How Would Modern Technology Shape You as a Drummer?

SpinaDude

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
876
Reaction score
710
Location
Northwest NJ
Posting on the thread about our first kits made me think back to this...when I start playing as a teenager in the mid 80's, there didn't seem to be a ton of information out there about drums. I had an excellent teacher who showed me a lot about technique and genres. He tried to really open me up to learn more about different forms of music. But that only went so far. He also gave me the very basics on tuning, but that's about it. Other than getting Modern Drummer once a month, the occasional concert or drum clinic VHS and watching drummers on MTV (which I always hated) there wasn't a lot of information out there for a young drummer.

The first time I remember hearing the terms bearing edge and snare bed, was in 2010 when I started playing again. Now there is such an incredible wealth of knowledge and resources out there for drummers, I wonder how it would have changed my learning and playing experience as a kid. Just about anything you want to know is a Google or YouTube search away. Obviously we're always learning and growing, or at least have the ability to do both, but it is so much different when you're a kid; your mind is open, your body is able to respond and adapt better. Your boundaries are further away.

Question is: let's say you were born anywhere between 1995 and 2000...how do you think all of this info would have changed you as a drummer? Between information about woods, knowledge on shell construction, methodologies for building a complete drum, how lathing and hammering a cymbal affects it's sound and performance, playing techniques, beat breakdowns...there's so much. And what about free music to listen to on demand? I know I would have experimented with a lot more jazz and latin music if I'd had the ability to pull up anything I want and listen whenever I want. There's also the ability to record cheaply and get your music out to the masses. We've really tilted 180 degrees from 1985.

What kind of musician would this have turned you into?
 

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,164
Reaction score
880
Location
MD
A better informed one, assuming I took advantage of the information.
 

owr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
Messages
348
Reaction score
216
As a counter point, for the sake of discussion, I often think there is too much information out there now, and the majority of it is of sub-par quality. I think for many (myself included) it can be overwhelming when trying to get into a new thing, and lots of folks resort to coming on forums like this or the like and asking folks to tell them what to buy. This has a sub-optimal side to it, because with the freedom we all have with social media, there are a lot of people giving advice who have no business doing so. So even if back in the day as a kid I'd go to my local music store and ask the sales guy what heads to buy, or even drums or cymbals - at least that person was fairly knowledgeable given their role (I know this isn't necessarily true today in the world of guitar center).

To add to this - all this research can tend to an endless cycle of preparing for a purchase. There was something nice about going to the music store as a kid and saying "I have $200, what kind of drum set can that buy". You'd have 1-3 options in the current used kits, you grab one and then go home and play the heck out of them.
 

Vistalite Black

Ludwigs in the Basement
Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
3,782
Reaction score
1,616
Location
North Carolina
Spinadude, I’m surprised you didn’t list YouTube because it has more impact
in new drummers than anything you listed.

With YouTube, you can not only watch pro drummers play just about any song you can name, but can find drummers break down those songs part by part.

Along with drum less tracks, YouTube puts today’s drummers miles ahead of people who had to learn from books or records that didn’t show you anything.

OWR, I couldn’t disagree with you more. In the past, the worst what-to-buy advice from commissioned sales “experts” and store owners who would recommend only the few brands they had relationships with.

Access to more information and more choices is always better.
 

SpinaDude

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
876
Reaction score
710
Location
Northwest NJ
Spinadude, I’m surprised you didn’t list YouTube because it has more impact
in new drummers than anything you listed.

With YouTube, you can not only watch pro drummers play just about any song you can name, but can find drummers break down those songs part by part.

Along with drum less tracks, YouTube puts today’s drummers miles ahead of people who had to learn from books or records that didn’t show you anything.

OWR, I couldn’t disagree with you more. In the past, the worst what-to-buy advice from commissioned sales “experts” and store owners who would recommend only the few brands they had relationships with.

Access to more information and more choices is always better.
I put it in there, dude. 2nd graph. YouTube is an amazing resource, if, as owr said, you know how to sift through the chaff. I'm on there constantly.
 
Last edited:

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,293
Reaction score
486
Judging by when you started taking lessons we're about the same age, and I've thought about what you said in your post a lot.
I too had a great teach, and I had the same experience with terms, tuning, and all that.
With some exceptions, the younger generations have a tremendous advantage.
When I was finishing HS home computers were just becoming an everyday appliance.
Albiet, it's about the individual, and how much passion they have.
The disadvantages of the guy's today.
Most haven't had the real life student -teach relationship. A good teacher would have a lesson plan. In my case, and I'm sure many others, they wouldn't build relationships that may, or may not give them a huge head start. A teacher can not only point out flaws, but physically correct them.

Now with a drummer with the passion, and technology at their fingers, the world is at their disposal.
I'm in my 40's, and just learning how to record using an interface, DAW, and all that. It seems like every half educated person mid 30's, and younger can make amazing sounding drum tracks, with multiple video angles.
If I want to study with just about anyone I wanted today, that too is at your fingertips.
There are now tons of platforms to show your music at, and unless you're me, get good, or bad feedback.
For purposes other than drums, there's not a day that goes by when I didn't wish I could do everything over at 15, or so.
There could be an argument for both sides, but today's passionate young drummer with some talent can learn far more in a week than we could in months.
So if had a time machine, I'd definitely use it
 

snappy

Very well Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
911
Better faster (YouTube) and no rewinding cassettes and lifting the needle off the record over and over to replay a pesky part.
 

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,293
Reaction score
486
I would have learned the Blushda much sooner!
That was from a Drumeo guest if I remember correctly? Geez, his name slipped my aging mind, but it was David Lee Roth's drummer. Without modern technology I would have thought that was a misspell, or jibberish
 

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,293
Reaction score
486
Wow, he was young. Gregg Bissonette also talks about it. This guy Holmes is great!
 

