I Think I Want a Rogers Kit

gwbasley

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What if you "get a Rogers" set and your foot still has no ooomph..

Have you explored all possibilities with the bass drum you have now; wooden beater, different heads, etc different pedals etc "Big felt beater" ...
52
 

lcondo123

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I'm selling a Cleveland era Beavertail lug kit. It's a Top Hat model, which is the precursor to the Londoner set up. 12/12/16/20 in silver glass glitter. I also have a matching wood Powertone snare I can include in the sale. It's an excellent player's kit. If you'd be interested feel free to reach out!

Luke
 

tommykat1

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Pretty much set on 20, 12, 13, 16 ... I think it's called their "Londoner" kit. That would be almost identical to my Ludwig set, except for my 15"FT.
Yes, Londoner. Mine is 22-12-13-16, which was my preference when searching for the set.
 

slingerland 59 R/K snare

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I've always been a Ludwig guy, but I.m getting old and I don't have that UUMPH!... in my foot anymore. Every time I check into the Vintage section someone is raving about the power of the Rogers bass drums. I once had a Rogers set and loved them. Now i want them again....must be a 60's kit and i am a player not a collector.

Tell me what to look for?...
Gwbasley: These fine kits have always been the top of the list for me. But never hook up on a set. I hope you find what your looking for .Enjoy the rhythm:
 

sptucker

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I've always been a Ludwig guy, but I.m getting old and I don't have that UUMPH!... in my foot anymore. Every time I check into the Vintage section someone is raving about the power of the Rogers bass drums. I once had a Rogers set and loved them. Now i want them again....must be a 60's kit and i am a player not a collector.

Tell me what to look for?...
Hey, I'm getting old too and I totally get your desire to branch out. At a certain point, you realize time is running out and you might as well try some new cans. I chose engineering over music 30+ years ago, and at this point I am fortunate enough to have an understanding spouse and discretionary drumming dollars. In the last year, I have discovered both Gretsch and Rogers, and I have been lucky enough to find phenomenal examples of each.

You don't need to use the "UUMPH" excuse with me. I get it... ;-). If you've got the cash, go for it. The sound is what you make it, as you probably know. I submit that playing a kit in a drum shop does no good unless you bring a drum key and are allowed to experiment for an hour (an unlikely scenario). Unless a drum shell is horribly out of round or has beat up bearing edges, you can make it sound good. SO many variables to tinker with - heads, rims, tuning, blah blah blah.

Folks here have given you good advice (as usual). Since you specified 60s Rogers drums, look for Cleveland or Dayton shells with clean wrap and solid bearing edges, beavertail lugs and machined collets. Swivomatic hardware is da bomb. It can be finicky when adjusting due to years of wear, but you will learn tricks to make it easier. My kit is a '68 Dayton 12/13/16/22 and the hardware sparkles like new and is rock solid. I am super impressed with the quality. It's definitely a cut above my '60s Ludwigs.

Good luck with your quest. Remember that somebody will buy your Rogers drums if they wind up not being your cup of tea.
 

james_c_marks

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That's a 28", right?
How's that going?
A 28" is an interesting beast. The ROGERS 10" x 28" is a dream come true. It's so light and easy to move around, and so easy to get into even a back seat because it's shallow.

At my band's rehearsal space we have 2 other kits, one 22" and one 24". The 22" is nice and clicky, the 24" is deeper and still punchy...

The 28" is just a deep boom that you can hear & feel even when it's not mic'd. It's fundamental seems to exist below everything else so you hear it without effort.

When the batter head gets a little too loose, you can feel the differences in where the beater seems to hit the head, and that can be difficult in the 4th hour of a gig when your foot gets fatigued.

I'm still enjoying it. From out front the bass drum sounds great. I had a few people say "that kit sounds like Cozy Powell" at the last gig -- that's a good thing right?
 

EvEnStEvEn

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Don't discount the Big-R era kits in your search!
They're truly fantastic drums and still easily found in the used marketplace, many are surprisingly underpriced, IMO. I've been completely satisfied with my 1980 Londoner outfit every time I sit down to play them.

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D. B. Cooper

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A 28" is an interesting beast. The ROGERS 10" x 28" is a dream come true. It's so light and easy to move around, and so easy to get into even a back seat because it's shallow.

At my band's rehearsal space we have 2 other kits, one 22" and one 24". The 22" is nice and clicky, the 24" is deeper and still punchy...

The 28" is just a deep boom that you can hear & feel even when it's not mic'd. It's fundamental seems to exist below everything else so you hear it without effort.

When the batter head gets a little too loose, you can feel the differences in where the beater seems to hit the head, and that can be difficult in the 4th hour of a gig when your foot gets fatigued.

I'm still enjoying it. From out front the bass drum sounds great. I had a few people say "that kit sounds like Cozy Powell" at the last gig -- that's a good thing right?
Awesome, man.
I played a 70's 8x28 for a while and I loved it. Maybe I'll get some new heads for it and set up again. Thanks for the inspiration!
 

viaduck

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Remove the drumhead from your Ludwig bass drum. Place your head inside. Breathe deeply 3 times and enjoy the vintage Ludwig scent. Replace the drumhead. Run your fingertips over a classic lug and admire the beauty of it. This should stop these crazy thoughts.
 

shuffle

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gw,I've even pieced 3 kits of Rogers with all 3 eras,Cleveland, Dayton,Fullerton in one kit ay a time.
The word i use with these situations is Consistent.
The eras are all great and play great all together.
 

Tama CW

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Don't discount the Big-R era kits in your search!
They're truly fantastic drums and still easily found in the used marketplace, many are surprisingly underpriced, IMO. I've been completely satisfied with my 1980 Londoner outfit every time I sit down to play them.
I fully agree. Big R's give the same Rogers sound at far less cost. And the Big R hardware and mounts are more rugged than the earlier versions. I have a 1977 Big R and I'm always blown away when I sit down to play it. It can give a classic 60's vibe on thin heads tuned tighter or a rugged 80's rock sound on 2 ply heads. Probably one of the best vintage buys out there. 5 ply with re-rings - just like the earlier Fullertons. And those kick drum legs and memri-locs grow on you. I like them.
 

funkypoodle

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Don't discount the Big-R era kits in your search!
They're truly fantastic drums and still easily found in the used marketplace, many are surprisingly underpriced, IMO. I've been completely satisfied with my 1980 Londoner outfit every time I sit down to play them.

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View attachment 399860
I fully agree. Big R's give the same Rogers sound at far less cost. And the Big R hardware and mounts are more rugged than the earlier versions. I have a 1977 Big R and I'm always blown away when I sit down to play it. It can give a classic 60's vibe on thin heads tuned tighter or a rugged 80's rock sound on 2 ply heads. Probably one of the best vintage buys out there. 5 ply with re-rings - just like the earlier Fullertons. And those kick drum legs and memri-locs grow on you. I like them.
2 years ago I had a slow patch & was left with no plan B for rent. In last minute desperation I sold off a nice 9/72 NEW Londoner 5, paid my rent, took the difference and drove like a maniac to Montreal to pick up a '77 Big R for dirt cheap. It was a crap shoot, but I ended up with a good solid set of drums & ended up doing tons of gigs and recordings with them. I let them go on Tuesday because the drum gods have been kind to me of late & there's no more room in the inn. May they be as trustworthy and full of tone for their new owner!
 
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