How are closing jazz clubs changing the music and the profession?

poetman

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NYC's The Jazz Standard has closed; Birdland just announced it is in imminent danger of having to follow suit. LA's Blue Whale closed. I know so many local clubs who do not get the press already have, or will soon, close. How do you think all these closing will affect the music and musicians? Since the golden age of the music, clubs have steadily declined, and in jazz, live music--more than studio recordings--constitutes more of the identity of the music. What is in the future? How will clubs closing affect the music? Will streaming concerts become a thing? YouTube concerts? Will the US see a future without clubs? Just curious how others think the closing of jazz clubs will impact the music.
 

dsop

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How will clubs closing affect the music?
How has classical music been affected by closing concert halls? Even though music schools seem to graduate more and more students each year, there doesn't really seem to be a way for them to ply their wares aside from street busking and social media nonsense. Most music being streamed doesn't even use real musicians. It hasn't for years. Maybe the Beatles Get Back documentary will suddenly inspire a desire to see and hear real musicians.
 

JimmySticks

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Wow, The Birdland closing would be a crusher! But they, and all the other clubs here in NYC, have pretty much been closed for 10 months now, so I’m actually surprised they’ve made it this long.

I honestly don’t see a future for many things in our cities since the closures have been so draconian and the crime rate and violence is so dramatically bad, it will keep people and business’s away and looking for greener pastures. People (club patrons?) are getting out, and that’s unfortunately a fact for our great cities, so I think we’re seeing a life changing migration that will leave our cities barren and forlorn, like the 70’s. I’m a lifelong New Yorker, and I’m very pessimistic for the future of the arts and music here and for our future in general.
 

pgm554

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If you've never had something ,you won't miss it.
 

mebeatee

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Where have you been for the last couple of decades regarding the closure of "clubs"...not only jazz clubs/venues but venues of all kinds.....yeeesh...
This ain't nothing new for a myriad of reasons, and has been exacerbated hugely this past year.
This covid stuff is yet another nail (well a huge spike) in the coffin so to speak...but this means everyone will have to go and buy crowbars.
bt
 

What It Is

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This is going to be a challenge for many major cities (NYC/Chicago/LA). Holding on to these clubs, not just jazz either, will require reassessing property values and property taxes. I don't see that happening as prime property will be gobbled up by chains and other multi-million dollar ventures. Music won't stop. Mid-size/small-size cities will see clubs blossom by offering better real estate values and perhaps satisfy a changing population that is also leaving big cities. Already seeing the impact in Illinois as many Chicago restaurants, club owners, brew pubs are changing the make-up of the suburbs. Jazz clubs are becoming more plentiful in the burbs than in the city.
 

BennyK

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" gonna move up to the country and paint my mail box blue ."

Urban music will increasingly continue to reflect things some of us don't want to hear about no more.
 

Targalx

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I love jazz and I listen to it daily. I have been playing jazz drums for nearly 30 years in various combos (and some big bands). But I am inclined to think it's becoming a lost art. Jazz supporters are unfortunately dying off and there aren't enough youngsters to replace them.

I see it at my own jazz gigs, which have decreased over the past 15 or so years. With the decrease in support brings the decrease in venues.
 

JimmySticks

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Hey bpaluzzi, I notice you really make good use of the laughing emoji. I’m not sure what I said that was so funny, but if you disagree, please try and verbalize your issues. This is a forum after all.
 

bpaluzzi

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jaymandude

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Will it change the music ? The music always changes

I think being a full time musician is going to be even more difficult. It won’t be impossible, just more difficult. Things will come back eventually, how long that takes is anyone’s guess. Right now folks are all looking around tryjng to figure out what the next move is, which is an incredibly difficult thing to consider.
But a career as a jazz musician ? Change the profession ? Who are we talking about ?
 

dcrigger

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Over the past decade or more - we have been seeing sweeping changes in how music is consumed, how it distributed (sold), how it's promoted.... all of these big changes will obviously have a serious effect on the entire landscape....

That said - that's sort of as it ever was.

Things change.

You mentioned the Blue Whale in LA. That club opened in 2009. It's a baby. Baked Potato has been there since 1970. Donte's opened in '66 - closed in '88. Clubs come and clubs go.

The lion's share of the clubs I started my career in - the majority of clubs the Don Ellis band would play are long since gone. Only to be replaced by new ones later on.

And that's just ignoring what's happening now with the pandemic - and rightfully so, as it is some degree of a temporary situation. Places will fail from it for sure. But as demand returns, so will some crazy person that thinks opening a jazz club is a sane undertaking. There always seems to be someone that wants to take that on. God bless 'em.

Will there still be streaming concerts in the future - sure I have no doubt. Moving musicians around costs a fortune - and playing for a limited size audience makes that a harder and harder investment. But live music won't go away - people like the hang, the date-night aspect, the drinking, the trying to hook up. Our big screens and home theater sound has made it desirable to stay at home a lot - but all the time??? I don't believe that works for most people....

Now getting them to come out and hear jazz - well there's the challenge. But again, that's no different now than it ever was.
 

Ian S

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Well said. ^^

As soon as they feel safe enough to do so and restrictions are lifted on normal activity, people will be climbing the walls to go see jazz or a concert in the park.. and at that point I can imagine a really healthy surge in live music scenes around the world.
 

Matched Gripper

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Well said. ^^

As soon as they feel safe enough to do so and restrictions are lifted on normal activity, people will be climbing the walls to go see jazz or a concert in the park.. and at that point I can imagine a really healthy surge in live music scenes around the world.
Positive thinking!
 


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