How Different Should Your Left Side Ride Be?

Seb77

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I and probably others devote a lot of effort to choosing a main ride. But after I do that and am forced to choose a left side cymbal that's different, I'm in the position of having to choose a cymbal I don't like as much.
Why is that? If you like the main ride so much, why not play that one all the time, and get a nice crash for the left? Or, if you don't like to ride the main cymbal all the time, what sound are you hearing then? Listen to the band - what kind of sound complements, say, piano or guitar even better than the main ride? To me it's a higher, washier, smaller cymbal, and I like those sounds just as as much, they fit in the music beautifully.
 

BennyK

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Both are strong within their voices . A 22 will cause you to play differently than 20 , keep that in mind , the same way two different shoes will make you walk differently .

The K seems more authourative. Unless you make a conscious effort to adjust your touch between them, you may subliminally try to get the same reaction out of one or the other, which of course isn't the point of having two rides . First generation EAKS have a flatter profile which creates a unique dispersal . Same with very early Sabian HH's .

Size and shape of the bell, lathing pattern and weight are decisive when considering a tonal interval between two rides.
 

bongomania

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I love to experiment with different pairings, in different contexts. I found one pairing that sounded perfect together when I was at home, beautiful complimentary tone at an interval of a fourth, very musical; but when I listened back to a gig recording, I couldn't tell them apart! Similarly, a big crash that sounds too brash in combo with some of my "prettier" cymbals at home, sounded sweet and natural in the gig recording.

One combo that has worked well for me is a flat with clear crisp stick, and a washier crashable ride. What I'm experimenting with right now is a deep dark medium ride and a somewhat heavyish bright pingy ride. Both crash well, but the crashes are "too much" at home; I'm thinking at the gig those crash sounds will blend better. Gigs coming up in a couple of weeks will tell.
 

funkypoodle

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If you are mostly recording
I love to experiment with different pairings, in different contexts. I found one pairing that sounded perfect together when I was at home, beautiful complimentary tone at an interval of a fourth, very musical; but when I listened back to a gig recording, I couldn't tell them apart! Similarly, a big crash that sounds too brash in combo with some of my "prettier" cymbals at home, sounded sweet and natural in the gig recording.

One combo that has worked well for me is a flat with clear crisp stick, and a washier crashable ride. What I'm experimenting with right now is a deep dark medium ride and a somewhat heavyish bright pingy ride. Both crash well, but the crashes are "too much" at home; I'm thinking at the gig those crash sounds will blend better. Gigs coming up in a couple of weeks will tell.
I haven't used a LS ride in a while, but back when i did (in the 90's) it was a 602 blue label medium flat ride paired with a 2002 heavy ride. These days it's been either a 20" 60's light, washy A ride or a 20" K Ride. I just came home with a 70's Canadian A flat ride early this afternoon and pairing it with the 60's light, washy A ride works like a charm. It's got the shimmer & stick definition of the 602, but resides in the tonal universe of Zildjians. It leaves so much more room for my crashes to wash. The K Ride paired with the flat A was much more redundant, too close in pitch, but the combo was like having a flat ride plus it's bell.

Funny how I initially read your post this morning while trying to convince myself not to snag that ride. I "accidentally" ended up in front of that pawn shop a few hours later :clock:
 

Old Drummer

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Why is that? If you like the main ride so much, why not play that one all the time, and get a nice crash for the left? Or, if you don't like to ride the main cymbal all the time, what sound are you hearing then? Listen to the band - what kind of sound complements, say, piano or guitar even better than the main ride? To me it's a higher, washier, smaller cymbal, and I like those sounds just as as much, they fit in the music beautifully.
I'm a victim of my past, the first 20 years of which involved playing a 20" A on the right and an 18" Paiste 602 on the left--although I never liked the Paiste. What I liked was having a second ride to change to when there was a change in the song.

To oversimplify, I'll typical play the hats during verses and a ride during the chorus and leads, though sometimes a song seems to call for playing a ride during the verses and then switching to another ride during choruses and leads. Of course, there are also other song changes that call for a change of ride cymbals.

With you, I think I want my alternate ride (left-side) cymbal to be higher, washier, and smaller, although I'd add brasher. Unlike you, though, I don't really like those cymbal sounds. I like the change of sound they provide, and wouldn't like to go without the ability to switch rides to effect that change, but I don't especially like that ride cymbal sound. If I get a left side cymbal that I like, it ends up sounding so much like my main ride that switching to it doesn't change the ride sound enough to be worth the switch.
 

rdumas

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I love this idea. If I absolutely don't trust myself to drill the rivets myself, how would I go about this? Something a local drum shop would do? It's just such a lovely cymbal I don't want to wreck it.
Just throw a BFSD bling ring or Big Fat Neck Tie on it....no drilling and you get a nice effect.
 

lordkoos

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I agree that the character of the two cymbals are too similar, I would try something a little smaller and higher pitched on the left. It doesn't have to be an expensive cymbal either.
 

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