How Do You Paint Your Drums?

Bojangles1594

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Hey Guys!

I'm currently looking to buy a paint gun and compressor to start spraying dyes and stains.
This got me wondering, what do you guys use to paint your drums?
If not paint, do y'all have setups for applying wraps, glitters or any other finishes?

Would love to see what y'all got!
 

JazzDrumGuy

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By hand. Brush or foam brush for paint. Rag for stain. Rag or brush for poly. Looking forward to other replies........
 

pgm554

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Hey Guys!

I'm currently looking to buy a paint gun and compressor to start spraying dyes and stains.
This got me wondering, what do you guys use to paint your drums?
If not paint, do y'all have setups for applying wraps, glitters or any other finishes?

Would love to see what y'all got!
If you live in CA ,be prepared for a lot of red tape when it comes to buying paint and finishing products.
 

cruddola

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Made a 'Lazy Susan' table and was able get away nicely coating a British-made coffin-lugged Yamaha beater kit with eight rattle-cans of ACE Satin Polyurethane. I have no experience applying mid to heavy glitter. (I like using dyes in Poly. I like water-based stains on bare wood with a poly overcoat. Just my preference and that of my harp-maker dad.) The previous owner or owners stripped the wrap leaving the unfinished wood, then painted a dark flat red over the raised grain. Lousy job, but at 200 bucks for a 10,12,14,16 and 22 Luan kit, not bad after everything. British Yamaha's version of the first Imperialstars, I guess. They're my truck drums. But, that ain't what you wanna do with what you have in mind. But set up a 'Lazy Susan' that will allow you to keep the same paint-gun distance of the drum with your finish and let the rotation do any movement to get that EVEN-laid finish. Figure inches per second as the drum rotates. Several light coats are better than a heavy coat. TAKE YOUR TIME. Every drum gets the same inches per second. Should not have to move your gun side to side as the drum rotates while it's on it's edge. Only up and down. Mask the bearing edges. Take your time and practice on cheap Home Depot Buckets covered with butcher paper. To do my bass drum I found a bicycle wheel and placed it inside the drum, and inflated to size using pieces of packing foam for the extra diameter the tire didn't cover. I ran a rod and mounted the rod ends to wood blocks. This enabled me to turn the drum horizontally to get the best even coating on the bass drum. When you get to where you can lay an even coat of water without tears you'll be there and can then practice the same with your chosen finish on the real drum. Make sure you have enough finish to do all the drums. I've had two purchases of the exact same finishes with differences in consistency after drying. If you've got choice drums think about having a competent luthier (wooden instrument-maker) do the job. Remember you get to do it once. Good luck.
 
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kallen49

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ok you asked...I used artist oil paint directly on 4 drums. They were not wrapped but all had a factory finish, not high gloss, (Yamaha, Taye, Ludwig) except for the 20" club date bass drum which I sanded because the original finish had almost entirely peeled off.
The paint stuck to them.
Depending on how thick, oil paint dries to the touch in a few weeks but takes years to fully cure. After a few months I coated them with a clear spray (varnish) meant for artist oils.
I had this idea before Jenkins Martin made their amazing "Starry Night" kits, (not sure how they achieved their finish).
 

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Deafmoon

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Behlens stain. 2 coats foam brushes applied to a clean shell. Gloss finish or satin finish foam brush applied Tung oil ( no fish eye with tung oil) 10 coats. Graduated grade paper Wet sanding in between every coat. I generally start at 180, 320, 400 (2 coats),600 (2 coats), 1000, 1200, 1500, 2000. You can get this paper at Auto Parts Stores. Bowling alley wax applied and the. buffed with a soft cotton wheel.
 

Bojangles1594

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I use an Apollo HVLP spray system and my wife’s pottery wheel. This has worked well on several shells.
Nice! Beautiful work! I’ve been wanting to set up a turntable to do painting and maybe sanding. Still toying around with ideas, because I’d like to rotate the drum around a horizontal axis but idk.
 
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Bojangles1594

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Behlens stain. 2 coats foam brushes applied to a clean shell. Gloss finish or satin finish foam brush applied Tung oil ( no fish eye with tung oil) 10 coats. Graduated grade paper Wet sanding in between every coat. I generally start at 180, 320, 400 (2 coats),600 (2 coats), 1000, 1200, 1500, 2000. You can get this paper at Auto Parts Stores. Bowling alley wax applied and the. buffed with a soft cotton wheel.
I bet they come out looking nice and shiny! I need to learn more about sanding between coats and increasing grit at the same time.

I recently just did 320 to remove finish, then 400 in between coats of stain. I was just following advice. I was scared of sanding through the veneer and didn’t wanna sand too fine on birch either.

How do you determine what grit to start on and what grit to sand to? How do you decide when to move up a grit after applying a layer?
 

