I finally understand Ringo!

RhythmGJ

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And they all look 12 to me.

“You’re the doctor?!?” (sees Doogie Howser but doesn’t say it out loud)...


GJ
 

NewBeat

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Unfortunately the older I get, the more I realize that doctors are like weather people. They take a good guess, but don't really know what is up.
The (luckily) very few times I've been to a doctor, they either totally misdiagnosed or had no idea whatsoever what the problem was. My impression is that if you go in with a gunshot wound or car accident, i.e., something acute & obvious, you'll get adequate, pertinent treatment, other than that not so much.
 

retroplate

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I'll begin by saying that I arrived late to the party when it comes to listening to The Beatles. Yes, I've heard them throughout my life, know many of the songs, and appreciate and respect their contribution to modern music. I much prefer the older recordings and never cared much for Magical Mystery Tour or ironically, Sgt. Pepper's.

That said, this post appeared in my You Tube feed yesterday and blew me away. I'm enamored, and now completely understand the love and praise for Ringo. I can't stop listening and loving everything about it. I'm a big Steve Jordan fan and good lawd do I hear the influence now!

I've said it before but it's worth repeating - The best thing about music is that it knows no age, no time, and no circumstance. It's there for us always, waiting to be discovered and enjoyed, limitless in its reach and powerful in its influence.

What did it for me was the Ed Sullivan 50th Anniversary show. i was hosting a jam and watched as Gregg Bissonette (great drummer) and Kenny Aronoff (great drummer) played. The sound from the TV was off but when Ringo got up to play, I immediately understood why Ringo is so hard to duplicate; he puts a lot of his own personality into his playing and that's almost impossible to duplicate. It wasn't like i didn't respect Ringo or his playing before that. This is where it came together.

Mike

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RhythmGJ

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Bringing the Doogie Howser, Ringo, and Beatles strands together... Training up the next generation:



GJ
 

drichardbailey

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I think what the “Purdie thing” was an extortion operation, basically Bernard trying to get himself money, he said as much in his Max Weinberg interview and the threat was disclosure in his upcoming book if he didn’t get it.

Well, the book never materialized so somebody either paid him or he learned Mal Evans style to keep his mouth shut.

Evans, Beatles Roadie and man of of missions was murdered by Los Angeles Police, a corrupt a department that ever existed, on January 5th 1976.

The way I recall the story from the Rotten Apple series is that Evans helped McCartney co-write at least one song on their 1966 France/Africa/Rome jaunt.

A dispute arose later between him and McCartney over song writing credits at which point Evans threatened a tell all.

One week prior to handing the manuscript to his publisher Evans is shot and killed by Los Angeles police and the manuscript then disappears, creating its own offshoot in Beatles lore.

As far as Starr’s performance on the “Rooftop”, we are talking roughly five songs off what is arguably the Beatles most musically rudimentary Album.

Cool.
 
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Browny

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At least in some musicians estimation, there is such a thing as a “half shuffle” (not “half time;” just “half”). I think this is the key to a lot of Ringo’s feels, whether you want to believe he was doing it consciously or not.

IMHO, Ringo is great. In one way— the feel and playing-to-the-song way. There are other drummers who are also great; the chops way (Dave Weckl, Buddy Rich, name-your-favorite-chops-guy-here, etc.). But as a drummer and percussionist who is also a songwriter, I’d say IMHO (! YMMV), I much prefer the “song guy.” Even in jazz (which I’m a big fan of), I think guys like Irv Cotler, Grady Tate, and Mel Lewis rule. Which doesn’t mean I don’t LOVE Elvin, Tony Williams, or Jack DeJohnette!!! It’s just different. Some drummers (most truly great ones, I’d wager), bring both skill sets together.

Perhaps an example of what I’m trying to get at from outside the Beatles might be instructive. By today’s standards, Steve Gadd is not the tippy-toppest “chop-guy” in the world, yet I don’t think anyone here would deny that his abilities are formidable. Yet to me one of the most impressive things I ever heard him play/explain (out of MANY, MANY things) was when he showed how he tries to make the attack and length of his ride cymbal notes match that of the bass player! A guy who can smoke the mozambique rhythm and play the %#%* out of “Aja” in one take and play with Chick Corea is hyper-concerned about the simplest, yet possibly most profound inanities of the groove.

In his way, I think that is what Ringo did with the Beatles. If you can hear what I’m saying. Groove and its considerations trumps all, especially in the kind of music they produced. Yet when many of us try to play these “simple” beats, they’re not the same. Because groove concerns are *also* a skill set. Not just chops (which are also awesome and amazing).


GJ
I think 'semi-swung' might be an alternative description to 'half shuffle' that would result in less confusion. And yeah, that's part of the key to Ringo's playing; he's got a bit of that Earl Palmer stuff goin on where it's not quite straight but it's not quite swung/shuffled.
 

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