How Do I Get Rid of a Brilliant Finish?

lrod1707

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Yes, please do show & tell! I could be convinced to do the same thing.
Definitely not for me! I like my clean shiny cymbals as they were made. I really do want to see them though out of curiosity. Who knows, might change my mind!
 

michaelg

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What would be the likely changes sound-wise in doing this ?

Meinl go the other way and polish some of their raw finish cymbals to be have a somewhat brilliant finish, like the transition ride.
 

michaelg

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And in reverse going from raw to polished,,,

So i have this Bosphorus turk 20" ride cymbal for years that is really nice but always felt it too dry, i even toyed with the idea of having a cymbal-smith lathe one side but figured it would be cost too much with shipping etc

I tried Matts suggestion with the cymbal in drill and applying a sanding sponge to the underside of the cymbal working from the bell outwards.
Lots of dark brown crud/oxidation came off but it still looks like a turk finish, albeit a bit more shiny.

End result is a definite improvement to my ears, still dry but with some nice airy wash now and touch of sparkle to the sound. Its like the cymbal has woken up.
 

tkillian

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Remove the rod from your hi-hat stand. Chuck the rod up in a variable speed electric drill. Mount the cymbal on the rod with your hi-hat clutch.

Stabilize the free end of the rod in something like a thick piece of cardboard.

Spin the cymbal with the drill and then apply some medium-grit abrasive. Sanding sponges work great, because they get down into hammer marks and tonal grooves.

It's quick and easy.

Later,
Matt
Ive always wonder if I took the coating off a paiste traditional...would the stick sound be more.."zildjiany"? Ha.
No. Seriously.

That coating is not a brilliant







finish...but there is definitely a coating on the trads
 

michaelg

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It would certainly develop patina a lot quicker,, Trads the same alloy as the signatures ?
 
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michaelg

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REF

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I have taken off the Paiste coating on a Signature. I have it set up right now. I did it a year ago. Still looks brand new. The coating really takes on stick scuffs that can't be removed after awhile just using windex-type cleaners, which is what I normally use just to brief clean them. I got the Sig off ebay and it was pretty messed up. Not now.
 

michaelg

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I have taken off the Paiste coating on a Signature. I have it set up right now. I did it a year ago. Still looks brand new. The coating really takes on stick scuffs that can't be removed after awhile just using windex-type cleaners, which is what I normally use just to brief clean them. I got the Sig off ebay and it was pretty messed up. Not now.
Cool,,, does it look and/or sound different at all with it removed ?
 

falconium

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I've got a great old Sabian crash that, unfortunately, has a brilliant finish. Has anybody gotten rid of a brilliant finish with, maybe, vinegar or something similar? Don't really like the shiny. thanks.......marko
I got this: go to the beauty section of your local Walgreen's or CVS. Get a small jar of "Sulfa 8", which is a sulphur and petroleum jelly hair ointment. Strip the clear coat off the cymbal (paint thinner, let it soak and you can wipe it off, maybe use fine steel wool round and round in the grooves, not across. Once the clear coat is off, smear the sulfa 8 on the exposed bronze and in about 20 minutes it will look like its from Instanbul circa 1800. I did this ride cymbal 5 or 6 years ago and i am just getting a few bright spots. I need to find the Sulfa 8 and touch up, but its a chemical reaction so its permanent and non-smearing. Sulfa 8 is the same thing as "Liver of Sulphur" which is mentioned in various metallurgy books for creating a patina on bronze and copper. It will cost you about $5
and you'll have something that looks like this (formerly a bright and shiny $100 Meinl):::
(if there is any difference in sound, it sounds warmer, a little less bright, which I prefer.
The only reason the clear coat is on there is so new inventory stays looking new in the stores.)

IMG_6309.JPG
 

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