ICYMI: Five Isolated Tracks Proving Neil Peart's Genius

Vistalite Black

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Visitalite Black posted this last week within a thread that was a tribute to the Professor (RIP), but that probably wasn't enough.

It was also pointed out that a VB self-reference really irked some posters, so that's kicked off a trend. Anyway, Vista really enjoyed listening to Neil Peart's performances of YYZ, Spirit of Radio, 2112, La Villa Strangiato and Tom Sawyer posted by Far Our magazine. Hope they're Canadian. The only thing that would make these tracks better would be listening to them while eating a huge plate of poutine with a couple of 341 ml Molson XXX on a snowmobile.

Here's the start of the article:

If one band could stake a claim to be comprised of the most gifted musicians in rock music then Rush would be that band. Not only did they have the mercurial wizard of bass in Geddy Lee, nor the axeman Alex Lifeson, but they also had ‘The Professor’ himself, Neil Peart. Today we celebrate the legendary percussionist by bringing you five isolated drum tracks that prove he’s a genius.

Sadly gone too soon, passing away a year ago today, Peart was famed for being the powerhouse creative drive behind much of Rush’s prog-rock glory. The drummer became synonymous with expert musicianship and meticulous artistry. In the myriad of sonics that often accompanies Rush’s songs, there is no better way to see this skill than in these stunning isolated drum tracks from some of the band’s biggest songs including ‘Tom Sawyer’, ‘2112’ and ‘YYZ’.


Peart’s contribution to music is undeniable. Not only was he a creative songwriter but his precision when drumming showed off to a whole generation why sitting behind the kit wasn’t all Bonham-style power and Moon-style animalism. It was something that could be measured and profound at the same time.

After Peart passed away, Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl led tributes saying: “An inspiration to millions with an unmistakable sound who spawned generations of musicians (like myself) to pick up two sticks and chase a dream. A kind, thoughtful, brilliant man who ruled our radios and turntables not only with his drumming but also his beautiful words.

“I still vividly remember my first listen of ‘2112′ when I was young,” Grohl added. “It was the first time I really listened to a drummer. And since that day, music has never been the same. His power, precision, and composition was incomparable. He was called ‘The Professor’ for a reason: we all learned from him.” He was then asked what he would say if he was offered the chance to take Peart’s place for a show, to which he replied: “I’d say ‘I’m not physically or musically capable, but thanks for the offer.’ Neil Peart, that’s a whole other animal, another species of drummer.”


It is that species of drummer which can be heard in the tracks below as we dive into five isolated drum tracks which hands down prove Peart’s genius.


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5 isolated drum tracks to prove that Rush hero Neil Peart was a genius


 

nmosko

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Amazing stuff. If I’m honest, which I try to be, I’ll tell you that I was never into the specifics on NP until after he died. Of course I was aware of him and knew he was a genius and a huge influence on millions. For me he was just a prog drummer and that was about it.

it’s really interesting to be a 20 year player and to just now be really diving into NP stuff.
 

langmick

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You could say Rush was Neil's business and his concept. He did write all the lyrics, which created the albums and album art and liner notes, an d visuals for the production and so on. He was called The Professor because he had an intellect that propelled the band as much as his drumming.

When people ask if it's Bonzo or Neil, I include all of the other things he did, besides playing insanely hard drums for over two thousand shows. But, people just go WELL YEAH BUT WHOS BETTER MAN.
 

Houndog

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You could say Rush was Neil's business and his concept. He did write all the lyrics, which created the albums and album art and liner notes, an d visuals for the production and so on. He was called The Professor because he had an intellect that propelled the band as much as his drumming.

When people ask if it's Bonzo or Neil, I include all of the other things he did, besides playing insanely hard drums for over two thousand shows. But, people just go WELL YEAH BUT WHOS BETTER MAN.
He was actually called The Professor due to Gilligans Island ...
 

esooy

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My takeaway from those isolated tracks, aside from the usual fawning over his genius, was how busy he often plays. By that I mean he plays busy little undercurrents with his bass drum and ghost notes that escape me when listening to the completed tracks.
 

spaeth

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There is a quote from him in one documentary on the band “less isn’t usually more, less is just less”... or something very similar.
 

