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How many “princess and the pea” details on drums people willing to quibble over?

JDA

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The story tells of a prince who wants to marry a princess but is having difficulty finding a suitable wife. Something is always wrong with those he meets and he cannot be certain they are real princesses because they have bad table manners or they are not his type. One stormy night, a young woman drenched with rain seeks shelter in the prince's castle. She claims to be a princess, but no one is really believing her because of the way she looks, so the prince's mother decides to test their unexpected guest by placing a pea in the bed she is offered for the night, covered by 20 mattresses and laid them upon the pea and placed twenty eider-down beds on top of the mattresses.

In the morning, the princess tells her hosts that she endured a sleepless night, kept awake by something hard in the bed that she is certain has bruised her. With the proof of her bruised back, the princess passes the test and the prince rejoices happily, for only a real princess would have the sensitivity to feel a pea through such a quantity of bedding. The two are happily married, and the story ends with the pea being placed in a museum, where, according to the story, it can still be seen today unless someone has stolen it.
 

JDA

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If at least One Thing can be perfect in One's Life; geeze; make it your drum set and symbols;
It's not that difficult ... (I suggest new (toms, bass, holders) drums/ with vintage snares- that way you have both/old and new) nor is it as expensive as boats, planes and cars.
 
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Tama CW

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I’m not one to quibble. I removed the gaskets on my Ludwig classic maple kit because it looked better without them and they still sounded ok.

And if you ever plan to sell....you will likely provide the next owner with those gaskets. In which case.....you never "effectively" quibbled.
But.........if you already tossed out those gaskets....then you get 10 bonus "non-quibble" points.....and our admiration for sticking to your guns .
 

ARGuy

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How many "Princess and the Pea" details will we quibble about? Probably about as many as we'll get of the clichéd and meaningless "imagine if you put that time and effort into practicing" or "the audience won't hear the difference" or "(Insert drummer's name) didn't need (Insert product name)" statements.
 

JimmyM

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The audience doesn’t even enter into the equation for me when I’m deciding about what I like and/or quibble over. I have to like what I’m hearing, and I want to be confident in my gear and comfy with my surroundings. So if you can’t tell what heads I’m using, I don’t care…I can, and that’s all that matters.
 

pwc1141

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Heck, I only worry whether any gear I have is going to get used on a gig sometime soon .....and if I have a shirt that goes with potential decor of the potential venue :)
 

hsosdrum

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I admit I am one of those "quibblers." But, only in regards to figuring out what to pay for an item or how much to sell it for. There HAS to be a price differential
for collectible or semi-collectible items not having all their original features and/or parts. And just because you might not care about it for the decades you own an item,
it will matter come sale time. Some of us like to bring back a drum to OEM authenticity....without breaking the bank. I'll do that and sell off the incorrect parts. I've done a number
tension rod swaps on vintage drums......gone out and found the correct snare wires.....dutifully replace the proper 1" fibered packing tape on all my 1980's Tama snares. That's how they came.
Your keystone '64 Supra doesn't have to have orig heads, snare wires, cob hoops, red felt muffler, and correct tension rods with brass washers. But one with all those bells and whistles is worth $100-$250
more than one that doesn't have them.....even if they sound identical. Hey, don't worry about this during your ownership. It doesn't come into play.....yet.

I've butted heads with MOST of the Old K guys on their FB forum when it came to edge dents/dings, flea bites, key holes, bell hole cracks, and other "small" flaws. The majority of them say none of that
stuff matters, these are old cymbals, it's just expected typical wear and tear. I bet that works good when they sell....lol. But then flip it around when they're buying....look no flaws. Sure they're small flaws. And for sure they devalue the cymbal somewhat when you're talking $600-$3000 for clean examples. That "inconsequential" bell hole crack might be a $200 item on a $2000 old K. A seasoned buyer typically won't
let it go by.....unless they miss it. And this still applies to $200 old A's too. Might devalue the cymbal to $175. I get that it still plays the same despite small flaws. But there has to be a price
difference from a totally clean one. Pricing on drum gear is not a step function........it's a continuous function. If you're a long time owner who is going to pass along your gear to someone in the
family or donate it.....then none of this matters.
But you're talking about participating in commerce, not making art. As a drummer (I don't think I can say "as an artist" without sounding like a twit) the things about my instruments that matter to me are: 1) sound, 2) playability, 3) functionality, 4) looks. Whenever I've bought a piece of gear I have never (and I mean NEVER) given a single thought to what it might be worth if and when I sell it. Not. One. Thought. It's all about sound, playability, functionality and looks — period. If something has no effect on any of those four qualities I don't give it a thought. If it does have an effect on one (or more) of those qualities it matters. How much it matters is where the quibbling resides.*

*Primary example of potential quibbling: Ludwig's black plastic lug gaskets. They do affect looks so I did think about them before I bought my Legacy Maples (in WMP, so the gaskets are definitely noticeable). My feelings about them: I actually think they slightly improve the way the drums look. And from a functionality standpoint I sure as hell wouldn't want to remove the gaskets and have the tension rods splayed outwards, making tuning more difficult.
 
