Is The 22/16/13 Configuration Too Big?

dogmanaut

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If the extra inch on the 13 is the issue, not the 22” bass drum itself, you can always just go with a 12x8 rack tom (cheaper than replacing the whole kit), or there are vintage kits with 13x8 toms as the standard size (i.e. Sonor).
 

felis

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22/13/16 is one of the standard sizes and probably used to be the most common.
Smaller mounted tom sizes of 10 and 12 are more common now.
And judging by forum postings, it seems like most all sizes of bass drums have their fans.
The right size set for someone depends on a lot of factors.
I like a 5 pc. set with 20/10/12/14 sizes, but YMMV.
 

DanRH

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No, not for me. I’m not a small bass drum guy at all. I have 20” Rogers that I occasionally use, which sounds great, but looks puny to me. For me 22/13/16 is the perfect set up. Last night I used my 24/13/16. For me, it was heaven.

Heaven
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Stixnergard2

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If the extra inch on the 13 is the issue, not the 22” bass drum itself, you can always just go with a 12x8 rack tom (cheaper than replacing the whole kit), or there are vintage kits with 13x8 toms as the standard size (i.e. Sonor).
+1, I had issues with the Tom height using a 9x13 and swapped it out for the matching 8x12 I have. I play the kit as a 22,12,16, perfect compromise.
 

cribbon

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No, 13/16/22 is NOT too big. To me, those are THE CLASSIC drum sizes.

But, maybe it's too big for YOU. If you're looking ahead to when you're older, and want easy drums to schlepp, then yeah, smaller drums ARE easier to load and set up.

So, maybe you should sell your vintage drums and replace with a 12/14/20 set.....

Also, keep in mind that after months of looking at and playing smaller drums, your 13/16/22 LOOKS huge, but, if you looked at and played only that kit for eight months, it would look and feel "normal."

For myself, I use my 20" kick 99% of the time. The 18 and 22 haven't been out in over a year. When it's a low money, hard load-in gig, or a rehearsal, I just bring less stuff, no toms, just one cymbal....I don't like 16" bass drums at all....

Good luck.
That's what I did a few years back when I did a "down-the-road-and-into-the-sunset" assessment of my sunset years. I started playing on a 22k/13,16f (a used Ludwig Super Classic) and then moved on to the 70s multi-tom thing in various configurations/combinations but always with a 22 kick. Around 2005 I did a serious rethink and revision and moved to a 20k/10,12,14 combination which I mainly use as a 4-piece. Although I don't think their onstage footprint is any small than a 22k/13,16f, they do take up less room in the car. I did second guess myself a couple of years ago and also got a 22 & 16 floor tom just in case, but I can count on one hand the number of times I've used those two drums since I got them.

If you have the right heads and tuning (and mics if/when necessary) a 4-banger with a 20 kick will do pretty much do whatever you need to do under what I consider normal circumstances - when it gets smaller than that, I ditch the floor tom; when it gets bigger than that, I just mic 'em up.

For my tiny gigs/rehearsals, I leave the floor tom & crash cymbal at home & go 3-piece with the single rack tom & ride cymbal on the bass drum. I still have some other sets and a bunch of odds & ends, but I could easily survive with just the 20/10,12,14.



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cribbon

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My main reason for not using a 13” is they are usually 9

if you are comfortable playing this way, don’t port the head on the 20” I read that the port has an affect on bottom end. On my 20” I have a full head with 3 small holes on each side to let air release. It’s got a good punch and a good bottom end. View attachment 406816
I have no problems with porting mine - this is my favorite bass drum of all time.

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Old Drummer

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I played a 20" bass drum for most of my career (actually I played two of them briefly back when double bass drums were fashionable) but never liked the sound I got out of that size and always wanted a 22". Finally in my do-over elder years I have a 22" bass drum and swear it is a lot better sounding than the 20". I just think 22" is the right size for a bass drum, and while smaller or larger will work, 22" is to go-to size for everything (including acoustic jazz).

Early on I also played a 14" floor tom (matching my 20" bass drum) but never really liked that either. I swapped that out fairly quickly for a 16", which I think is the right size for a floor tom. Like a 20" bass drum, you can get by with a 14" floor tom, but imho 22" and 16" are the go-to sizes (again for everything).

However, having also owned and played a 13" rack tom, I can't say that's the best size to go with a 22/16 combination (unless it's for some rock styles). I think you want a 12" to go with your 22" and 16", although a 13" that matches may be close enough to work with. In the alternative, you can use the 13" and add a 10" or something to give you a higher pitch option.

