Hybrid kit multipad

JonnyFranchi$e

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Hey all. I'm an acoustic drummer. But I keep thinking it would be really fun in a live context to have some samples. For certain songs or solos or whatever.

Here's what I would like:

- Vintage like 70s and 80s synthesizer drums. Like those Simmons kits from in the day where the toms are like "deeeuw deeeuw" - and the 80s gated reverb snares.

- Also some interesting percussion sounds - world drums, basic percussion.

- Good presets and simple to use -- so I can do my homework to get the sounds I want, create my own sets and then load them SUPER easy live

- Reasonably priced.


Initially I like the Yamaha DTX muti thingy. I have a DTX electro kit at home. So the snare and kick and stuff would already be compatible if I ever want to do that.

But are there other options that would better do what I want? Especially the super cheesy vintage drum machine and electro kit sounds. 808 sounds. Vintage Simmons. Etc.

Any advice from those in the know would be helpful.

Not sure I'm gonna go buying anything right away, but I'm curious about this.

Thanks
 

bpaluzzi

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The Yamaha DTX Multi 12 has an extremely diverse set of factory sounds, but has very limited ability to import additional sounds (only 64MB of storage)

The Roland SPD-SX has a much more limited factory set, but has a lot more storage space (4GB or 16GB, depending on the version).

The Roland also has a simpler interface, but lacks some of the deep MIDI capabilities that the Yamaha does.

I put together a video that contrasts these two models specifically:

There's also the Alesis Strike Pro Multipad. It has decent reviews, but I haven't personally used one.
 

bassanddrum84

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I use a Roland and sometimes a alesis sample pad for sounds and samples. The Roland blows the alesis out of the water but the alesis works great too. Really only complaint with the alesis is that the controls get hit from time to time changing scenes saved and not as customizable as Roland.
 

JonnyFranchi$e

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@bpaluzzi what a GREAT video! Thanks for sharing.

The video is very pro-Roland, which makes sense for what you're doing with these. But for me, I think the vid sold the Yamaha a little more for my purposes.

Pros:

Lots of great internal sounds. I bet I could find most of the sounds I'm looking for in there.

I already have a DTX e-kit in my office. So this would integrate well for studio work.

More pads

A little cheaper

Cons:

Less ability to run long loops and load my own samples and such (but I don't think I would use a lot of LONG samples or a LOT of my own sounds. Maybe I'm wrong).

Less ability to set up songs for a specific set list. This could be a bummer, but my guess is I would only use this a couple times for each long gig. Set up my 2 or 3 kits next to each other and it should be fine.


So the cons are not that important for what I'm doing.


Final question: THIS IS THE SOUND I am looking for:


If I could somehow LOAD this into a multi pad unit to have sets made up of these sounds, plus some good internal percussion things perhaps, it would be PERFECT.

Could I somehow do that with the Yamaha? Say I got this plugin, tweaked it in the DAW to get my own 12-drum set. Then create a wav for each. Then load each one into the Yamaha and assign each one to different pad to make my own vintage Simmons sounding set.

Would that work?
 

bpaluzzi

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@bpaluzzi what a GREAT video! Thanks for sharing.

The video is very pro-Roland, which makes sense for what you're doing with these. But for me, I think the vid sold the Yamaha a little more for my purposes.
It's interesting that that's the way you took the video -- I honestly tried to keep it pretty neutral, as I do like both pieces of gear a lot. They just do different things well. For my personal stuff, I'm using the Yamaha rig 70% of the time, just because of the increased power/flexibility it has.

Pros:

Lots of great internal sounds. I bet I could find most of the sounds I'm looking for in there.

I already have a DTX e-kit in my office. So this would integrate well for studio work.

More pads

A little cheaper

Cons:

Less ability to run long loops and load my own samples and such (but I don't think I would use a lot of LONG samples or a LOT of my own sounds. Maybe I'm wrong).

Less ability to set up songs for a specific set list. This could be a bummer, but my guess is I would only use this a couple times for each long gig. Set up my 2 or 3 kits next to each other and it should be fine.
Yup, I think that's a fair list. The MIDI capabilities of the Yamaha are also much more robust.

So the cons are not that important for what I'm doing.


Final question: THIS IS THE SOUND I am looking for:


If I could somehow LOAD this into a multi pad unit to have sets made up of these sounds, plus some good internal percussion things perhaps, it would be PERFECT.

Could I somehow do that with the Yamaha? Say I got this plugin, tweaked it in the DAW to get my own 12-drum set. Then create a wav for each. Then load each one into the Yamaha and assign each one to different pad to make my own vintage Simmons sounding set.

Would that work?
Yup, you can absolutely do that. Most of my internal samples on my Yamaha are exactly that -- analog drum sounds created from my Drumbrute, sampled and stored. Make sure you save it as a 16-bit WAV (or AIFF), but otherwise it's very straightforward.
 


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