Help Picking Out a Snare

5 Style

DFO Star
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
6,622
Reaction score
184
Location
SE Portland, Oregon
Not sure I’ve ever spent more than $300 on a snare, to be honest, so $700 would seem like overkill from my perspective. In case it is just the maple, though, have you looked at INDe?
I'm in the same boat. I've owned a number of snares over the years and none have been that expensive. I have checked out some more expensive ones though, on other folks kits and at music stores and though I'll often marvel at how beautiful these things can be I don't really see that these things really offer any better value than stuff that's a lot cheaper. Currently my favorite snare that I've ever owned, one that I've had for years and used a lot, is old wood Ludwig Standard that I bought for just $100. I had to change the strainer as it was a bit bent up and spent something like $25 for an identical new Ludwig one. Other than that though it needed no work to sound great; super-sensitive, crisp, great tome... all I could ever want.

Maybe the best testimonial for this snare is the the fact that I've heard it played by some great players who chose it over some newer, much more expensive, well tuned ones. I helped start a jazz festival in my town, one that would have had it's 7th season this summer, if it weren't for the Covid thing and since I'm a drummer, I've become the defacto drum tech for the event. We have a local drum shop that lends us a kit every year, though since they sell mostly vintage gear, most of the kits have been various vintage things (though more recently they have a new Ludwig bop kit they use for backline), but the snare drums that they lend us are always newer ones and they're always something a bit higher end. They're always metal ones and different brands and models, though to be honest the only one I remember was a newer model Ludwig Supra. Every year though I've brought along my old Ludwig Standard and I always show it to the drummers going on (there's typically 12 bands over the weekend but some drummers do double duty in more than one group) and many of them, say maybe 1/3 choose to play that old chap drum over whatever new, shiny expensive thing that the drum shop has lent out. They'll tap my drum, dig the sound and immediately say, "I'll use that one!" I should say too that these are some of the very best drummers in my town of Porltand, Oregon, with a few players from the greater NW and a smaller few who have flown in for the fest from other places, like NYC. They make that snare drum sound good, I tell you...
 
Last edited:

Bmusic

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
15
Between the Omar Hakim and the Supra, you've covered a large territory .

Keep your ear to the ground for a 14x8 Rogers XP8 Superten maple from the early 80's or the Pearl equivalent in either the Free Floater or regularly lugged model .

FOR EXAMPLE :



First you validate my "nah, I'm good with these two" feelings, and then you put an awesome drum on my radar that wasn't there before. At this point I feel like 2 is the magic number if I go beyond that, I'm gonna need 5 or 6. Which is not cool!
 

SpinaDude

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
919
Reaction score
775
Location
Northwest NJ
First you validate my "nah, I'm good with these two" feelings, and then you put an awesome drum on my radar that wasn't there before. At this point I feel like 2 is the magic number if I go beyond that, I'm gonna need 5 or 6. Which is not cool!
Two is fine...but A HALF DOZEN are great!!!

Why be fine when you can be great?!?!?! :headbang:
 

Bmusic

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
15
Single ply search on reverb

Solid Shell search.

A few options in a cheaper range there that'll be very similar. A solid maple shell with re-rings will get you 90-99% of the way to the sound you want.
Dumb question: aren't solid shell and single ply the same thing?
Dumber question: if an ad doesn't say there are rings, can I tell by looking? I mean, it's those obvious humps on each end of the shell, right?
 

unregisteredalien

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2020
Messages
202
Reaction score
278
Location
Melbourne, Australia
First you validate my "nah, I'm good with these two" feelings, and then you put an awesome drum on my radar that wasn't there before. At this point I feel like 2 is the magic number if I go beyond that, I'm gonna need 5 or 6. Which is not cool!
Story checks out.

I owned precisely two snare drums for the first 20 years of my drumming life. One metal, one wood. I was happy.

Last year I bought #3. This year I bought #4 and #5. I've picked out #6 and I have a distant eye on #7 and #8.
 

cplueard

Very well Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Messages
524
Reaction score
149
Location
AZ
Dumb question: aren't solid shell and single ply the same thing?
Dumber question: if an ad doesn't say there are rings, can I tell by looking? I mean, it's those obvious humps on each end of the shell, right?
Neither of these questions are dumb.
Yes, solid shell and single ply are the same thing. If that's what you're shopping for it's always helpful to look for both because some people will only use one of the two terms when posting, especially of you're shopping used. Another reason being that using the phrase "this is a solid shell" (quality) and "this is a solid shell" (specifying single ply) does happen. The two lowest priced snares listed under the "solid shell" search are actually ply snares, they're just using "solid" as a term of quality.

