I am loving a heavy ride these days.

nickrobotron

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My go-to ride cymbal weight was around 2700-2800g for my band (60's influenced Brit rock). But once I added a right side crash that I could crash/ride on, I found myself wanting a little more ping with my main ride. I moved toward the 602 Modern Essentials ride (which I still think is an absolutely perfect ride). The 602 started to feel light to me so I moved toward the Masters Crisp Ride, which is very heavy at 3300g. It doesn't crash well, but I get a very articulate ping that I have fallen in love with. It's a hard move for me to have such a one dimensional ride in the main slot, but so much of the music I love has this kind of distinctive ride sound. I want to keep things simple, but there isn't a substitute for that meaty ping that is all over 60's and 70's music. Has anyone else here ever surrendered to the classic ride sound on a somewhat minimalist set up? I just can't imagine having a 3 cymbal set up anymore (hi hats, crash, ride).
 

Phantomlimb777

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My 24” Agop TW is 3490g, I love dark, heavy cymbals in the ride position! I used to crash my paiste 2002 power ride all the time, some of them just open up if you know what you’re doing. I do that thing where all my cymbals are rides and crashes.
 

CC Cirillo

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I’m with ya.

I’ve got a Sabian HH Raw Bell Dry Ride that I seem to recall being around 3100 grammys, or about one quincy jones.

My first Sabian, and unfortunately for my wallet probably not my last. Very pingalicous with some meaty undertones. Only got to use it once before Covid shut down everything, but I was smitten.

Seems to me—at least on this forum—that thin rides are the vogue. The reason for that is obvious. But when I concocted an excuse for “having to have” a new ride, I found the idea of getting something very different from my other rides got the most traction, and the spread between the HHRBDR and my next heaviest K is about 400 grammys, or one beck.

I think it’ll do well in my covers band. Heavier rides can be found quite cheaply secondhand. I wouldn’t want one as my only ride, but they are a great third ride. And if your stable is up to five and you don’t have at least one heavy, you might want to ask yourself maybe it’s time I stop only wearing black t shirts.
7F42F0DF-2041-41F0-BA45-655C66E8943C.jpeg
 

Ptrick

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I have a ton a thin, trashy dark jazz rides. The bands I play in only play a bit of jazzy stuff-most is blues, funk, rock. (I did play jazz almost exclusively for over a decade).
What I use 90% of the time is a darker heavy ride. A few go to’s:

22 Istanbul Agop Idris Muhammad ride
22 Paiste Masters dark crisp
22 Istanbul Agop traditional heavy
21 Meinl Byzance Heavy Ride

My minimum is usually a crash, ride, China, hats. Lately I’ve been using two crashes and the ride and China.

The hard part for me is finding heavy rides that are still dark. Here’s an example of my Agop traditional (a very heavy ride) that is still nice and dark in the stick sound.

 

D. B. Cooper

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I have a ton a thin, trashy dark jazz rides. The bands I play in only play a bit of jazzy stuff-most is blues, funk, rock. (I did play jazz almost exclusively for over a decade).
What I use 90% of the time is a darker heavy ride. A few go to’s:

22 Istanbul Agop Idris Muhammad ride
22 Paiste Masters dark crisp
22 Istanbul Agop traditional heavy
21 Meinl Byzance Heavy Ride

My minimum is usually a crash, ride, China, hats. Lately I’ve been using two crashes and the ride and China.

The hard part for me is finding heavy rides that are still dark. Here’s an example of my Agop traditional (a very heavy ride) that is still nice and dark in the stick sound.

Man. That thing sounds reallllllllly nice...
 

JDA

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You can get low and dark and still have weight.
having the Reserve weight of thunder is (sometimes like always) necessary (even on a local St. Pat's accordion trio in a Fireplace chain restaurant gig)
22" K Dark Medium 3013g
22" Old K New Stamp 2877g
applies to 14s (bottoms or tops) 16s and 18s too
It's the shape and lathing that can bend weight into a low and dark yet penetrating cymbal with a reserve of power to slay an accordion let alone an electric guitar
 

JDA

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What always stuck in my mind as like "what?" was a catalog description (of Canadian K' models) in an old Gretsch (1981) catalog...

K. Hi Hats.
Dark Crash.
Crash Ride.
Ride.
and then this one..

Heavy Ride - " Extra weight means more bronze, and therefor more tonal color. The exciting dark sound , the " K sound" , is even more pronounced, while stick sound is dry and definite"
~
Kinda said it all. That was possible.
No emphasis on pitch going up although that was one of many aspect to it.
So, the highs, mediums, and lows, just, bigger. Yea, Bigger. ; )
It takes a certain build to do that right where all three -hi mid & lows- increasing.
 
