In praise of the Acrolite

CC Cirillo

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I was once in a band that was a cross between Johnny Cash and QOTSA. I hit pretty hard - like, rimshots-all-night 5B stick-splintering levels - and I did find my 5" Acro with stock hoops would be prone to choking.

My fix was to cut a 1.5" hole in the snare-side head, about an inch in from the edge, perpendicular to the snare wires. It just opened up the drum again and gave it some extra headroom. Sensitivity and tone were unaffected.

That is all.

853guy

A ported snare side. Oh, this is probably going to be a thing at some point.

But you do bring up a good point about the Acro, in that—to my ear—they are not a particular cutting drum.

That’s why I love mine, the way it’s so well behaved.

When the stage volume ramps up like my in laws discussing the politics of the Middle East at Thanksgiving, then it’s a Supra, or Black Beauty (if arak is involved).
 

853guy

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... you do bring up a good point about the Acro, in that—to my ear—they are not a particular cutting drum.

That’s why I love mine, the way it’s so well behaved.

When the stage volume ramps up like my in laws discussing the politics of the Middle East at Thanksgiving, then it’s a Supra, or Black Beauty (if arak is involved).
Yeah, I kinda look at it like this:

Acro for characterful articulation.

BB for versatile elegance.

COB for thunky projection.

The Supra falls in between stools for me. I totally get why others love it, but the three above more than cover 99% of musical situations for me.

A ported snare side. Oh, this is probably going to be a thing at some point.
If it is, I'm sure John Good will either try to patent it, or failing that, give it a three letter acronym, and then trademark it.

I should add that for snare drums, my default is to tune the batter head for response and tone, and the snare-side for articulation.

Given the sound of the bottom head is an interdependent relationship between the pitch of the head and both the tension and width of the snare wires, porting it (albeit, with a very small hole) makes very little difference to the overall sound of the snare (since pitch and snare wire width/tension are unaffected), but does make a difference in terms of how the snare responds to dynamics before choking.

The Acro is the only snare I have ever done this to, so I cannot say how effective or not it will be for other snares. It just worked for that particular snare in that particular band with those particular sticks.

Best,

853guy
 
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pedro navahas

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Played on that house kit again last night and got a good look at the Acrolite.
Coated emperor on top (well used) with ambassador snare side.
As it is set up right now this drum is a one trick pony!
Unless your laying down a solid backbeat it sounds terrible, no sensitivity whatsoever. I would really like to mess with it and see if I can get that same backbeat with a different head for more versatility but as for now I’ll just use it as is.
 

jptrickster

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I've yet to covet the elusive 10n lug 5x14. If you ever need to raise $ quickly Mike send me a note!
 

mlayton

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I had two of the B/O models like I posted. I did sell one of those to a close friend as he didn't have one. I still have the other three. According to my records I have 23 different acros (different styles/features). This includes three different first generation (proto) models and two 6.5 models...keystone and blue olive. My most favorite recent acquisition was the blue olive cut badge acrolite that had the hole for an original bat muffler instead of a round knob muffler. Took me nearly 20 years to find it. Sorry for the dark pic.
My cut badge Acrolite.jpeg
 


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