How far are your hats from your snare?

Squirrel Man

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My snare is up about an inch or so over my thighs and that's my comfort point. I have long legs and they get in the way a bit. I measured my hats and they're exactly 6 inches up from the snare and I notice that when I'm speeding stuff and bouncing off the hats and transitioning and the like I sometimes get tangled up or get stick hits. I really don't want to raise my hats any and it's something that I just need to work around and I will but I've been paying attention to videos out of curiosity and it's tough to judge. I'm wondering if anyone's paid attention to this any.

Thanks!
 

Lee Van Kief

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I fret about it all the time, but honestly don’t experiment as much as I should. Mine are currently 5” up from the snare. Any more and I feel like I’d have to raise my arm and shoulder to play on top of the hats.

I have long arms compared to my torso and generally don’t play all too many transitional hi-hat to snare patterns using both arms. No problems with sticks running into each other.
 

Hop

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My hats are just off to the left and about 2" above the snare rim... but I switched to open-handed when I started playing again.
Try open-handed yourself and you won't get crossed-up and will be able to drop the height of the hats as well.
 
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Whitten

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My hats are as far as I can handle from my snare. This is all about sound in a microphone situation. The worst thing for snare drum (live or studio) is hi-hat in the snare mic.
 

hsosdrum

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I play double-bass, which forces my hi-hat pedal farther away from the snare. At the closest point the edges of the cymbals are about 7 inches from the snare rim and about 5 inches above it. My snare rim is about 2 inches above my thighs, which is my comfort zone.

I don't play my hats double-handed (I have a 17" china cymbal that overlaps the left edge of my hats), but I do sometimes hit my sticks together when I'm playing the hats with my right hand (at 68 years old there's no way I'm trudging up that steep open-handed learning curve). I tried raising my hats but that didn't solve the problem. Not sure what else I can do at this point except keep practicing. (I didn't have this stick-hitting problem when I was younger — getting old sucks!)
 

pjmariner

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I played around with this recently, had hats further away at regular level which is about 6"above snare, or at about 8" above snare where they slightly overlap snare.

I am now setled at 6" above snare with hats just over left edge of snare. I have an old tama lever glide hi-hat stand, one of the legs is adjustable, so I can lean hats towards me and keep pedal at a comfortable distance.

I liked the higher hats, and further away hats for preventing stick tangle by having stuff to tight, but after sooooo many years of beating up my shoulders in the gym, i don't like keep them up or rotated for any amount of time. With hats at 8 inches I had to rotate shoulder to play on top of hats, and playing 16ths one handed was miserable. Same thing with pushing stand to far away, I had to reach for hats, which gets tiring. Current setup I can play 16ths all day long with shoulders relaxed, and just using fingers and rebound for the most part. Same thing with snare, I have it about thigh level, and my hand can just rest on my thigh so i can play ghost notes with finger/wrist without having to support my arm. Makes all the difference, now my left arm can rest for everything but fills and back beat, and my right arm can play hats and ride without any funky shoulder rotation. Down side is kit is overall tighter, so I do need to be more accurate, but since 90% of the time i am playing hats/ride, snare and bass drum, that's where focus is.
 

jaymandude

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you gotta ask where people like to play their hats tho. On top or on the edge...
 
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pjmariner

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you gotta ask where people like to play their hats tho. On top or on the edge...
Very true, if you only play hats on edge, you can put the hats pretty flippin high before it becomes any kind of issue. I play both. Any height lower than 6 inches above snare and playing on edge is difficult for me, other wise if I only played on top I suppose I could go down another inch at least.
 

moonbabie

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Roughly 13”....thats 27” from the floor to top of snare and 40” to center of hats from the floor.
 
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Dumpy

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The edge of my hats would touch the snare if they were on the same plane. My hats are maybe 6” above the snare.
 
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JDA

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you gotta ask where people like to play their hats tho. On top or on the edge...
right to me ... is just another surface; no interest in mic problems associated
or playing on edge not interested.....to me just another surface target to me
 

bonefamily

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I like my hi hats as low as I can without interfering with my snare hand - not overlapping the snare, but right next to it. I never measured but I would say about 4” above snare height. I play trad grip and I play on the tops of the hats.
 


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