy D

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Gorgeous drum! Can you please explain to me how that strainer works?
Its Pearl's multi-snare strainer. Its a rather finicky thing and doesnt offer a whole lot of adjustability to the snare tension like a standard strainer does, however it does allow you to have 3 different wires that you can use either alone or in combination with eachother. This one drum can have a standard snare sound to it with the snappy style wires or have a slightly drier and deeper sound by switching to the wound wire snares then go crazy and transform in to sounding like a field drum leading an army in to a civil war battle by switching to the simulated gut wired all with no head tension changes. The various options are really cool and I wish more options were available, especially in the snappy style wire. For example, some puresound style wires would be nice to give the drum that standard snare sound but darken the tone a bit from the steel.

Anyway, its cool, but really finicky to get set up and adjusted. Then when it is adjusted, its a set it and forget it affair. The system doesn't adjust tension by pulling up on the wires like a standard strai error. It works more like a parallel strainer system by trying to pull the wires "flatter" across the head. Unfortunately you only have like 1/16" of adjustment to work with. Its okay though. Once its dialed in, its good to go.

EDIT: Also, those blue puresound cords were only on the drum for about 5 minutes. After getting things adjusted ant flipping the strainer on, the wires tried digging in to the snare bed likely resulting in a snare side head being torn. So to prevent that I used the standard Pearl cord that came with the wires. Its much softer and hasn't caused any issues with the snare side head or the snare beds.
 
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SpinaDude

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Its Pearl's multi-snare strainer. Its a rather finicky thing and doesnt offer a whole lot of adjustability to the snare tension like a standard strainer does, however it does allow you to have 3 different wires that you can use either alone or in combination with eachother. This one drum can have a standard snare sound to it with the snappy style wires or have a slightly drier and deeper sound by switching to the wound wire snares then go crazy and transform in to sounding like a field drum leading an army in to a civil war battle by switching to the simulated gut wired all with no head tension changes. The various options are really cool and I wish more options were available, especially in the snappy style wire. For example, some puresound style wires would be nice to give the drum that standard snare sound but darken the tone a bit from the steel.

Anyway, its cool, but really finicky to get set up and adjusted. Then when it is adjusted, its a set it and forget it affair. The system doesn't adjust tension by pulling up on the wires like a standard strai error. It works more like a parallel strainer system by trying to pull the wires "flatter" across the head. Unfortunately you only have like 1/16" of adjustment to work with. Its okay though. Once its dialed in, its good to go.

EDIT: Also, those blue puresound cords were only on the drum for about 5 minutes. After getting things adjusted ant flipping the strainer on, the wires tried digging in to the snare bed likely resulting in a snare side head being torn. So to prevent that I used the standard Pearl cord that came with the wires. Its much softer and hasn't caused any issues with the snare side head or the snare beds.
Thank you for taking the time to explain all of that, Tommy. That's a lot to process. LOL
 


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