Help Joining Cymbal Tube to L Arm

tone-def

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Hi all,

My idea is to combine the two parts pictured for a shell mounted cymbal arm. The fit between the two is snug but not tight, the L arm slides in easily. What do I need to do to secure the two? Is it as simple as drilling a hole in the tube and tapping a wing screw or allen grub screw?

Tube and Arm 2.jpg
 

JazzDrumGuy

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That could work but would be hokey and could damage the tube with weight added??? Try this and be done......maybe sell the L arm and buy this....

Screenshot_20200218-204312.png
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Hi all,

My idea is to combine the two parts pictured for a shell mounted cymbal arm. The fit between the two is snug but not tight, the L arm slides in easily. What do I need to do to secure the two? Is it as simple as drilling a hole in the tube and tapping a wing screw or allen grub screw?

View attachment 427985
What you are proposing is not ideal (better to simply buy a pre-built cymbal arm from Gibraltar, et al), but it will work just fine.

I'd do this: insert the L-arm and drill the two pieces. But instead of using a screw to secure the two pieces, just use an appropriately-sized roll pin. This way, the two pieces will be under constant pressure due to the roll pin being press-fit. If you want to ensure that there is no wobble, simply install two roll pins spaced 1" apart and aligned 180 degrees.

GeeDeeEmm
1582153020171.png
 

thin shell

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What you are proposing is not ideal (better to simply buy a pre-built cymbal arm from Gibraltar, et al), but it will work just fine.

I'd do this: insert the L-arm and drill the two pieces. But instead of using a screw to secure the two pieces, just use an appropriately-sized roll pin. This way, the two pieces will be under constant pressure due to the roll pin being press-fit. If you want to ensure that there is no wobble, simply install two roll pins spaced 1" apart and aligned 180 degrees.

GeeDeeEmm
View attachment 428093
This will work however if there is existing play between the L arm and the cymbal arm this will eventually loosen up.
I would see if there is enough clearance to wrap the L arm with some soda can aluminum to take up any slack and give a good interference fit. The aluminum doesn't have to go all the way around the L arm. You just need enough to prevent any movement between the two parts. If there is then knock it in with a hammer and a block of wood between the hammer and L arm. Then drill and drive in the roll pins.

If there is not enough clearance for the soda can then coat the end of the L arm with JB Weld and insert it in the cymbal arm and allow it to cure. This should keep the L arm from having any free play. Then drill and drive in the roll pins
 

tone-def

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Thanks all for the advice! Was hoping to make use of the random L arms I have and cymbal rods that I kept from various broken and stripped stands. After considering, I've ordered the Gretsch vintage cymbal mount. But...I think I'll give your suggestions a try anyway. I think the roll pin idea is great. In fact I think the upper portion of tube has one installed to connect it to the tilter. That with some added material wedged between the two pieces it should be quite snug and solid. I'll report back on how it goes.

1582215387927.png
 
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thin shell

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Roll pins have been standard practice on drum stands for decades. Either one or two 90 degrees apart as GeeDeeEmm sugested.
 

Splat

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I've done ideas like that before. Best way to do it is use some type of adhesive, ...ala JB Weld, and roll pin. The adhesive keeps the smaller pipe/tube from moving ever so slightly which might come thru the mics if recording or could throw off your cymbal/drum/etc angle. Only thing is it'll be a PITA getting it apart. Most of my stuff I make I know I won't be taking it apart so doesn't matter to me.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Thin Shell has a good idea with the JB Weld. I think I would apply a thick layer to the L-arm before inserting it into the cymbal arm, then use the two roll pins as I pointed out earlier. You might think about removing the cymbal tilter from the cymbal arm, too, as this would allow you to add more JB Weld from the top of the tube, then use a wooden dowel rod to pack the JB Weld in and around the pinned-in roll pins. This will eliminate any chance of wobble.

Oh, and don't forget to pre-align the tiler mechanism before drilling the holes or applying the JB Weld.

GeeDeeEmm
 

tone-def

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It will be a custom job for sure. I don't plan on separating the pieces once in place. Where can I find the pins locally? I don't see any in stock at Home Depot and don't see them listed at all at Lowes unless I'm searching under the wrong key words.

Any special tools or drill bit needed? I don't have a drill press so I'm a little worried about drilling...
 

amosguy

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It will be a custom job for sure. I don't plan on separating the pieces once in place. Where can I find the pins locally? I don't see any in stock at Home Depot and don't see them listed at all at Lowes unless I'm searching under the wrong key words.

Any special tools or drill bit needed? I don't have a drill press so I'm a little worried about drilling...
Both places have them. Ask one of those friendly workers..........
 

Rockin' Billy

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It will be a custom job for sure. I don't plan on separating the pieces once in place. Where can I find the pins locally? I don't see any in stock at Home Depot and don't see them listed at all at Lowes unless I'm searching under the wrong key words.

Any special tools or drill bit needed? I don't have a drill press so I'm a little worried about drilling...
I looked at HD in Pearland Tx. and it showed some at store. Roll Pins Tension Roll Pins Most hardware stores should carry them.
 

burgundy

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once pinned, you will have no left or right movement, better get it right the first tine!
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Auto parts stores carry roll pins, too. There are punches that are shaped specifically for roll pins, but I don't use them. Especially for installation. I just hammer them in. They are made from a very hard steel that won't deform when you drive them in.

You can find guides on the internet that will give you the drill size needed for specific roll pins.

For instance, here's a thread on roll pins and hole sizes:


And there are tons of charts containing the information. For instance:

1582324648660.png


GeeDeeEmm
 

thin shell

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As that thread says, roll pins are sized based on the size of the hole. I recently did some work on an old Ludwig Atlas stand and the roll pins are 1/8" diameter. The original holes were 1/8" and I used an 1/8" drill bit to drill the new holes.

If you use two pins, drill for one and drive in the pin. Then drill the next hole and drive in the second pin. If you don't do this then things could shift and the holes will not be in alignment.
 

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