I just came up with a new drill-free cymbal mount... I think ?????

lcondo123

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Bear with me here. It's finals week for this ol' college student here and I've spent more time daydreaming about being home and playing drums than I'd like to admit. I just recently acquired a Rogers kit with a virgin 28" bass drum that I want to make as show worthy as possible with my band. I am a huge fan of bass mounted toms and ride cymbals, and I want to mount both to this kick drum. Planning on giving Dunnett's bass drum conversion arm a go with being a tom mount for this bass drum, but mounted to the bass drum hoop instead of drilling into the shell.

Then I realized there isn't a mount like this available for a ride cymbal.

There are those mounts that attach to the hoop and have an L-arm attached, but the thought of putting a 22" or 24" ride cymbal on that kind of mount makes me squirm. Don't want to bend or break the hoop with too much weight.

So, in the library today, I spent too much time drawing a concept of a drill-free, dual-ended bass drum cymbal mount that sits on top of the shell. Think of a hybrid between A&F Drum Co.'s kickbone and Dunnett's rail tom mount, where the kickbone-esque tube extends and connects to both bass drum hoops, and in the center is a plate with an L-arm mounted to it. On one end of this plate in the center is an adjustable arm that moves up and down so the plate can sit flat on the bass drum shell to disperse the weight of the cymbal better. In my head this would prevent the plate from slipping, and not put a ton of strain on the bass drum hoops, as the weight of the cymbal rests on the shell, where an L-arm's weight would usually rest.

Take it easy on the drawings. I'm a finance major, not a design major! This was drawn in a 30 minute time frame while highly caffeinated.

Am I insane, or can anyone else see what i'm trying to envision here? Does something like this already exist? I feel like there would be a lot of demand for it for people who are in the same boat as me - preferring bass drum mounted ride cymbals but not wanting to drill holes in a vintage shell.

Humor me. Entertain me. Critique me. Rip me apart. Do something! Needed to share this somewhere.

Thanks!
Luke
 

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GeeDeeEmm

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Hmmmm . . . I like it. That drawing was a good use of time - unless you should have been studying!

Ok. I don't understand why you need the adjustable plate. Seems to me that all you need is a plate large enough to accept a regular shell mount cymbal arm/floor tom leg receiver. You can make up the angle needed to position the cymbal L-arm vertically by simply rotating the arm in the receiver. Of course, you could still retain the L-shape in the mounting plate in order to utilize the rubber stopper against the bass drum shell.

All the other aspects of the design seem right on the money to me. Just eliminate the angle adjustment of the plate, and reduce its size to that of an L-arm receiver (while retaining the rubber stopper) and you're in business.

I think you are on to a good idea for a needed accessory.

GeeDeeEmm
 

lcondo123

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Hmmmm . . . I like it. That drawing was a good use of time - unless you should have been studying!

Ok. I don't understand why you need the adjustable plate. Seems to me that all you need is a plate large enough to accept a regular shell mount cymbal arm/floor tom leg receiver. You can make up the angle needed to position the cymbal L-arm vertically by simply rotating the arm in the receiver. Of course, you could still retain the L-shape in the mounting plate in order to utilize the rubber stopper against the bass drum shell.

All the other aspects of the design seem right on the money to me. Just eliminate the angle adjustment of the plate, and reduce its size to that of an L-arm receiver (while retaining the rubber stopper) and you're in business.

I think you are on to a good idea for a needed accessory.

GeeDeeEmm
Thanks for the legitimate feedback! Glad I’m not completely looney. As for the adjustment part, the logic behind it was that the weight would be distributed better if the plate the cymbal mount was sitting on was flat. In my head I feel it would grip better and slip less, like the angle for the rubber foot on the Dunnett tom arm is at.

I could absolutely be wrong, with which that whole part could be eliminated, which wouldn’t be bad at all. Reducing it to the size of just the L-arm would be ideal!
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Ha! You are not looney, bub! You've come up with a very legitimate solution for a problem that no-drillers face all the time. Just simplify it (reducing costs) and you have a winner. Good on 'ya.

GeeDeeEmm
 

lcondo123

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The more I sit and think about this, I could see Josh over at INDe Drums coming up with something like this. I could imagine seeing some sort of dual ended BR3 mount being attached to the kickbone-style post. That'd be small and neat looking, just as long as it can support itself and the cymbal's weight without being drilled into the shell!
 

indedrum

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Thanks for the heads up on this lcondo123. Interesting idea! I am not sure there is any need for the feet touching the shell (which I always had a problem with on that rail mount you referenced). Our BR3 does the job on it's own, if you want a bit more stability you can always link a front and back version together with a straight rod. No need to touch the shell!
 

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lcondo123

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Well that is literally exactly what I had in mind! Looks like my concoction is unnecessary. I will absolutely do what you did, it's exactly what I was looking for! Cheers, my friend!
 

K.O.

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If you read through that entire thread you'll see that I didn't invent it either. It works very well though. I did find that a memory lock was essential to keep the cross rod from slipping in the claw clamps once you'd played a while
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Chameleon 8-9-13 010.JPG
 


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