I Think I Want a Rogers Kit

gwbasley

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I've always been a Ludwig guy, but I.m getting old and I don't have that UUMPH!... in my foot anymore. Every time I check into the Vintage section someone is raving about the power of the Rogers bass drums. I once had a Rogers set and loved them. Now i want them again....must be a 60's kit and i am a player not a collector.

Tell me what to look for?...
 

drummertom

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Can't go wrong with a 60's Cleveland or Dayton kit. Player grade can be affordable.
 

jptrickster

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Early 1970 Fullerton era great drums as well(below) most had leftover Dayton shells and parts, still using machined collets.
A lot of guys swear big Big R era mid 70's and Xp8 shells as well. If you choose a 70's Swivo hardware model be aware of the pot metal collets( they were horrible) Not a huge deal though Al Drew makes machined repro's.

027.JPG
061.JPG
 

gkrk

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Very nice early '70s kit there, JP. The previous owner seems to have taken
good care of them :icon_lol:! And your detailing certainly helps!

Jeremy
 

jptrickster

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Ha thanks Jeremy! The previous owner(s) were very kind to these. Its an honor to own/play them and keep the flame alive. Stay warm my friend!
 

rhythmace

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I've always been a Ludwig guy, but I.m getting old and I don't have that UUMPH!... in my foot anymore. Every time I check into the Vintage section someone is raving about the power of the Rogers bass drums. I once had a Rogers set and loved them. Now i want them again....must be a 60's kit and i am a player not a collector.

Tell me what to look for?...
The 20" does have that solid "thump". Ace
 
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Trilock_Gurtu

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I think you should go to a vintage drum shop, put a blind fold on, and play every kit there...buy the one that sounds, and feels best for you, regardless of name/brand.

Cheers.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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I think you should go to a vintage drum shop, put a blind fold on, and play every kit there...buy the one that sounds, and feels best for you, regardless of name/brand.

Cheers.
Well, that would be missing the point of vintage drum acquisition, wouldn't it? The sound of these old drums is only a part (sometimes a really small part) of the quest. A good number of us guys seeking these old, storied drums either played them in the past, or wished we could. Now, at older age, we can fulfill our dreams - and sound has precious little to do with it.

The images of classic Ludwigs, Rogers, and Slingerland kits are literally burned into my memory, the result of literally hundreds of hours of wistfully longing for what I saw in the drum catalogs of the day. Seeing those old kits today reignites a range of emotions long dormant in my mind - from days of youth, impressiveness, longing, wishing, and a desire for the "perfection" that owning a kit like these would certainly fulfill. I saw my heroes playing these kits, for crying out loud. Owning a kit like theirs, in those days and now, would provide some kind of connection, or kinship, with the drummers I longed to be.

Great sound? That's easy to find. Your blindfold test would be perfect if that was the pursuit.

But legacy? The fulfillment of dreams? Sound alone is only a small part of that quest.

GeeDeeEmm
 

aldenyc2012

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I've always been a Ludwig guy, but I.m getting old and I don't have that UUMPH!... in my foot anymore. Every time I check into the Vintage section someone is raving about the power of the Rogers bass drums. I once had a Rogers set and loved them. Now i want them again....must be a 60's kit and i am a player not a collector.

Tell me what to look for?...
dammm My sentiments exactly .. My issue is that of the kits that caught my interest, they only had a 20 BD. I just have this thing about a 22.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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...and whilst the other lads had Playboys hidden neath their beds, young GeeDeeEmm had the motherlode of drum catalogs pilfered from the local music shop...
:)
Ha! That is literally true! Except that I lived deep in the farm country of Arkansas, and a trip to the "big city" was something reserved for the adults. Every single year I would write to Ludwig, Slingerland, and Rogers and ask them for a catalog, which they always obliged. Getting a new drum catalog in the mail was enough to make my heart race - even though many years were a simple re-issue of last year's model. Didn't matter. The old ones were quite ragged from a year's worth of fiddling.

When it came to the girlie magazines, I only had to look under my dad's mattress to find those!

GeeDeeEmm
 

Trilock_Gurtu

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Well, that would be missing the point of vintage drum acquisition, wouldn't it? The sound of these old drums is only a part (sometimes a really small part) of the quest. A good number of us guys seeking these old, storied drums either played them in the past, or wished we could. Now, at older age, we can fulfill our dreams - and sound has precious little to do with it.

The images of classic Ludwigs, Rogers, and Slingerland kits are literally burned into my memory, the result of literally hundreds of hours of wistfully longing for what I saw in the drum catalogs of the day. Seeing those old kits today reignites a range of emotions long dormant in my mind - from days of youth, impressiveness, longing, wishing, and a desire for the "perfection" that owning a kit like these would certainly fulfill. I saw my heroes playing these kits, for crying out loud. Owning a kit like theirs, in those days and now, would provide some kind of connection, or kinship, with the drummers I longed to be.

Great sound? That's easy to find. Your blindfold test would be perfect if that was the pursuit.

But legacy? The fulfillment of dreams? Sound alone is only a small part of that quest.

GeeDeeEmm
"Sound alone is only a small part of that quest". No offense, but that's one of the saddest statements I've ever heard a drummer make.

Not in my opinion. Are you really after a name?...reliving a childhood fantasy?...want to be like Bonham? If that's the case, go for it, buy whatever makes you happy. For me, when I think of Bonham, Roach, Williams, Helm, Jordan, etc, its their sound that impacts me first and foremost.

I play for a living, and SOUND always takes priority. This may surprise some people, but not all 70's 3 ply Ludwig's sound amazing, or Gretsch Roundbadges , or 50's Leedy's, etc. Hopefully I didn't burst some bubbles.

Rarely do I have a final say in what drums (sounds) I use, this is often chosen by; the style of music I'm playing, producers, engineers, artists who hire me, band leaders, etc. Oddly, this has been very freeing, and opened my eyes (ears) to other sounds my own personal biases wouldn't have experienced, otherwise.

"Great sound? That's easy to find". Is it? "Great sound" is subjective. Have ten drummers listen to a kit, and you'll get ten different opinions. Not easy.

This goes back to my original statement. One must play various options to determine what is a "great sound" to THEM.
 

gkrk

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...and whilst the other lads had Playboys hidden neath their beds, young GeeDeeEmm had the motherlode of drum catalogs pilfered from the local music shop...
:)
Those catalogs weren't likely "pilfered" back then. You'd just walk in and the catalogs were there for the taking. Or you'd simply sent a kid-scrawled letter (or some little coupon cut out of Boys' Life or whatever) to the manufacturer and they'd send you a 100+ page catalog for FREE! And then you were hooked, really hooked. 1960s to at least early '70s just about any company of any sort would send you stuff for free, and in a lot of cases they'd just keep sending you updated stuff. Really and truly. It worked for me back then. Estes Model Rockets, Edmund Scientific, Lafayette Electronics, Allied Electronics, Radio Shack, Olson Electronics.... I bet stuff still goes to my old hometown street address in my name decades after my parents sold that house.

Jeremy
 


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