How young is TOO young?

dyland

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Stick Control was also a joke...At any age it's a surefire way to suck the fun out of it.

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dyland

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I never said it wasn't worthwhile, just that it's not fun, and best left to the self motivated.
I mean, obviously it's not relevant to a 4 year old, but there are infinite interpretations you can use for pg. 1 alone, so many of which can be incredibly fun, so long as you enjoy practicing in general.

That said, playing directly off the page? Yeah, not that fun.
 

toddbishop

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Give her some percussion instruments to play with and leave her alone. If you get her a teacher get someone specifically trained to teach young children. If you harbor any dreams of turning her into a child prodigy, seek psychiatric care immediately.
 

Peter_Drake_teacher

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Give her some percussion instruments to play with and leave her alone. If you get her a teacher get someone specifically trained to teach young children. If you harbor any dreams of turning her into a child prodigy, seek psychiatric care immediately.
What I want is for her to enjoy playing as much as I do. I wish I had started early.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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I used to teach chemistry at university. How would I know about drum teaching to kids?
Walter White the hell out of it then .. Meth is like Adderal on steroids: it will increase the kid's capacity to focus something fierce!!!


Absolutely kidding, that goes without saying.

For a little while years ago, I teached Karate to 4-5-6 y/olds. The attention span was extremely short and everything needed to be divided in small segments of learning, often the material to be learned had to be disguised as a game to keep things light and fun. The 40 minute lessons were chopped up in many different segments. with recess-like "release moments" sprinkled in between each one, where the kids could just randomly let out their energy surplus.

Good luck with your grand kid, just don't push it too hard, keep things light and fun and it might just become this unique awesome thing that your share for years to come.

I bought my daughter a drumset when she was very young. She showed promise, had a reasonable capacity to hold a basic Billie Jean beat but soon interest came and went when it became any more complicated. It wasn't before last year when she picked up bass of her own volition (at 12y/o) that she actually diciplined herself into putting some effort in learning. And you know what? I'm glad she actually switched to bass, that way it is easier to play together...
 
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JDA

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swarfrat

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My 9yo doesn't really play the drums any more.. but he voraciously gobbles any chemistry information he can access. He made out like a bandit this christmas between the two grandma's. The one thing that dwarfs them all? The little $10 organic chemistry model set I gave him.
 

Tornado

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A lot of four-year-olds are much more capable than many DFOers are giving them credit for, but I'm surprised no one has mentioned hearing protection yet.


This kid seems to be having fun, I think he enjoys the attention from the crowd more, but he's feeling the music. But to put that on TV? What's that all about? How much work did his parents put into making that happen? Seems unhealthy. I have the same thoughts about Nandi Bushell, although she's older which makes it less troubling. Nothing she's done has been without an absolute ****load of parental involvement. Which is cool on one level, doing stuff like this as a family is fun, challenging, and rewarding. But it's a lot of work and pressure.

One of the hardest things as a parent of a talented kid is to not get upset or angry when you see them not putting in work to build on what they've already achieved. It may seem like they are squandering a great gift, but in reality they are just being kids. You have to remember that they are just kids. As a parent, your perception of time is WAY different than theirs. You see 5 years as a blink of an eye, they see 5 years as half of a lifetime.
 

RIDDIM

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My grand daughter (aged four, bless her) has seen my kit at home and is fascinated by the whole business of drumming. She has announced that she wants to play too, like her grand dad. What would you say is the best age to start and do I set about it with her? Her feet don't even touch the pedals on the bass and hi hat! Advice?
TIA
Peter
Whenever she wants to. It needs to be fun for her though - don't kill the fun. There's be time enough to buckle down as she gets older.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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God I hope so. I am SO looking forward to it all
And yes - the Walter White thing? HOW many times did I get asked if I could make meth?
I'm very sorry, I can't even begin to fathom to what extend this has become the de-facto reference for pretty much anything chemistry related. And how annoying that must be for you serious academicians and scientists.

Anyhoo, I meant no disrespect, it was all in jest, if somewhat clumsy.
 

