Home recording drum tracks -advice please

firefirehead

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I'm beginning to get ready to record drum tracks for 2 different bands I am in. Both are rock/metal genres. I'm recording a Mapex Saturn walnut/birch. Below are the mics I currently have set up.

Kick - AKG D112 inside about 4" from the beaters.
Snare - KAM ST2 on top and bottom
T1 - Audix D1
T2 - Audix D2
FT1 - Audix D2
FT2 - Audix D4
XY OH - Rode NT5 pair

My plan is to record the tracks and blend the sounds with Steven Slate Trigger sounds. I noticed my current setup is picking up a lot of snare. I'm hoping to get more cymbal and less drums through the overhead, but I'm wonder if I would be better off capturing the whole kit?

Other mics I have available...
Rode NT1A
2x Shure Beta 58
Shure SM7B
3x MXL 991
Behringer C-2 pair

I appreciate any advice!
 

Ox Han

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Recording drums in your own home is the most difficult objective in DIY recording I think. So many variables like room acoustics and mic phase issues

Could you post what you're capturing with your current set up?
 

firefirehead

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Recording drums in your own home is the most difficult objective in DIY recording I think. So many variables like room acoustics and mic phase issues

Could you post what you're capturing with your current set up?

This is what I have off hand. It's a quick demo we did. Not a raw recording by any means.
 

Tornado

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Mic placement. Move them around until you are picking up what you want to pick up. The XY setup you are using might not be optimal here, if you went split pair, you could position the overheads more over the cymbals and further away from your snare. I like an XY positioned above my head because I get less cymbals in my home recordings that way, so I'd do something else if that's not what I wanted.
 

bpaluzzi

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In backbeat-based music, you're ALWAYS going to get a ton of snare in your overheads. As Tornado said, spaced-pair can help, but you're still going to get snare. You can't EQ it out, as there's too much overlap between the cymbals and snare. You may be able to get a better balance in the mics by choosing louder cymbals (or a quieter snare), or just back off the snare volume manually. Live and recording are often two very different beasts.
 
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Ox Han

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I'm beginning to get ready to record drum tracks for 2 different bands I am in. Both are rock/metal genres. I'm recording a Mapex Saturn walnut/birch. Below are the mics I currently have set up.

Kick - AKG D112 inside about 4" from the beaters.
Snare - KAM ST2 on top and bottom
T1 - Audix D1
T2 - Audix D2
FT1 - Audix D2
FT2 - Audix D4
XY OH - Rode NT5 pair

My plan is to record the tracks and blend the sounds with Steven Slate Trigger sounds. I noticed my current setup is picking up a lot of snare. I'm hoping to get more cymbal and less drums through the overhead, but I'm wonder if I would be better off capturing the whole kit?

Other mics I have available...
Rode NT1A
2x Shure Beta 58
Shure SM7B
3x MXL 991
Behringer C-2 pair

I appreciate any advice!
I'm not hearing "too much snare" in your music example, but two suggestions to get less snare in your OH. Play more balanced, or hit snare less hard in other words. Two, lightly compress the overheads which will push the snare down in volume to further balance the kit. Just don't over do the compression.

In the example you posted, the kick isn't clear and centered and even the snare could be more focused. I want to say it might be phase related, but it's hard to know just by listening. Most important is to make sure your overheads are in phase with each other. Then, make sure your close mic'd drums are in phase with the overheads. You can check by hitting the phase buttons on the mic preamps, if they have them, and do a test recording to compare. Or, use a plugin that has the ability to flip phase. If you flip phase and the drums sound more up front, clear and focused, then they were out of phase. The overhead mics should be in phase with each other without engaging the phase buttons. The close mics, if out of phase, can just have the phase reverse engaged on the pre/plug in.

Alternatively, or even additionally, you could align the tracks in your DAW so the transients are all in phase. Either way gets it done

I hope that helps
 

charlesm

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In the traditional close-miking sense, as you're setting up here, the idea IS really to have the OH mics picking up an image of the entire kit. The close mics are then blended in for punch and presence as needed. It's not that the OHs are only for cymbals and the close mics are only for drums, with as much dry isolation as possible (with the exception of the kick mic sometimes). I think that's a misconception that a lot of people have. It's always a matter of balancing, working with the bleed to create an overall "picture" of the kit, and using eq as necessary when there are frequency issues.

In short, expect some bleed and work with it. Those OHs are supposed to be picking up a decent amount of snare and toms.
 

Ray Dee Oh King

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Room treatment, room treatment, room treatment. Cant express this enough when recording. Mic placement.....the higher you put your OHs, the less "drums" and more cymbal sound youll capture. The closer, the more drums sound youll get. The way you eq and compress your OHs will also determine the sounds coming out. Keep moving your OHs til you find the sound you're looking for.
 

RIDDIM

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In backbeat-based music, you're ALWAYS going to get a ton of snare in your overheads. As Tornado said, spaced-pair can help, but you're still going to get snare. You can't EQ it out, as there's too much overlap between the cymbals and snare. You may be able to get a better balance in the mics by choosing louder cymbals (or a quieter snare), or just back off the snare volume manually. Live and recording are often two very different beats.
Amen! Learning to mix oneself may take a minute, but the mics don't lie.
 

Pat A Flafla

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Without significant treatment expenditures, you won't get a studio-slick sound. A healthy home studio perspective is to prioritize character of the whole over perfection of each separated unit, and where you set up will influence this to a massive degree.
 


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