How do I cut inlays into a bass drum hoop???

scottiedoo

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got 2 pairs of hoops that I'm wanting to make match the vintage ludwig drums they're on... any info on this would be greatly appreciated....
 

jrfrond

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If you don't have a router & router table have someone else do it.


Dave Huffman
Yeah, pretty much. This is a precision process, and if the groove isn't straight and doesn't line up all the way around, you've got problems. You don't get a second chance, which is especially important if cutting vintage hoops that had no inlays.

I use a 1/2" piloted rabbeting bit that cuts to a depth of 1/16", which is standard. A 1/2" cut, like Ludwig inlays, takes one pass. 3/4" takes two passes. I always go SLOW for accuracy. Again, no problems with a router table.
 

scottiedoo

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I have a friend who is a professional luthier (sp?) he's got a nice workshop. was planning on hitting him up for a favor.. just wondering on the specifics.. thanks a bunch jr.. you're always right on point with this stuff... I hope he's got a table.. if not, I think I may build something myself in my new garage.. (got some extra room now :occasion5: ) I'd like to be able to cut bearing edges too.. how big of a table would you have to make to cut on a big drum.. like a 26"??? does it need to be as big as the diameter of the shell you're working on?
 

jrfrond

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My router table is 4' x 5', mounted on three sets of industrial steel legs and bolted to the concrete floor AND wall. Bigger and stable is always better, and most commerical router tables are not made to handle the function of cutting bearing edges on drums.
 

scottiedoo

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I'd like to see a pic of a real "drum builder's" router table.. one made of granite or thick glass I think would be cool.. you could use it to check the flatness of the edges too. I seriously wanna build something here..
 

scottiedoo

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one other thing.. (& this may have been discussed here before) but say you were recutting the edges on a wrapped vintage ludwig drum... how do you get a clean edge in places like at the seam for instance, where the overlap is.?? wouldn't the bearing of the router bit just transfer the profile of the overlap onto the wood edge of the drum?? you obviously don't want that.. I'm confused... <_<


I know JR has stated that he doesn't do the inner cut on old ludwigs cause it's like a roller coaster anyways.. just wondering how you would compensate for the outer edge.. seems you'd have the same "roller coaster" issue at the seam as well..
 

jrfrond

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Yes, the router does follow the outer seam and create a bump, but I clean it up with a few passes of a smooth file before fine sanding the edge. You'd never know it was there.
 

donaldshultz

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Yeah, pretty much. This is a precision process, and if the groove isn't straight and doesn't line up all the way around, you've got problems. You don't get a second chance, which is especially important if cutting vintage hoops that had no inlays.

I use a 1/2" piloted rabbeting bit that cuts to a depth of 1/16", which is standard. A 1/2" cut, like Ludwig inlays, takes one pass. 3/4" takes two passes. I always go SLOW for accuracy. Again, no problems with a router table.
Hi John- I have a question for you please. I bought an Amana rabbiting bit (1/2") with a bearing that sets it at a 1/16" deep cut. Problem is, the top of the collet is contacting the hoop first. Do you have a router bit with a longer shank? How do you get around this dilemma? Thanks, Don.
 

K.O.

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I did some on a table saw. They turned out perfect but it took some doing. We had to create a jig that was the width of the hoop. Then we had to set the special blade to the perfect height and cut a slot thru the jig for it to come through. When it was all said and done it worked perfectly and was a very straightforward procedure, but my Dad did most of the critical set-up and he is no longer with us so I doubt I could recreate the process.
 

jccabinets

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I did some on a table saw. They turned out perfect but it took some doing. We had to create a jig that was the width of the hoop. Then we had to set the special blade to the perfect height and cut a slot thru the jig for it to come through. When it was all said and done it worked perfectly and was a very straightforward procedure, but my Dad did most of the critical set-up and he is no longer with us so I doubt I could recreate the process.
Kevin your dad is smart because I do my inlays on the table saw with dado blades and it works wonderful.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I don't have a table saw, just a circular saw (heck I don't even have a jig saw...loser!). I've seen YT vids where crafty folks are able to mount one upside down and make a homemade "table saw" but I don't have the motivation.

I've wondered, though, if I could rig something for my Dremel (which I LOVE, btw) so that I could cut things like hoop inlays and shell inlays.....that would be awesome! And probably way less dangerous if it got loose!
 

ARGuy

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Hi John- I have a question for you please. I bought an Amana rabbiting bit (1/2") with a bearing that sets it at a 1/16" deep cut. Problem is, the top of the collet is contacting the hoop first. Do you have a router bit with a longer shank? How do you get around this dilemma? Thanks, Don.
Please be aware that the post you're quoting is from almost 9 years old, and there aren't a lot of members from that era that are still active here.
 

tdcrjeff

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Please be aware that the post you're quoting is from almost 9 years old, and there aren't a lot of members from that era that are still active here.
And he was last here Mar 19, 2015.
 

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