Hi hat and posture

avedisschwinn

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I'm taking lesson for the first time in decades. (via Zoom at this point) My teacher suggested that my hi hat sound could be crisper, and asked me to play heel up more of the time. I've been playing a two legged hi hat and realize it doesn't feel that solid. Anyone know any tricks for making a two legged stand steadier?

Also with my heel up, I can sit up a bit straighter. Do any of you use thrones with back rests? Does that help?

Lastly, this seems strange but I'm thinking of somehow putting a block on the heel of my hihat to raise my heel without having to hold it up, which feels weird. Has anyone made something like that?
 

Hop

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Anyone know any tricks for making a two legged stand steadier?
Is that stand on carpet? If it's on carpet, move the stand to a surface that isn't carpet and see it the stand becomes more stable.
In my experience I've found the higher the "pile" the less stable the stand will feel.
 

ARGuy

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I have a throne with a backrest most of the time, but I don't use it while I'm playing. I think your posture should remain the same whether you're playing heel up or heel down. So, I would suggest sitting up straighter no matter what. I wouldn't get into any gimmicks to get around holding your heel up. Just play that way and let your body adjust to it. The idea of playing heel up is to put more weight on your left leg to get a crisper sound, and to be able to get a rhythmic motion going. What styles of playing are you studying?
 

cworrick

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See post #12

 

lrod1707

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I posted this last year and it works great to counterweight & stabilize my cymbal stands. It might work for you on the 2 legged hi-hat stand. Also, have you considered getting a 3 legged stand with a rotating base? I bought these 5lb. dumbbells and tied them with heavy duty tie wraps. They are on so tight that they don't move no matter what. Not the prettiest thing but it works. It would be great if a company like Gibraltar could come out with something similar that is specifically made for stands. Something that would be more aesthetically correct.
IMG_20190930_223032 (1).jpg
 
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Seb77

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I would dispute the idea you need to keep the heel up in rder to get a crisp closed hh sound. You can vary the pressure while still resting your leg on the heel.That way, you can also open the hh immediately without having to come down first.
Maybe check the distance of the pedal from the seat;your lower leg should be extended slightly out, but not too much. Also check the spring tension of the hh stand, imo it should be just tight enough to keep the top cymbal open.
Other sources for sloppy closed hh sound could be the clutch or tilter.
 

mebeatee

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Lastly, this seems strange but I'm thinking of somehow putting a block on the heel of my hihat to raise my heel without having to hold it up, which feels weird. Has anyone made something like that?
No not strange....I had a student who could not get his feet comfortable on the kit and we tried everything...different bd and hat pedals, seat heights, different sized bass drums and hi hat cymbals, distance from the pedals et al....
One day he bought in some wooden blocks of different sizes and said he had tried them at home and they helped. There was nothing abnormal in his leg/ankle/foot structure....just was comfy....for him.
Again like in your situation, I stressed the heel up on the hi hat and ironically he was able to play heel up as his centre of balance was found. I tried the blocks and almost fell off....
bt
 

RIDDIM

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I'm taking lesson for the first time in decades. (via Zoom at this point) My teacher suggested that my hi hat sound could be crisper, and asked me to play heel up more of the time. I've been playing a two legged hi hat and realize it doesn't feel that solid. Anyone know any tricks for making a two legged stand steadier?

Also with my heel up, I can sit up a bit straighter. Do any of you use thrones with back rests? Does that help?

Lastly, this seems strange but I'm thinking of somehow putting a block on the heel of my hihat to raise my heel without having to hold it up, which feels weird. Has anyone made something like that?
You could angle the legs slightly toward you, just enough so the high hat digs in to the carpet.

Caveat - the reason I don't use 2 legged high hats any more is that if I'm playing uptempo 8ths with the HH foot, sometimes the high hat starts rotating. I've not had it fall over, but things have gotten interesting - near misses on the snare, etc. After a few instances of that , I switched to 3 legged high hats with rotatable bases. No problems since.
 

jskdrums

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Without reading every reply...DW 2 leg stands are the worst IMO & sadly it doesn't matter which model..5K..9K...They just flop all over the place... Tama's 2 leggers are far more stable & the only 2 leg models I've found to be reliable & stable regardless of where you gig em...YMMV :)
 


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