Deafmoon

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IMHO, the quintessential Rush track displaying Neil's genius was Xanadu. Neils use pf percussion in opening the 'opium induced dream' Coleridge had after reading of Mongol King Kubla Khan's summer place Xanadu; was perfect. Not only did Neil encapsulate the dream-like feelings with Orchestra Bells, Wood Blocks & Wind Chimes, but he brought his interpretation out of Alex and Ged to exactly what this dream should depict. This is Rush's Magnum Opus .
 

DavedrumsTX

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Visitalite Black posted this last week within a thread that was a tribute to the Professor (RIP), but that probably wasn't enough.

It was also pointed out that a VB self-reference really irked some posters, so that's kicked off a trend. Anyway, Vista really enjoyed listening to Neil Peart's performances of YYZ, Spirit of Radio, 2112, La Villa Strangiato and Tom Sawyer posted by Far Our magazine. Hope they're Canadian. The only thing that would make these tracks better would be listening to them while eating a huge plate of poutine with a couple of 341 ml Molson XXX on a snowmobile.

Here's the start of the article:

If one band could stake a claim to be comprised of the most gifted musicians in rock music then Rush would be that band. Not only did they have the mercurial wizard of bass in Geddy Lee, nor the axeman Alex Lifeson, but they also had ‘The Professor’ himself, Neil Peart. Today we celebrate the legendary percussionist by bringing you five isolated drum tracks that prove he’s a genius.

Sadly gone too soon, passing away a year ago today, Peart was famed for being the powerhouse creative drive behind much of Rush’s prog-rock glory. The drummer became synonymous with expert musicianship and meticulous artistry. In the myriad of sonics that often accompanies Rush’s songs, there is no better way to see this skill than in these stunning isolated drum tracks from some of the band’s biggest songs including ‘Tom Sawyer’, ‘2112’ and ‘YYZ’.


Peart’s contribution to music is undeniable. Not only was he a creative songwriter but his precision when drumming showed off to a whole generation why sitting behind the kit wasn’t all Bonham-style power and Moon-style animalism. It was something that could be measured and profound at the same time.

After Peart passed away, Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl led tributes saying: “An inspiration to millions with an unmistakable sound who spawned generations of musicians (like myself) to pick up two sticks and chase a dream. A kind, thoughtful, brilliant man who ruled our radios and turntables not only with his drumming but also his beautiful words.

“I still vividly remember my first listen of ‘2112′ when I was young,” Grohl added. “It was the first time I really listened to a drummer. And since that day, music has never been the same. His power, precision, and composition was incomparable. He was called ‘The Professor’ for a reason: we all learned from him.” He was then asked what he would say if he was offered the chance to take Peart’s place for a show, to which he replied: “I’d say ‘I’m not physically or musically capable, but thanks for the offer.’ Neil Peart, that’s a whole other animal, another species of drummer.”


It is that species of drummer which can be heard in the tracks below as we dive into five isolated drum tracks which hands down prove Peart’s genius.


.

5 isolated drum tracks to prove that Rush hero Neil Peart was a genius


I never call out any one drummer as the greatest as I believe there are so many unique drummers who have made such a great impact on the art of drumming. With that said, I prefer to say who are the most influential drummers of the modern era? Neil is clearly in the top 5 and his work is definitely genius.

My top most influential drummers in chronological order of their influence on me are:

Ringo
Buddy Rich
Ian Paice
John Bonham
Neil Peart
Carl Palmer
Louie Bellson
Steve Gadd
Danny Seraphine
Jeff Porcarro
Stewart Copeland
Kenny Aronoff
Charlie Watts
Simon Phillips
Zigaboo Modeliste
Levon Helm
Richie Hayward
 


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