Mendozart

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I had this idea before Jenkins Martin made their amazing "Starry Night" kits, (not sure how they achieved their finish).
The J-M finish is achieved by printing the image on a special fabric. The shell is then spun half way, the fabric is then applied, and then spun over the fabric. Therefore it is embedded in the shell.
 

Houndog

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Made a 'Lazy Susan' table and was able get away nicely coating a British-made coffin-lugged Yamaha beater kit with eight rattle-cans of ACE Satin Polyurethane. I have no experience applying mid to heavy glitter. (I like using dyes in Poly. I like water-based stains on bare wood with a poly overcoat. Just my preference and that of my harp-maker dad.) The previous owner or owners stripped the wrap leaving the unfinished wood, then painted a dark flat red over the raised grain. Lousy job, but at 200 bucks for a 10,12,14,16 and 22 Luan kit, not bad after everything. British Yamaha's version of the first Imperialstars, I guess. They're my truck drums. But, that ain't what you wanna do with what you have in mind. But set up a 'Lazy Susan' that will allow you to keep the same paint-gun distance of the drum with your finish and let the rotation do any movement to get that EVEN-laid finish. Figure inches per second as the drum rotates. Several light coats are better than a heavy coat. TAKE YOUR TIME. Every drum gets the same inches per second. Should not have to move your gun side to side as the drum rotates while it's on it's edge. Only up and down. Mask the bearing edges. Take your time and practice on cheap Home Depot Buckets covered with butcher paper. To do my bass drum I found a bicycle wheel and placed it inside the drum, and inflated to size using pieces of packing foam for the extra diameter the tire didn't cover. I ran a rod and mounted the rod ends to wood blocks. This enabled me to turn the drum horizontally to get the best even coating on the bass drum. When you get to where you can lay an even coat of water without tears you'll be there and can then practice the same with your chosen finish on the real drum. Make sure you have enough finish to do all the drums. I've had two purchases of the exact same finishes with differences in consistency after drying. If you've got choice drums think about having a competent luthier (wooden instrument-maker) do the job. Remember you get to do it once. Good luck.
I wish you’d learn how to make paragraphs etc …It’s not easy reading your posts .
Not trying to be that guy , but this is reading based communication.
 

franke

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Hey Guys!

I'm currently looking to buy a paint gun and compressor to start spraying dyes and stains.
This got me wondering, what do you guys use to paint your drums?
If not paint, do y'all have setups for applying wraps, glitters or any other finishes?

Would love to see what y'all got!

I have only done stains and with clear lacquer. Solid colors require a lot of prep work (sanding, filling, primer, etc.,) and are difficult to do without a spray rig and the means to evenly sand to a smooth finish. If you do end up buying one, I suggest you get a HVLP system since it will work best for this application.

California (as well as some other states) do not allow the sale of oil-based lacquers in liquid form (but I believe you can still get it in a rattle can), so if there are restrictions where you live, you may have to use a water or acrylic-based paint. This in itself is not a bad thing, considering that the auto industry currently uses the same stuff.

One can make a wrapping machine from repurposed parts (for example, an old ringer washer), but unless one intends to wrap a lot of drums, the work required to make one - or the cost to buy a ready-made example (usually around a $1,000) - seems impractical. Finally, many of the sparkle/glitter finishes that one sees on mid-range kits is actually an acrylic polymer - which can be bought at any auto paint store - but I do not know the PSI requirements to shoot it are. Good luck with your project.
 

Bojangles1594

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I have only done stains and with clear lacquer. Solid colors require a lot of prep work (sanding, filling, primer, etc.,) and are difficult to do without a spray rig and the means to evenly sand to a smooth finish. If you do end up buying one, I suggest you get a HVLP system since it will work best for this application.

California (as well as some other states) do not allow the sale of oil-based lacquers in liquid form (but I believe you can still get it in a rattle can), so if there are restrictions where you live, you may have to use a water or acrylic-based paint. This in itself is not a bad thing, considering that the auto industry currently uses the same stuff.

One can make a wrapping machine from repurposed parts (for example, an old ringer washer), but unless one intends to wrap a lot of drums, the work required to make one - or the cost to buy a ready-made example (usually around a $1,000) - seems impractical. Finally, many of the sparkle/glitter finishes that one sees on mid-range kits is actually an acrylic polymer - which can be bought at any auto paint store - but I do not know the PSI requirements to shoot it are. Good luck with your project.
Thanks!
How do you normally do a stain?
Do you use the same process for every project, or does it depend on the drum?
 

franke

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Thanks!
How do you normally do a stain?
Do you use the same process for every project, or does it depend on the drum?

Stain is usually applied with a rag (wipe on). Allow to soak in for a few minutes, then wipe off excess. Aniline dyes (which are alcohol-based) are sometimes applied with a brush or a quick wipe since they dry almost instantly. Since what I am describing is wood finishing, then the process would be the same each time, regardless of whether the drum is a tom, bass or snare. Only differences would pertain to color effects (like blending two stains to get a unique shade) or if the clear coat is gloss or satin.
 


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