Vistalite Black

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This kid seems to be having fun, I think he enjoys the attention from the crowd more, but he's feeling the music. But to put that on TV? What's that all about? How much work did his parents put into making that happen? Seems unhealthy. I have the same thoughts about Nandi Bushell, although she's older which makes it less troubling. Nothing she's done has been without an absolute ****load of parental involvement. Which is cool on one level, doing stuff like this as a family is fun, challenging, and rewarding. But it's a lot of work and pressure.

One of the hardest things as a parent of a talented kid is to not get upset or angry when you see them not putting in work to build on what they've already achieved. It may seem like they are squandering a great gift, but in reality they are just being kids. You have to remember that they are just kids. As a parent, your perception of time is WAY different than theirs. You see 5 years as a blink of an eye, they see 5 years as half of a lifetime.
The kid is obviously enjoying himself. To me, it's far more destructive to have 9- to 11-year-old Little Leaguers playing on ESPN or, worse yet, sending 16-year-old gymnasts (and figure skaters) out to complete in the Olympics on worldwide TV. I don't think many young drummers have developed eating disorders.
 

toddbishop

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What I want is for her to enjoy playing as much as I do. I wish I had started early.

That's up to her! All you can do is be a good example, show her some things if she's interested, make sure she's surrounded by a lot of good music.
 

dcrigger

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It always amazes me how many people (particularly drummers) feel that actually learning to play the drums in a traditional manner is not funny and somehow oppressive.

4,5,6 year olds are right in the center of learning very basic things to a great degree though the use of simple repetitive tasks... recognizing "sight" words, simple number games, counting games, simple memorizations tasks... over and over... and if taught well with great glee and enthusiasm.

IMO it is not a time for "finding yourself on an instrument", "seeing what you can come up" - that is the path (at that age for immediate boredom, lack of progress/feeling of accomplishment and discouragement leading to zero desire to continue.

Learning drumming for kids (or anyone to a degree) needs to be broken down into bite size tasks/challenges, each building on the last.

So my take here is, if you want her to love it, you have to set her up to succeed... because she absolutely won't be able to by herself... not at that age.

Perfect scenario, find a teacher that knows what they are doing and that has considerable experience teaching young ones - and four is very young - doable, but very young.

Or just relax and wait a bit - she hasn't even started kindergarten... she's probably just now starting to really focus on tasks.... at all. This ability will improve by leaps and bounds over the next few years. Why burn through her potential interest with a most likely failure? Why not let her just eye your drums, tap on the a bit - and see if she comes to wanting it a few years from now... when hopefully her mom and dad will start thinking about leading her to "You should take music lessons... what instrument would would like to try?" But this really doesn't (and possibly shouldn't) get asked until she's 9 or 10.

My point is plopping her in front of child size drum set is approaching it like a toy - and just like all of her toys, she'll play with it for a bit, lose interest and move on to the next toy. Treat it like learning an instrument - From Day One - with proper support is then giving her an experience that will matter, even if she only tries it for a short time.

My 2 cents...
 

mebeatee

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I’ve “taught” folks as young as two and it’s a hoot. There is wonderful “chemistry” involved, just like any musical chemistry when exploring. I “explore” musical sounds/instruments and how they can go together with folks this young. One’s environment and gear at hand can be paramount. I have two drum kits, an upright piano, African marimba, dumbeck’s, and a wall of perc. instruments all ready to go all the time. This is in my house as I teach from home. Our house is basically a giant musical instrument containing musical instruments..... It’s also easy to set up a Wavedrum or Handsonic, or a laptop with midi keys.....you get the idea.....
First on the agenda is the issue of hearing and then how the instrument is approached as such......ie if they immediately go to a drum set I’ll give them a blastick to initially explore the sounds of the kit and how loud and quiet drums can be, then take it from there.
At present the youngest I teach/instruct is 5 and the oldest is 72. The 5 yr. old has been playing since age 4, jamming with his dad....a guitar player, and the 72 yr old just started about 6 mo. ago.....so the adage of you’re never too young or too old rings true.
bt
 

JimmyM

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I started teaching myself simple beats by the age of 5 on my drumset of wooden kindergarten blocks with 1" dowels for sticks. I once jammed with a 2 year old who was very solid, if not fancy. No time like the present.
 


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