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Swissward Flamtacles

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what is princess and the pea
Geez, do we have to explain everything?
The question is this: If a pea falls onto a bass drum filled with 20 feather beds, but nobody hears it, is this feathering taken too far?

I try not to care too much about minutiae and sometimes wonder if some drummers drank the silver sealer, but then again, there are pros that really care about all the details, especially in the studio. Each to their own.
 

xtranoise

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But, the real test is, do your rabbit holes have to be in round?
OK @Matched Gripper, you got me to thinking, so I took some digital calipers and measured a common rabbit hole and it indeed WAS out of round. This explains why the resonance of my inane babbling sounded so off as I descended into the hole. Then it dawned on me, was I using twisted nylon rope or polyester tow strap material as my safety line while descending. Surely this will have an affect on the resonance as well!?! And was said safety line resting on the edge of the rabbit hole or did I have it running over a log or rock? Wait! How might the log or rock affect the durability of my safety line that is already interfering with the resonance of the out of round hole. This is getting complicated!!!

Now why was I going down this hole again????
 

Drdrumdude3009

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Functionality is key. It’s different making certain all details are attended in order to make certain drums don’t fail mid-gig. Those details are important. I always took care of things like fresh cymbal stand items because keyholes are largely preventable. I always have spare items.
 

Drdrumdude3009

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OK @Matched Gripper, you got me to thinking, so I took some digital calipers and measured a common rabbit hole and it indeed WAS out of round. This explains why the resonance of my inane babbling sounded so off as I descended into the hole. Then it dawned on me, was I using twisted nylon rope or polyester tow strap material as my safety line while descending. Surely this will have an affect on the resonance as well!?! And was said safety line resting on the edge of the rabbit hole or did I have it running over a log or rock? Wait! How might the log or rock affect the durability of my safety line that is already interfering with the resonance of the out of round hole. This is getting complicated!!!

Now why was I going down this hole again????

Always remember that mole holes are barely subterranean and rabbit holes are deep!
 

K.O.

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I admit I am one of those "quibblers." But, only in regards to figuring out what to pay for an item or how much to sell it for. There HAS to be a price differential
for collectible or semi-collectible items not having all their original features and/or parts. And just because you might not care about it for the decades you own an item,
it will matter come sale time. Some of us like to bring back a drum to OEM authenticity....without breaking the bank. I'll do that and sell off the incorrect parts. I've done a number
tension rod swaps on vintage drums......gone out and found the correct snare wires.....dutifully replace the proper 1" fibered packing tape on all my 1980's Tama snares. That's how they came.
Your keystone '64 Supra doesn't have to have orig heads, snare wires, cob hoops, red felt muffler, and correct tension rods with brass washers. But one with all those bells and whistles is worth $100-$250
more than one that doesn't have them.....even if they sound identical. Hey, don't worry about this during your ownership. It doesn't come into play.....yet.

I've butted heads with MOST of the Old K guys on their FB forum when it came to edge dents/dings, flea bites, key holes, bell hole cracks, and other "small" flaws. The majority of them say none of that
stuff matters, these are old cymbals, it's just expected typical wear and tear. I bet that works good when they sell....lol. But then flip it around when they're buying....look no flaws. Sure they're small flaws. And for sure they devalue the cymbal somewhat when you're talking $600-$3000 for clean examples. That "inconsequential" bell hole crack might be a $200 item on a $2000 old K. A seasoned buyer typically won't
let it go by.....unless they miss it. And this still applies to $200 old A's too. Might devalue the cymbal to $175. I get that it still plays the same despite small flaws. But there has to be a price
difference from a totally clean one. Pricing on drum gear is not a step function........it's a continuous function. If you're a long time owner who is going to pass along your gear to someone in the
family or donate it.....then none of this matters.
Certainly originality does matter in terms of value. A 100% original as built drum will be worth more than one with some (or lots of) replacement parts.

I guess it depends on whether this is chiefly a discussion of functionality, where equivalent replacement parts seldom matter, or collectibility, where they can matter a great deal.
 

Drdrumdude3009

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Certainly originality does matter in terms of value. A 100% original as built drum will be worth more than one with some (or lots of) replacement parts.

I guess it depends on whether this is chiefly a discussion of functionality, where equivalent replacement parts seldom matter, or collectibility, where they can matter a great deal.

I used to sling used/vintage guitars around. I get original versus modified. More often than not, I would reach into the Rubbermaid tub and see what I could grab to make a Les Paul original. I had boxes of DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. I have a few boxes of Sperzel and other aftermarket tuners. The funniest thing is that the old aftermarket parts are becoming desirable for guitars!

I understand fully where originality will increase value. I am going to always judge what I am willing to pay and adjust my expectations of sales price due to originality of instruments.
 


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