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I don't own a metal snare. Should I?

lossforgain

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I've had some pretty decent wood drums over the years (4x14, 5x14 DW 10&6, 5.5x14 Pearl Masters) and always found them to be very one-dimensional.

Decent drums, sure, but not all that different from one another. In ply snares, I like the Ludwig Classic Maple far more than the Collectors or the Masters stuff. And I haven’t even played a Canopus, which people rave about. I admit was mostly playing metal snares like you until Summit Drums came along. My curly maple 6.5x14 hasn’t left my main stand for awhile.

Reality check(not that I’m not a hoarder!) You could live in perfect harmony with just one snare drum

This is true too, if you could only keep one then something like a Supra or a Black Beauty makes a lot of sense. For me right now it would be very hard to choose one to stick with and give up all the rest.
 

lossforgain

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…with the exception of my 5” Ludwig Engraved Black Beauty . This is my go to snare and old reliable . I have no interest in any other metal shell snare drum .
@cochlea I think this says it well. If you find a metal drum that really speaks to you, there might be a special bond there. I have a wonderful bronze Supraphonic that is a keeper for me like that. I played it at a gig recently and other musicians were running over to see what drum it was, they loved it so much.

You only “need” the instrument that inspires you to be a better player.
 

notINtheband

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My current three favorite snares are 1. Brass, 2. Brass, and 3. Wood
I’ve always been drawn to the ring and overtones of a carefully tuned brass drum.
I’m currently using a 14x8” maple/Walnut snare with the group I play with as it’s the right balance of depth of tone and warmth. But my backup snares for this gig are both brass as they bring that distinctive deep ring without sounding out of control.
Tuning is everything when using metal drums in my experience. I’ve played several that I found lacking until I discovered the tuning that brings out their personality.

But if I could only keep 2 drums, both would be brass.
 

florian1

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gotta have at least two on stage with you. Never know when one will break.


Not really , I gigged for many years w only one snare and a spare head.

A lot easier to swap a snare than to do a head change. That takes time. On stage, you dont have that luxury.

F
 

dwdave

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There are lots of great metal snares and I'm sure all the ones listed here would be great. I will offer my 2 cents.... Get a Oriollo Mangana (Manganese) snare. Not really loud, kinda like a Supra on steroids, does everything well. A used Sonar Ferro Manganese would be a great option as well.
 

Tama CW

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The sharper and higher pitched crack of a metal snare is distinctly different than the thuddier sound of a wood shell. And it's not about cutting through guitars
or even your own drum set when at home. I spent years never thinking there was a decent metal snare out there. Tried Tama's and Yamaha's. Then Acro's. Then Slngerland COB's and COS's.
Didn't really like any of them. The Slingerland "student" COA is pretty good. And then I found 60's Supra's....5x14 is fine. I like those the best and they give me a pleasing sound with power and finesse.
Now I have 3 Supra's but will only keep one. One is higher pitched and ringy (pure stock) and the other a bit deeper in tone with the brass hoops and emperor batter.

My problem with wood snares.....is I have yet to find one of those I really like. Still looking. In the end, I'm going to say the tone you get from either wood or metal snares is highly dependent on your play, your tuning skills, the heads and wires......probably more so than the shells. Just tried my first Ludwig Vistalite snare drum....and hey.....it sounds like a metal 80's Yamaha or Tama to me. Go figure!
 

katulu

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If aluminum, brass, or steel didn't do it for you, maybe titanium or bell bronze will give you something different and good.
 

Renoroger

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When I worked retail I got many questions from Drummer‘s deciding whether or not to add a splash, China or a double pedal. I found it most logical to suggest if they could play a couple of nights with their bands and not finish by saying “ that would have been great if only I had ‘~~~~~’” then I suggested they might not need one.
Now, WANT is a whole ‘nother rationale…!
 

pwc1141

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I have only ever had one metal snare drum ... a Sonor mirror finish chrome 14 x 4. It was expensive and looked great but the band leader at the time said ..."Nice, but metal snare drums don't "sing" like wooden ones". I heeded that and went to wood and haven't gone back. That was 25 years ago ....and I have loved deep stave shell 12" snares for the last 15 years or so.
 

Drdrumdude3009

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I typically ran a metal and a wood for every gig. My preferred pair was a 13X7” walnut of unknown origins and a Pork Pie steel. I had a DW Concrete that I had in the rotation with a broken glass DW Collectors in Maple. I still have the Pork Pie somewhere. I got an even cooler 13X7” snare from the dead Brit and that is an awesome drum.
 

Murat

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I am a big fan of wood snares myself and if there is one exception , that is aluminum. BUT, not all aluminum snares are created equal either. An Acro sounds nothing like the cast aluminums like the Alloy Classic and that one sounds nothing like the Yamaha RC Aluminum.
I vote for the RC Aluminum for overall versatility :)
 

Iristone

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Hobbyist Craviotto... :eek:

Personally my two faves are a 6.5" wood and a 5.5" metal: Ludwig Legacy and Jinbao hammered copper, respectively. Definitely a sharper, more expansive attack from the latter, without the stinging shrillness of a steel snare.
My aluminium Premier OTOH, sounds quite a bit drier and hollower in comparison. It's very lightweight, though, but I'd still get a copper-based alloy (e.g. brass) for a first metal snare.
 

Reynfield

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I recently picked up a Sakae 14x5 aluminum snare mint. Honestly my old acro from 1970 kills it. It's a nice looking drum but it has the over the top untame overtone that's hard to tune out. If you do not hit the drum dead center it sounds very honky. I may have to try a different head combo. Usually a g1/ ambassador is pretty versatile. But maybe I got a dud? Love aluminum snares. Brass too. The RC aluminum is a great drum. Used one on a back line not long ago. With the infamous stage customs. Lol
 


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