Impact of snare depth

TheArchitect

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Is pitch/bottom end the only real difference attributed to the depth of a snare drum? I am looking to add an option to the snare locker. Probably a steel shell drum. Looking at the Mapex MPX hammered steel, the tama nickel plated steel and the plain yamaha steel shell. I have the basic 5.5" Maple, an Acrolite and a 13x3 piccolo snare. I am considering the option of this next drum being a 6.5" deep drum. I tend to like a high pitch crack, and I think a little extra depth might warm that up a bit? What's your take on this?
 

dwdave

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deeper seems to give it more depth in tone, longer initial note, can be tuned high and still have some body where a pic ends up sounding like a gnat fart.
 

spazapproved

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my absolute favorite snare right now is a 13x7

One crazy crack yet super nice depth and tone.
You should look into the Pork Pie brass patina or the Tama SLP G-maple.
 

bongomania

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I would separate "pitch" from "bottom end". Pitch is mainly diameter and tuning, but of course drums put out a complex inharmonic sound, so "bottom end" is like how much of the lower end of that inharmonic spectrum is audible in the overall timbre. It's not that the pitches changed, but that moving more air in a bigger chamber amplified the lower frequencies more.
 

Paradiddle

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The fattest snare I have and had every owned (and I've owned or still own all the "must own" snares) is my 5x14 20's NOB.
 

& You Dont Stop

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My feeling is that with deeper snare drums you have more shell to contribute to the character of the drum's sound. 6.5 to 7" drums may be the perfect depth.
 

Freewill3

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Hello TheArchitect! Can't speak for the Mapex but I previously owned the 6.5" Tama Metalworks (which is identical to the Nickel Plated Steel - just a different name) and currently own the 6.5" Yamaha Steel. Both are 1.2mm thick steel shell, both are center beaded but the Yamaha is a concave bead, the Tama is convex. Here's the differences - The Tama is an 8 lug with die cast hoops, the Yamaha is 10 lug with triple flanged hoops. The Tama comes with a stock Evans Black Chrome batter and clear Evans reso, the Yamaha came with "Yamaha" logo heads, not sure who makes them but they were replaced with an Evans Genera HD batter and 300 reso. Both have simple throw offs that compliment each snare well but the Tama is more sturdy and cosmetically pleasing to me.
The Yamaha is a livelier drum to my ears, the Evans heads really warmed up and rounded out the sound. Unfortunately, I never got around to experimenting with the Tama. There's plenty of options with different heads and snare wires that you will be able to find the sound your looking for. Always been a fan of the versatility of the 6.5, good luck!
 

bongomania

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Paradiddle said:
The fattest snare I have and had every owned (and I've owned or still own all the "must own" snares) is my 5x14 20's NOB.
Certainly, and that again brings up how things like "warm", "fat", and "bottom end" mean completely different things to different people.

Also since OP was asking about a cheap steel snare I doubt he's going to buy a 1920's NOB.
 

swarfrat

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Someone say "inexpensive steel snare, likes bite, but wants more body?" This is most likely my next purchase.


Based on my limited experience and searching, I'm not sure depth so much "mellows" the bite as much as it provides body to the note. Bite is mostly direct radiating, and despite all the effort we all put into selection of shell/hoops/etc... to my ears appears to come mostly from the head.

As others have said or implied - the tone generator is the head. A deep body is basically EQ/resonance/modifier on the tone generator.
 
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TheArchitect

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bongomania said:
The fattest snare I have and had every owned (and I've owned or still own all the "must own" snares) is my 5x14 20's NOB.
Certainly, and that again brings up how things like "warm", "fat", and "bottom end" mean completely different things to different people.

Also since OP was asking about a cheap steel snare I doubt he's going to buy a 1920's NOB.
true.. it's not likely.. :)
 

Alan_

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I dunno...I found a 20's NOB Leedy shell fitted with modern strainer and rims for 185USD. Probably a once-in-a-lifetime find, at least in a store...all of the charm of a vintage drum with hardware that actually works well....

Anyway, it's a great sounding drum, but not as "thick" as a deeper drum sounds to my ears. Drum shop has a 7X14 DW NOB shelled drum for 250USD used that I'm eyeing jealously at the moment. It's gorgeous, and sounds really nice.
 

supershifter2

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dwdave said:
deeper seems to give it more depth in tone, longer initial note, can be tuned high and still have some body where a pic ends up sounding like a gnat fart.
i had gas once

 
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Redbeard77

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& You Dont Stop said:
My feeling is that with deeper snare drums you have more shell to contribute to the character of the drum's sound. 6.5 to 7" drums may be the perfect depth.
I agree. With the deeper drum, the shell is able to contribute more to the sound simply because there's more material there to activate.

Having said that, I think heads/tuning play the largest role in the sound, so you can make a smaller drum sound big and vice versa. It's always nice to have a variety of sizes and shell materials, but don't be afraid to experiment with what you've got; you can probably cover a lot of bases already.
 

Paradiddle

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TheArchitect said:
The fattest snare I have and had every owned (and I've owned or still own all the "must own" snares) is my 5x14 20's NOB.
Certainly, and that again brings up how things like "warm", "fat", and "bottom end" mean completely different things to different people.

Also since OP was asking about a cheap steel snare I doubt he's going to buy a 1920's NOB.
true.. it's not likely.. :)




You should. They are going for dirt now - you can find nice 8 lug examples for 600-700. They were 1K+ a couple years ago.

8 lug, 5x14, 2 piece NOB shell. You will thank me later.

:)
 

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