Matched Gripper

Very well Known Member
Joined
May 28, 2019
Messages
640
Reaction score
479
Wow, he was young. Gregg Bissonette also talks about it. This guy Holmes is great!
Steve Holmes says that video was made in the 90’s. He has dozens of great instructional vids on the tube. Someone recently posted 5 more recent vids on GFO.
 

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,293
Reaction score
486
He's a talent, and a hard worker. It looks like Steve was talking about the "Blushda" long before
Bissonette. Good find!
 

ARGuy

DFO Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
4,334
Reaction score
789
Location
Minnesota
Access to more information and more choices is always better.
Access to more information and choices is always more, but it's not always better. Or, putting it another way, being more informed is not the same as being better informed.
For a young player just starting out it's the musical equivalent of winning the lottery. The answers to all of their questions and the information they need to get any gig or sell a million downloads is right there, most of it free, and you don't even have to leave your house! So how come it doesn't work that way for everyone that wants it to?
I think there's something to the concept that the amount of success, and satisfaction that goes with that success, is related to the amount of work that goes into it. In high school I really got into the contemporary big bands that were around at that time. I bought lots of records and listened to anything I could find on the radio. I got the chance to go hear the Stan Kenton band when my high school band director, who knew I was interested, had a free ticket to see the band at the Prom Ballroom. All I had to do was get there. So I talked my parents into letting me use the car, got out the phone book, found the address, and got out a map and figured out how to get there. I made it to my first professional big band concert (with this young long haired kid named Peter Erskine on drums) and was almost overwhelmed by what I saw and heard and experienced - things that the same concert, were it available on YouTube, couldn't even touch. I've never forgotten that night because I realize that even though I was given a free chance at that experience, I still had to do some work and take a chance, which may not sound like much now, but for a quiet high school kid from a small town venturing into the big city, it was a big step.
Then there's the concept of what to do with all the information you can get for little or no effort. Observing is not the same as experiencing, and the information you get from YouTube is strictly observational until you can find a way to make it a personal experience, and the way you do that is the pretty much the same as it's always been - leaving the safety and comfort of staring at a screen and experiencing the real world. You're not going to become a great rock or jazz or metal or latin or funk drummer from staring at a screen or even from practicing what you observe from staring at that screen. You still need to get out of your practice space and find real experiences.
Back to the lottery concept. How many big lottery winners crash and burn? How many children that come from extreme wealth crash and burn? They've been given the most access to the most information and most choices and it's not always better.
 

Matched Gripper

Very well Known Member
Joined
May 28, 2019
Messages
640
Reaction score
479
He's a talent, and a hard worker. It looks like Steve was talking about the "Blushda" long before
Bissonette. Good find!
In that video, he says, to his knowledge, it was originated by Tony Williams. Here's a more recent video from Steve Holmes (looks like 2018), doing a "revisit" of the Blushda!


PS: Here's another great lesson from Steve Holmes on metric modulation. You've gotta love the ironic humor.

 
Last edited:

jaymandude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2020
Messages
431
Reaction score
388
Access to more information and choices is always more, but it's not always better. Or, putting it another way, being more informed is not the same as being better informed.
For a young player just starting out it's the musical equivalent of winning the lottery. The answers to all of their questions and the information they need to get any gig or sell a million downloads is right there, most of it free, and you don't even have to leave your house! So how come it doesn't work that way for everyone that wants it to?
I think there's something to the concept that the amount of success, and satisfaction that goes with that success, is related to the amount of work that goes into it. In high school I really got into the contemporary big bands that were around at that time. I bought lots of records and listened to anything I could find on the radio. I got the chance to go hear the Stan Kenton band when my high school band director, who knew I was interested, had a free ticket to see the band at the Prom Ballroom. All I had to do was get there. So I talked my parents into letting me use the car, got out the phone book, found the address, and got out a map and figured out how to get there. I made it to my first professional big band concert (with this young long haired kid named Peter Erskine on drums) and was almost overwhelmed by what I saw and heard and experienced - things that the same concert, were it available on YouTube, couldn't even touch. I've never forgotten that night because I realize that even though I was given a free chance at that experience, I still had to do some work and take a chance, which may not sound like much now, but for a quiet high school kid from a small town venturing into the big city, it was a big step.
Then there's the concept of what to do with all the information you can get for little or no effort. Observing is not the same as experiencing, and the information you get from YouTube is strictly observational until you can find a way to make it a personal experience, and the way you do that is the pretty much the same as it's always been - leaving the safety and comfort of staring at a screen and experiencing the real world. You're not going to become a great rock or jazz or metal or latin or funk drummer from staring at a screen or even from practicing what you observe from staring at that screen. You still need to get out of your practice space and find real experiences.
Back to the lottery concept. How many big lottery winners crash and burn? How many children that come from extreme wealth crash and burn? They've been given the most access to the most information and most choices and it's not always better.
There’s a lot to discuss here, about this and things related to this. We would have to transcribe and condense the multiple long conversations I have with some of my friends every month or so.
It involves a bigger aspect of society and technology. And of course what is lost and what is gained by all of it.

I won’t go into it. Honestly I don’t have the energy to clarify my thoughts. But it’s definitely something I’m aware of
 

Mcjnic

DFO Master
Joined
Dec 28, 2010
Messages
3,211
Reaction score
1,861
I would have had better cooking skills in my younger days.
Not sure how that would impact my drumming, other than to give me a bigger smile after lunch.
But, there ya go.
 


Top