Iconic standard reference point for maple shell drums.

hector48

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When it comes to birch drum shells, it seems most people agree that the Yamaha Recording Custom sets the standard.
But what about maple shells? Is there a standard to which most other maple drums are compared?
I'm not talking about which one sounds best to you, but what brand and model comes to mind when you think maple drums?
Not vintage, but within the last 30 years or so.
To me, it would most likely be Pearl Masters, Tama Starclassic Maple, or Ludwig. Maybe even DW Collectors.
Or perhaps there isn't one model that is the golden child.
Thoughts?
 

VintageUSA

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The Old Testament reflects the answer to be Gretsch USA (even though the old Jaspers contained layers of gum wood).
The New Testament authors can't decide (all subsequent multi-ply maple shells were arguably a derivative of the USA Jasper shell).
 

Mcjnic

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I always thought it was the Yamaha Maple Custom.
In my circles, that has been the standard.
 

Tornado

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The Old Testament reflects the answer to be Gretsch USA (even though the old Jaspers contained layers of gum wood).
The New Testament authors can't decide (all subsequent multi-ply maple shells were arguably a derivative of the USA Jasper shell).
Later rejected texts teach that physical drums are inherently evil, and digital sample replacement with software like Superior Drummer is the true path.
 

Mongrel

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Every Tama guy knows the answer is Tama...
Every Yamaha guy knows the answer is Yamaha...
Every Gretsch guy knows the answer is Gretsch...
Every Rogers guy knows the answer is.....

(continue until you run out of brand names)

Why do I say that? Because I believe, and have read testimony from 'others' a lot smarter than me, that Tama shells are every bit as good as Yamaha shells-birch or maple, and I would put a Tama birch or maple kit up against any Yamaha kit with "confidence" that the Yamaha kit has no special mojo over them.

And since it's all objective opinion anyways....we would all be "right".

;)
 

AaronLatos

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It's somewhat of a non-answer, but I don't think I've been in a studio in the NYC metro area that doesn't have at least one maple Keller-shelled set. It might be Modern Drum Shop, Precision, GMS, late Slingerland, or any number of other smaller builders, but there's always at least one, and the engineers often really like it.

Oh wait... I don't think Dreamland has one, but Jerry Marotta (yes, that Jerry, who's also the owner) is a Yamaha guy and he's got an amazing selection of Yamaha.

In the circles I run in, I see Yamaha Maple Customs as the runner-up standard maple backline kit for studio, and live if it's jazz. DW Collectors are slightly more common as live backline for other styles (rock/funk/country/hip-hop).
 

Tornado

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Maybe another twist on this (perhaps more accurate), what recording is the iconic reference point of what we all think maple drums should sound like?
 

Mongrel

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Maybe another twist on this (perhaps more accurate), what recording is the iconic reference point of what we all think maple drums should sound like?
Hmmmm....maybe-

"A Day in The Life"...

Those big, fat, warm, Ludwig toms singing out in the hall of reverb....
 

Mcjnic

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Maybe another twist on this (perhaps more accurate), what recording is the iconic reference point of what we all think maple drums should sound like?
That’s what I was replying to.
The sound.
Like the Recording Custom sound is the standard ... the Maple Custom set the standard for sound.
Live was it’s bread and butter, for sure.
Times change, I guess.
I have to agree with Aaron ... that DW has become ubiquitous.
I’m not sure I’d go so far as to say the DW “sound” is the standard.
It’s definitely offered up with abandon ... perhaps due to the support? Not sure.
I don’t have a dog in this fight as I no longer own either a Recording Custom or a Maple Custom.
I’ve drifted off into the lower booooommmm world of drum sounds.
 

K.O.

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Rogers XP8s were the first all maple shells to be aggressively marketed as such. Not sure if they were the first all maple shell or not but they were definitely the first to call attention to that fact in a big way. Prior to that ad campaign not too many drummers paid much attention to what kind of wood was in their drums. The XP8 series seems to be ground zero for the cult of maple.

Rogers only lasted a few more years after that so the XP8 series was relatively short lived and I'm not sure if they could rightly be considered the "iconic" maple drum but they certainly set the stage for whatever drum that might be.
 

m_anderson

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Who had the first all maple shell? Keller I'd assume?
That's a really good question. I would not think Keller since they have only been around 50-60 years. What was Leedy, Ludwig and Slingerland using in the early 1900's?
 

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