How Do I Get Rid of a Brilliant Finish?

marko52

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I've got a great old Sabian crash that, unfortunately, has a brilliant finish. Has anybody gotten rid of a brilliant finish with, maybe, vinegar or something similar? Don't really like the shiny. thanks.......marko
 

marko52

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You're a killer, Joe.
Half of the cymbal looks fine, where it's been handled a lot. But the rest still has the bright finish. It seems like it'd tarnish over time but it's pretty slow. There's not a clear finish on early Sabians, is there?.......marko
 
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zenstat

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I don't think they have any clear coat. But something like acetone would remove anything which was there.

You could probably "tone down" look of the brilliant finish by doing a patina treatment. The usual sort of salt water with a little vinegar, applied repeatedly and allowing it to dry in between coats. Let me know if you want a specific recipe with proportions.
 

RyanR

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My understanding is that it's a high pressure buff.... enough that it knocks off the ridges left behind from lathing.

Really no way to truly un-brilliant a cymbal.

-Ryan
 

mbettis

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Remove the rod from your hi-hat stand. Chuck the rod up in a variable speed electric drill. Mount the cymbal on the rod with your hi-hat clutch.

Stabilize the free end of the rod in something like a thick piece of cardboard.

Spin the cymbal with the drill and then apply some medium-grit abrasive. Sanding sponges work great, because they get down into hammer marks and tonal grooves.

It's quick and easy.

Later,
Matt
 

barryabko

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RyanR said:
My understanding is that it's a high pressure buff.... enough that it knocks off the ridges left behind from lathing -Ryan
I believe that Ryan is correct but removing any clear coat with some type of stripper may make it look less shiny as will natural oxidation over time. I would avoid using additional abrasives as that will alter the sound quality to a greater degree. Just my two cents.
 

marko52

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Thanks, guys, for the responses. I think i'm gonna go with Matt's suggestion--I'm sure he knows what he's talkin' about, & i like the quick solution. I'll report back if I don't injure myself too badly.........marko
 

zenstat

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marko52 said:
Thanks, guys, for the responses. I think i'm gonna go with Matt's suggestion--I'm sure he knows what he's talkin' about, & i like the quick solution. I'll report back if I don't injure myself too badly.........marko
Before and after pics please? I'm interested to see how it goes.
 

rikkrebs

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zenstat said:
Thanks, guys, for the responses. I think i'm gonna go with Matt's suggestion--I'm sure he knows what he's talkin' about, & i like the quick solution. I'll report back if I don't injure myself too badly.........marko
Before and after pics please? I'm interested to see how it goes.
Yes please. Before and after pics. This is something I would like to try.
 

michaelg

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Thanks, guys, for the responses. I think i'm gonna go with Matt's suggestion--I'm sure he knows what he's talkin' about, & i like the quick solution. I'll report back if I don't injure myself too badly.........marko
Bumpa,, Marko did you end up trying Matt's suggestion ? how'd it go ?
 

lrod1707

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Would be cool to know considering the thread is 5 years old. Wonder how they would look after removing a bright finish.
 

premierplayer

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Remove the rod from your hi-hat stand. Chuck the rod up in a variable speed electric drill. Mount the cymbal on the rod with your hi-hat clutch.

Stabilize the free end of the rod in something like a thick piece of cardboard.

Spin the cymbal with the drill and then apply some medium-grit abrasive. Sanding sponges work great, because they get down into hammer marks and tonal grooves.

It's quick and easy.

Later,
Matt
I remember Matt's first HiHat rod and drill rig posted on CH, even had pictures :icon_e_biggrin:.

Back to OP's ? My first thought was glass beads at 90 psi.
 

Bri6366

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I acquired an older Zildjian brilliant finished cymbal that was pretty cruddy and the seller didn't realize it was brilliant. It was advertised as having a 60s Doors album sound. It took Zildjian polish and plenty of elbow grease to bring the finish back. I would simply not clean the cymbal and let nature take its course.
 

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Having lathed and sanded and shined dozens of cymbals on my trusty 1/2" drill over the years, Matt is correct. You can use dish washing abrasive or non-abrasive pads. You can use various grits of steel wool. Anything with a slightly rough finish will do the trick. Spin the cymbal (I use a 1/2" threaded rod and a couple nuts to hold the cymbal down. I place the drill between the jaws of a standard vice to hold it steady. And the vice is table mounted. Squeeze the trigger gently for the right speed, start at the bell and move your way down. Works great. It will easily take the brilliant shine off. It will also clean up the grungiest of cymbals with some Bar Keeper's Friend or other scouring powder and a little water or ammonia, or windex, whatever, as well as the abrasive creams used to clean glass stove tops; for those who are into clean/new looking cymbals. Acetone removes the lacquer nicely. I hate logos so, those go first and if you like logos, this method is not for you using abrasives. It is amazing just how tough some of those logos out there are.
 

lrod1707

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Why not just sell it and buy something you actually want?
Some people like the particular sound of a cymbal but not the shiny look. Seems like that was the issue with the OP. Question is, What's happened since then since the thread is like 5 years old.
 

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