You can always tell if there are rings if they took proper pictures. You'll look for what you described, a bump or thicker area at the edges of the shell.

No Rings:


Rings:

 

Bmusic

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
15
Thanks everybody; this has been incredibly helpful. I now think size is everything, and I’m directing my thoughts toward drums 6.5” or bigger. I actually hadn’t considered anything as big as 8” until BennyK hipped me to that Rogers SuperTen. And I’m also thinking solid maple and re-rings (but of course neither of those are attributes of the Rogers).

Basically, I’ve realized it doesn’t have to be a Craviotto to give me what I want. But deep is good, especially as it contrasts with what I’ve already got.
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,696
Reaction score
1,913
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
BAH! Puny humans and your tiny 14x8 snare drums...geet a REEEEELLLLL Snare drum!.....

...14x10!!!!

Premium_14X10_ToneControl_Throwoff.jpg

1601599252115.png


...:king::sunny::headbang:
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,696
Reaction score
1,913
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
You know that OCDP is owned by Guitar Center now right? They contract other companies to make the drums and put OCDP on them.
No, I did not know that. Thanks for the tip.
So they're basically a "Zombie Company" now?
...sad.
Still, that is a nice looking snare drum I alluded to. At that price, I wouldn't mind owning it, even if it was made overseas.

1601599655383.png


Elvis
 

cinemadrummer2001

Very well Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2008
Messages
920
Reaction score
84
Location
Crete,IL
I’m not sure if you’re only interested in a wood snare but the best snare I have ever played is a Ludwig 6-1/2”x14” hammered bronze supraphonic. The hammered bronze shell is very easy on the eyes too. Mine is from the mid 1990’s and was not too pricey.
 

duvet

New Member
Joined
Feb 29, 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
I'm in the same boat. I've owned a number of snares over the years and none have been that expensive. I have checked out some more expensive ones though, on other folks kits and at music stores and though I'll often marvel at how beautiful these things can be I don't really see that these things really offer any better value than stuff that's a lot cheaper. Currently my favorite snare that I've ever owned, one that I've had for years and used a lot, is old wood Ludwig Standard that I bought for just $100. I had to change the strainer as it was a bit bent up and spent something like $25 for an identical new Ludwig one. Other than that though it needed no work to sound great; super-sensitive, crisp, great tome... all I could ever want.

Maybe the best testimonial for this snare is the the fact that I've heard it played by some great players who chose it over some newer, much more expensive, well tuned ones. I helped start a jazz festival in my town, one that would have had it's 7th season this summer, if it weren't for the Covid thing and since I'm a drummer, I've become the defacto drum tech for the event. We have a local drum shop that lends us a kit every year, though since they sell mostly vintage gear, most of the kits have been various vintage things (though more recently they have a new Ludwig bop kit they use for backline), but the snare drums that they lend us are always newer ones and they're always something a bit higher end. They're always metal ones and different brands and models, though to be honest the only one I remember was a newer model Ludwig Supra. Every year though I've brought along my old Ludwig Standard and I always show it to the drummers going on (there's typically 12 bands over the weekend but some drummers do double duty in more than one group) and many of them, say maybe 1/3 choose to play that old chap drum over whatever new, shiny expensive thing that the drum shop has lent out. They'll tap my drum, dig the sound and immediately say, "I'll use that one!" I should say too that these are some of the very best drummers in my town of Porltand, Oregon, with a few players from the greater NW and a smaller few who have flown in for the fest from other places, like NYC. They make that snare drum sound good, I tell you...
are
 

duvet

New Member
Joined
Feb 29, 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
are snare drums like hand bags to a woman ,to some guys,you can't have too many
 

5 Style

DFO Star
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
6,622
Reaction score
184
Location
SE Portland, Oregon
are snare drums like hand bags to a woman ,to some guys,you can't have too many
Yeah, I'm getting to feel like I'm that way with stereo speakers. I only have a hookup for two sets and I sell ones that I'm not using so it isn't like I'm sitting on a ton of these things, but I keep upgrading. Some years ago though I pretty much got off of the collecting/upgrading train for drum gear though. I began to feel like what I had was working well enough for the kinds of stuff that I was likely to use it for (I don't need another set of gear for thrash metal, for example because I'm never going to play that kind of thing) and I was feeling like what I was needing to level up on was really my skills and not so much the gear. I feel like if I really improved my skills that I'd likely would still be OK with my gear... I wouldn't outgrow it.
 


Top