I will add that the 2 extra inches on a 22" bass drum does noticeably raise the set. I don't think 2 inches makes much difference to the footprint or for hauling, but it does have a different player's feel. Depending on how big you are, this could be an issue. But it's only 2 inches and 20" bass drums feel puny to me.
 

CC Cirillo

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Played that configuration for years and came to the following conclusion:
22/16/13 is definitely not too big, but it’s too big for me.
 

the_dude

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Fair enough. I tend to like my drums lower and my body slightly elevated above the drums. That means the toms need to be a bit lower than I can get with a 13” drum. By the way, I’m the same height as you.
Yep. Varies by person.
 

squidart

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I feel your pain. I almost got rid of my Super Classic set out of frustration with the 13 position as I’m not a person of great height! But after a ton of mount wrangling I finally got it to a confy position. It looks odd but works for me.
And besides, how are you going to punctuate Take Five with a 20 or an 18? :)
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Jazzhead

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If we are talking the classic size 22”x14” I am starting to think the difference is not significant compared to a 20”, 18” is a different story since it is not as versatile as a 22.
If I can find a matching 12” it will be way better as I think the 12” will offer better positioning and will be good for jazzier stuff too.
22/16/12 will keep me from swapping my kit with a 20/16/12 or 20/14/12.
This is a kit I bought with my own money in my 20s so letting it go would make me sad.
 

trommel

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20, 13, 16 1965
22, 10, 12, 16 2016
26, 13, 16, 18 2008
Hardware from 1965, 2007 & 2008
24 cymbals from 1965 to 2016

Take your pick, have at it. I'm 68 years old. Do what you need to do.
It ain't nothing but a thing!
 

D. B. Cooper

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Wow. It must be relative. The 22” bass drum feels right, if not just a hair small, for me. 13, 16, 22 is my favorite, but I’m going to get a custom 8x12, 14x15, 12x22 kit. Nervous about the small sizes!
Nice man. What are you getting?
 

Drummer1990

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22,13,16 is what I’ve played for 19 years... Too big?? Hell no I play a 4 pc setup and then use x2 19crashes,14hihat,22ride

Perfect setup for a rock band where you don’t need a huge setup
 

Itchyvinyl

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The question is...”Too big for what?”

I have 4 kits.
Two are 20/12/15
Two are 22/13/16

I’ve been using a 22/13/16 for my main band. But after hearing recordings from our last gig, I thought the toms and kick were acting a little too slow and mushy for our peppy staccato style of rock.
Going forward, I put some clear heads on one of the 20/12/15 kits and I’m going to see if that’s more appropriate.

Side note: The older I get, the 22” kick in a hard case is too freakin big to carry! haha
 

CherryClassic

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I have an old late 80's large kit with a 22" bass, I converted the 18" tom to bass. After the conversion the 18 saw 90% of my gigs with a good number of configurations depending on my mood. I now have a new kit with 10, 12, 16 with a 20" bass. I'm enjoying that 14x20" so much it is now getting most of my gigs.

sherm
 

Jazz Drummer

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I am a Jazz player, been around for a while and I do know that "problem": I have played 22x12/12x8/16x16 for 30 years, vintage Ludwig and Slingerland RadioKing. Years ago I got my first Ludwig Downbeat (20/12/14) and at first I thought, that's a small floor tom, I hope I don't miss it too often. Then I got used to it and now I mostly play 18 or 20BD with 12 and 14 toms. I still have one 1970 ASBA 13/16/22 which is a beautiful set, tuned high, great for Jazz. But when I play it, it feels quite different, still comfortable though. The fact from my view is, whatever you are used to is best and if you change, it takes time to get used to it. One thing I can say, the shorter the bass drum, the less problems to transport or to find space on a small stage (I have not experienced hight restrictions) for that reason I like 12" deep BDs. Also, short BDs give a very nice punch, heads are just closer together and that does make a difference. My road set is a 1970s Premier 18x12/12x8/14x12, sounds great, inside, outside - just anywhere. The 18x12 BD with a closed, unmuffled reso-heard really cuts through, no problems at all.
 
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Peano

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It wasn't for Joe Morello.
Exactly right. When I was in college (mid-1960s) I saw the Brubeck Quartet in concert. Sat on the front row about three feet from the stage. When it was over, I hopped up on stage and asked Morello to autograph my program. He said, "OK, but first you have to pack up these drums." Needless to say I was thrilled. I also played a set of 13-16-22 Ludwigs, so I could break them down in my sleep. I got my autograph.

Bernard Purdy said when he was a young studio musician in NYC, he used a 22" bass. He didn't have a car, so he would carry his drums on city buses (!!) to get to studio sessions. How he managed that I'll never understand.
 
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