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How do I fix my inaccurate perception of reality?

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I've been recording everything and listening back critically to analyze what went well, and what didn't. I will often hear things that sound off, but I don't recall it sounding that way during the performance or rehearsal. Sometimes after going over it I realize it's other players rushing something that makes me sound late or something like that, but it's as often my fault as someone else's. Mostly timing related problems, two notes too close together, a 16th that was more swung than straight, coming out of a fill too fast, etc. So I can obviously be mindful of that section the next time around, but if I don't hear it, what can I do? Is it just a momentary lapse in concentration? Like, if I had been paying more close attention, would I have heard it? I thought I was paying close attention though? This is obviously something I want to fix...but I'm not sure how to go about addressing the root of the problem, or even sure of what the root of the problem actually is. My hyper-awareness (bordering on neuroticism) about this stuff is a relatively recent thing...is it just a matter of time before I hear the improvements I want to make? What I'd like to hear is, "do these exercises every day for 3 months and your problem will go away like magic", but I doubt it's that simple.
To try to answer your question about not perceiving it at the time, I think we all often do that when our brain is overloaded (which may be the cause of the error) and also not catching it in real time (again because you're overloaded.) If we have hit our mental computing limit that's it! I really think you are doing the right thing by recording, finding errors in your playing and then practicing those moments/skills when you were overloaded so that they become more automatic and thus not overloading your brain. I think you're doing exactly the right thing.
 

dcrigger

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I don’t think that helps ……
You are depending on that drummer .
It’s a different story when it’s just you and a band ……..
Well YMMV - but I found it helped immensely. In fact, I would tout playing with records (armed with a basic knowledge of technique, rhythm, playing fundamental) as the primary tool I used to become the player I came to be.

Of course, it is a different story with a band - well, of course, it is... the band and I are then "free-wheeling". So I don't think any one would suggest you can learn everything you need to know without ever playing with players... but in my experience, you can learn tons.

One of the best way of learning to play in time - is to actually do it a lot... feel it. Hear it. All while doing everything else required to play music - listen, lock in, interpret, play the part, play dynamics, etc.

For the few thousand hours I spent early on playing with records - there was no need to put me in charge of the time - I didn't yet have the skill set to do all of those other things (listen, play the part, etc) while just playing "in time" with the music. That was ton to work on in itself.

And I could work on all of that vocabulary, and musical and muscle skills for hours and hours a week - just focusing on what I needed to work on - this isn't possible for anyone to do with live players - not for that many hours, and not so selfishly focused on one person's needs.

As far as "depending on that drummer" - sure, probably at first... I mean, there was copping the sense of what he was playing to get down first. But after that it became as much about listening to the bass player, the other players more so than the drummer.

And of course - it is no substitute with the experience that will be eventually needed at "driving the bus" oneself. But that is really just that one skill - holding tempo.... all of the rest of it is very much the same - playing live or with a record.

So for me it was about playing with as many live situations as possible - while filling in the rest of the time (which ended up being the bulk of the time - as a high schooler) doing the next best thing - playing along with recording of the best players (not just drummers) in the world.... increasing my vocabulary, my overall skillset. Which allowed me IMO to jump forward to playing with better and better ensembles - far quicker than my actual live playing experience would've otherwise justified.
 

Rock Salad

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I'll second noodling practice with the metronome. I like the frame of mind of being open to inspiration getting seasoned by strict time from the clicker. I think that this is often where the time gets shakey for me too, when I am ad lib-ing.
I suppose it depends how rote the songs you perform are too. If our songs had strict parts to them, I guess I'd exercise differently

Wait that wasn't the question. How to perceive more critically during performance hmm... Are you sure you actually want that? I suppose you could count though the entire performance, that would probably keep your perception pretty (massively over) focused.
 
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dcrigger

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I found the opposite for myself ,
YMMV - which I can totally dig... but then maybe be careful of stating axioms based on your experience, that are not particularly true... basically contrary to common knowledge.
all you learn from records is how to copy .
Wrong - you can learn form, you can learn styles, you can hear how players deal with ensemble figures and they take any bit of music and experiment playing it utilizing all of the methods you've learned might apply (regardless of what the "other" drumming is doing. In one sense, most everything about building playing vocabulary starts with copying - but it should never stop there. I copy, then I modify, and modify more, then I switch and swap... "how does this idea work on this other record? And by asking "how does this work?" I don't mean take the time to record then play back - I mean, actually listen while I'm playing and decide. Because again - another skill required to play out in the world, being able to self-determine what is working and what isn't. So I'm not talking about making a few such determinations - but hundreds... thousands of the,
And that’s a necessary part of learning to drum , but I think you should be able to play with a metronome all alone and have it sound good . I’ve seen a lot of drummers who taught themselves with records .
Those guys can’t solo can’t improvise and most of them can’t keep time worth a darn .
Maybe those guys couldn't. But I can. Every teacher I've had has acknowledged this as being an essential part of the process - and not just for drums... I know of not jazz soloists that aren't deep into playing records, guitar players, bass players, keyboard players.... and ever drummer I've ever met... that's the literature of our instrument... right there on the records.... we have books of exercises... but not the actual vocabulary of drumming.
Now - if they only played to records... with no foundational training.... well that's an entirely different tale.... The basics of rhythm aren't that complicated - but can be an arduous mystery to unravel without that fundamental work. Same with basic hand technique and coordination... Nobody is learning what they need from playing to records, if using that exercise as a way to teach themself how to count.... why to count... etc. Without that basic stuff in tow, a player is just for so long behind the 8 ball - then yes they are just trying to learn to play by rote... through just pure copying.

So taught themselves with records? Sure.... that's me to a great degree.

Taught themselves with just records? IMO that's a slow boat to likely failure.
You just don’t get a sense of the space between notes jamming to records …
sorry, again maybe for you - but that literally makes no sense to me. Space is space. I've played to pocket records and I've played along with free jazz records. Music is music.... if I hear music and decide to play along... to add my playing to it.... that's what I do. I just recognize the distinction... It's strange that as the world has changed professionally speaking.... nearly all of the playing that I do in the studio (that any drummer these days does in the studio) is any different than playing to records.... nearly all recording drum set these days is overdubbing. Playing with all ready recorded parts - either a demo version - or some version that was a placeholder before the live drums went on. There is very very littler "live tracking" going on - and most of that is with a click - which means the timing is already pretty much pre-defined. So no - music is music and space is space.
I became acutely aware of all this when I discovered I wasn’t really playing right …
Again maybe for you - and without knowing more about whatever problems you were having, I couldn't say why. Other than to (as I've done) point out that the conclusions you've drawn from that experience differs considerable from the common knowledge.

But again - as with everything - Your Milage May Indeed Vary.
 

Houndog

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Well David , My mileage certainly does apparently vary …..

I’m starting to become painfully aware of my lack of skill on drums …I have virtually no independence, there are things I’ve worked on for years that I just can’t get .
Some things when I finally figure them out , it’s like geez that’s all that was ?
 


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