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NobleCooleyNut

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I have done both the dark trashy ride thing and the bright pinky ride thing and both have their merits depending on the genre of music you are playing. I keep two sets of cymbals for may current gigs.
Set 1 for my Rock and Pop gigs is a Paiste set up containing :
15' 602 ME hihats
16' and 18" 602 thin crashes
18" 602 ME crash
I keep a few different rides to use with these cymbals - 24" Paiste Masters Deep Groove ride ; 20" 602 Medium ride and recently acquired 20" Paiste Masters Dark Crisp ride. You will not these rides mainly have a pronounced stick definition with some underlying wash.

For my Jazz and Big Band Gigs I have Sabian set up consisting of:
14" HHX Complex medium hihats
18" HHX Legacy crash
19" Artisan crash
Rides are : 20" Artisan light ride ; 20" AAX Prototype ride ; a soon to arrive 21" HH Raw Bell Dry ride
The Raw Bell was acquired in a trade for an Artisan Medium ride .

The Heavy, Pingy ride was so prevalent in the Rock Music of the 70's and 80's that many of us grew up on. I like to find rides that have good stick definition but are crashble, the 20" 602 Medium ride excels at this and allows me to take a set up consisting of just a ride, single crash and hihats for some of my smaller room gigs and not miss the second crash.


I quote like that Istanbul Agop Traditional 22" heavy ride - it is something that I would consider purchasing.
 

Rock Salad

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My oldish A is pretty heavy. It sure took some getting used to and lots of tape at first but, now the tape is almost gone and my sticks have figured out how to get a pretty decent crash out of it too.
Now it's hard to play any other. Guess it grew on me/with me, we're sticking together.
 

Tama CW

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I've been playing my 60's 22" A (3400 gm) since the early 80's. It just seems to work even if it is "only" about half crashable. And I've never found a 22" 60's or 70's A I wanted to replace it with, even much lighter ones down to 2400 gm. It has a perfect bell and stick with a constant "hum" underneath it all. I'll take 2.5 out of 3. I always thought this was a real heavy beast............until I ran across my 22" Hollow Logo 70's Flat Ride at 3900+ gms. Now that's a beast. And my 20" heavy ride (ping?) at almost 3000 gm gives them both plenty of competiton. But neither of those other two can crash like the my original one.
 
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michiganice91

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Nick I think you would love a 602 22" HEAVY or an older 22" Sound Creation Bell Ride. 2 of my absolute favorite rock cymbals.
 

mkelley

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My 22" Paiste Dark Crisp ride is around 2,900 and is divine. Best bell I've heard from any brand.
 

wraub

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My 22" is a 60s Zildjian that weighs 3110 gm, and I'm honestly unsure if I really like it.
 
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CC Cirillo

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(I think I’ve said this before on here somewhere but) I feel like I get a cymbal and it sounds one way just playing alone, and it sounds very different when I’m playing it within a band context live. Took me years to learn this and I guess I’m still learning. I think a heavier cymbal for me is a good example. Some of my thinner cymbals seem to eat vocals, not in volume but in the way they sound, where they recline in the total mix of the band’s sound. For example, I’ve got a lovely K Constantinople Medium ride. Just everything one could want in a thinner cymbal. Words that we all like use to describe certain cymbals: “dark”… “crashes well”…“causes beatnik women to cast off their berets”. So much fun to play from behind the driver’s seat with nuances anywhere I hit it. But at a certain volume rehearsing it just gets a low undertone and rumble that blends in and out with two of the three singers I work with, and covers up their nuances. Some of my other lighter cymbals do that a bit as well.

Enter my medium to heavy cymbal(s): To my ear—and perhaps a few bandmates’ ears and microphones—medium and heavy cymbals might occupy a different space. I’ll admit that a lot of my medium weight rides I’m not that crazy about alone, but Lord do they play well with others. I feel the same way with my heavy Sabian RBDR.
 

Seb77

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Some of my thinner cymbals seem to eat vocals,
It's interesting, the typical singer's formant (overtone presence), most notable with classical singing, lines up with the typical ride cymbal overtone presence, around 2.5kHz. The vowel formants of i,e,a,o,u (Italian pronunciation) sit at frequencies also present in cymbals. The consonant sounds f,s,t etc. sit in the same range as the sizzle and ping aspects of cymbals sound. So, a ride cymbal is very likely to cover up a singer's articulation, more so with more wash and sizzle. No surprise a dry, heavy ride lets more of the vocals come through.
 

multijd

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For me it has to do with room size and volume. Heavier is better for big rooms where I need volume. Otherwise I go as light as possible. I mainly play jazz.
 

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