I Stink at Painting Hoops

poot

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What is causing the rough spots? There are several layers of primer and paint on this old hoop. Before spraying, I sanded it completely smooth using 400 grit paper followed by steel wool, then wiped it down carefully with a dry cloth. The rough spots appeared immediately upon spraying. Is it a chemical reaction to something from a previous coat? I'm inclined to strip it to bare wood and start all over. Sheesh.
 

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mebeatee

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Is stinking better than sucking? If so then you're ok.
That is pretty weird....never had that prob as I've painted a few hoops without totally stripping the old finish/paint off, like what you have done. Maybe there's some fine print on the paint container that says good only on brand x hoops, and not ok on brand y hoops...lol.
Ya may have to take it down to bare wood as you say. I'm sure the restoration bunch may know....
Or better yet figure out what happened and licence it to the hoop makers so others can have that custom finish. The "spots" sort of look kewl actually...;)...now you have to come up with a spiffy name for that finish.
bt
 

Fat Drummer

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Without any details on product and process, this looks like a second coat of enamel was sprayed to soon after the first. The solvents will eat the previous coat untill completely dry.
 

Tornado

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Without any details on product and process, this looks like a second coat of enamel was sprayed to soon after the first. The solvents will eat the previous coat untill completely dry.
Likely this. Sometimes painting is a ridiculously slow process.
 

poot

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Without any details on product and process, this looks like a second coat of enamel was sprayed to soon after the first. The solvents will eat the previous coat untill completely dry.
I'm using Ace lacquer primer + gloss paint, allowing a full week to ensure previous coats are completely dry. I've been advised to sand it down again and make sure that no finger oils taint the surface. Then apply shellac to seal any previous coats, so that a fresh coat of paint won't cause a reaction. Think I'll use straight gloss lacquer this time instead of the combined primer + paint.
 

Ludwigboy

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What is causing the rough spots? There are several layers of primer and paint on this old hoop. Before spraying, I sanded it completely smooth using 400 grit paper followed by steel wool, then wiped it down carefully with a dry cloth. The rough spots appeared immediately upon spraying. Is it a chemical reaction to something from a previous coat? I'm inclined to strip it to bare wood and start all over. Sheesh.
Don't beat up yourself over it.... things like this happen to me all the time! It's a learning process and you are getting good advice above! I applaud you for giving it a try! You know the old saying " If at first you don't succeed.....try, try again".
 

Fat Drummer

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I'm using Ace lacquer primer + gloss paint, allowing a full week to ensure previous coats are completely dry. I've been advised to sand it down again and make sure that no finger oils taint the surface. Then apply shellac to seal any previous coats, so that a fresh coat of paint won't cause a reaction. Think I'll use straight gloss lacquer this time instead of the combined primer + paint.
What kind of paint is it? Not brand but the type of paint it's self?
 

natchomamma

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Laquer primer is your issue. I try to avoid it at all cost. Typically, what happens is it does not fully cure and then you put a coat of paint over it and the finish krinkles because it continue to off gas (cure) Stick with catalyzed primers and urethane automotive paints.

Can you use lacquer paints? Yes, but you run this risk of stuff like this happening. I avoid it at all cost.
 
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