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How to behave like a pro ?

Ludwig26

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Educational, helpful, informative advice!!!!!! :),
Being a "pro" SHOULD you have to put up with arrogant, moody,"touchy" (NOT "touchy/feely but "touchy" emotionally)?.
I just lost a tribute band gig because i called the singer moody&touchy because,
I dared to suggest we can all learn&practice a certain song if we take the effort, energy,learn it, practice it.
I was also asking about her inspirations ,
She then proceeded to question my " professionalisim",
& Said my 'services are no longer required",
& Thanked me for auditioning&learning the songs,
She then removed me from the group's FB page,
Her partner (guitarist) also reiterated her comments.....,
I've since moved on.
 

DrumPhil

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Educational, helpful, informative advice!!!!!! :),
Being a "pro" SHOULD you have to put up with arrogant, moody,"touchy" (NOT "touchy/feely but "touchy" emotionally)?.
I just lost a tribute band gig because i called the singer moody&touchy because,
I dared to suggest we can all learn&practice a certain song if we take the effort, energy,learn it, practice it.
I was also asking about her inspirations ,
She then proceeded to question my " professionalisim",
& Said my 'services are no longer required",
& Thanked me for auditioning&learning the songs,
She then removed me from the group's FB page,
Her partner (guitarist) also reiterated her comments.....,
I've since moved on.

You are probably better off leaving a band like that. Long ago I got kicked out of a band because I knew what a triplet was. They said that if you know too much about music you lose your "street edge". Can't say I really miss playing with those guys--the attitude was too much.
 

doubleroll

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Whatever you do…Don’t act like this “Pro” OUCH!

 

moondrum

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Get to the gig/session early.
Be prepared.
Be courteous & friendly.
Don't bad mouth or bitch about other musicians .

Any more tips ?
If the manger or someone else ( lead singer) says the band is too loud don’t complain just turn it down.

If the venue decides not to feed the band don’t complain about it but it’s good to find out beforehand if the band is getting fed.

Bring your business cards if someone likes your playing and wants you contact info.

Also if you’re not playing in a Grateful Dead type jam band find out what the dress code is,nice shirt and pants? Jacket and tie? I always mention to my band when I booked a gig in a nice venue, no T shirts, sneakers, ripped jeans, etc.
As one of my favorite drummers Art Blakey once said….”The audience SEES you before they hear you!”
In other words you want to look professional besides sounding professional.
A drummer friend of mine told me how he and a trio were setting up in a club to play. They were all wearing t shirts, old jeans and shorts.
When they finished setting up the club owner asked them if they’re going to change into better clothes. When the band replied they’re playing in their shorts ,t shirts ,and sneakers, the club owner fired them and sent them home. The audience in this club always came dressed nice for a night out and the club owner didn’t want a band that looked like bums.
 

langmick

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Take into account if the lead singer is the ALPHA and watch what you say.

There can be only one ALPHA and if you cross them, be prepared for what comes next, passive-aggressive comments onstage and off, fisticuffs maybe, other stuff that may involve a payout. Granted, if they booked the gig and their name is on the marquee, they have a right to control things. That can go beyond what is appropriate. In these cases, just moving forward is about all you can do. They make look for a fight tho.

No matter how progressive some may say they are, they still are human beings and can be extremely awful and cruel. In my experience the more the person publicly displays their progressiveness and caring and how great they are, they care about the planet etc, the more they are unmoored from mores and being a good person. Watch that type. They will stab you in the back and can be very political if you're not part of the Borg Collective.

Most of being a pro is dealing with people, not the music, which is odd, but reality.
 
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GiveMeYourSmallestSticks!

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I should have added “while performing”. Move forward, the past is dome.
I'm no pro, but my band was recently chatting and someone mentioned something about me never making mistakes. I had to laugh, and responded that I make them all the time, but do my best to hide them and/or integrate them into my playing.

To paraphrase a smart artist somewhere, "Honour your accidents as though they were intentional".
 

bpaluzzi

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In my experience the more the person publicly displays their progressiveness and caring and how great they are, they care about the planet etc, the more they are unmoored from mores and being a good person. Watch that type. They will stab you in the back and can be very political if you're not part of the Borg Collective.

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

hawker

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Once per decade I end up playing with some guys and one of them ends up drinking too much. So carefully monitor your own drinking. Better yet, don't begin. If there is that "one guy"....don't put up with it for long before the band leader speaks to him or her about it. The longer you let it go the harder the confrontation becomes.

PS: I should have said; "the longer you let it go, the greater the chance that conversation...becomes a confrontation".
 
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RIDDIM

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Always be early. To be on time is to be late.

Use a checklist to verify you load everything you need before leaving home - especially if there's a change of clothes involved. There's nothing like that feeling of arriving at a gig early only to realize a key item is back in the garage. Not one of life's greater joys.

If you've been given music to learn, know it backwards and forwards. If you're reading, make sure you have a reliable stand. If you're reading paper charts, bring a stand light or 2. If you're using an iPad, charge it before the gig.

Carry spares of high use/failure items. I generally carry a spare snare, pedal and heads - especially if it's like to get rambunctious. This has saved my bacon a few times.

You don't need to brown nose, but be easy to work with and nice to be around. Don't engage in gratuitously confrontational behavior. Don't be a problem. Be an asset.

Play what the music and the situation need, no more and no less, at the right dynamic level (first sets are often at a lower dynamic than third ones). Make the leader/front people happy you're there.

I hope this helps.
 

Thebstar

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Be early

Be sober

Be prepared musically

Have everything you need ready to set up

Have extra snare and bass drum batter heads in their cases

Listen with your ears open and mouth closed

If your name isn’t on the ticket, don’t try to be the star

Nobody likes arrogance or “that guy” so don’t be “that guy”

If you’re the best musician or most experienced in the band, kindly help your mates and be there for them. Chances are they’re nervous enough. Praise for the good, no matter how little, is better than embarrassing them and you.

We are in charge of tempo, groove and the feel of the song. Smile, enjoy yourself and never let them see you sweat.
 

Skinsmannn

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1) Know your parts if you are covering.
2) NO STAGE DIARRHEA ....YOU OR ANYONE.....NONE.
3) Be immersed 100%
4) tear down as fast as possible.
5) and NEVER stop a song short. If someone else goofs up ...plow thru it.
 

JazzyJeff

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Obviously great answers. Here are a couple outliers that I consider:
1- if you want to play a new tune, present it knowing full well that one ‘nay’ will nix it. Be okay with that.
2- If you can, carry consumables for other instruments - I have saved the day a number of times with batteries, extension cords, instrument cables, ground lifts, etc.
3- know where the local music store is in case you need to get something quick that has been forgotten/ was broken at the gig
4- if possible stay and help once the gig is over. Usually we’re last ones out, but in the occasion where the guitar player brings the PA, stay and help.

Lastly, if you’re in the support band and your band leader wants a drum solo in your set. Politely push back as that is tacky as hell.
 

MrDrums2112

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Same. If it's outside and 110+ I understand if the other guys in my band are wearing shorts but even then I'm wearing jeans. My legs are almost see-through and no one wants to see that.
I have no problem with shorts whatsoever if it's hot. I love playing and have been doing this for decades, but I'm not going to die of heatstroke for it. That said - if the gig is a wedding or something formal, etc.., I will always wear the required attire. But for a regular gig on a Friday or Saturday at the local Irish club or bar, in the middle of a summer heat wave....heck I might even play naked.
 


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