Is the ride cymbal dying in modern rock music?

Demonslayer

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I remember growing up and thinking that Alex Van Halen's choice of riding on a crash was odd. Fast-forward 30 years and it's become pretty much the SOP for everything hard rock.

It's been almost 8 years since I've used a bona-fide ride in a rock setting. Band leaders prefer that I bash away on the crash, otherwise it "loses energy".

Thoughts?
 

Drm1979

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Nope not for me. I have used a ride for 20+ years and wouldn't ever think of not having one. I have an old zildjian from the 60s or 70s and wont ever trade it or not use it. It's the one cymbal I've never replaced and it is a signature of my sound.
 

supershifter2

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In the 70's I was ridding on 18" crashes and tip of stickin on my 22" ride. It depends on what the song needs. In live setting many drummers I saw live all the way back to the 70's would ride a ride or crash for stage volume. Most of the time cymbals can barely be heard if at all in a live setting. Alex VH had his own style and rode the edge of a ride. Keith moon didnt use hats live. Most drummers that I have seen live play with open hihats. Many drummers use the butt end of the stick. I have been playing a 20" floor tom since the mid 80's and thats really rare. I have a 22" Paiste 2002 crash I also ride with the tip of stick for a long sustain ride. I have a 24" ride I stick tip for quick short definition notes but I dont take notes cause I'm sometimes under a rest. I bet nobody has a drum or cymbal setup like me. I play rock,hard rock,heavy metal,blues,pop,boogies, etc with this same setup. Make your own sound and be you neek or a geek like Mongo. lol


tama drums overhead 2 numbered.jpg
 

Sinclair

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I kind of agree with that yeah. It's more an energetic wash with the bass drum and snare carrying it. Not much bell articulations either.
 

drumgadget

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I'd say it totally depends on the tune you're trying to cop ...... "rock"covers a lot of ground in my view. I (used to!) play a lot of light pop covers and latin-tinged stuff with my little trio backing vocalist, often in very quiet settings. Just used the same jazz cymbals I always use, perhaps add a fast rideable crash and a pingier ride for the more pop-oriented gigs.

Square eighths or swung eighths ..... who cares? Play to the song ....... and the setting .......


M.
 

jptrickster

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I hear the trend. Riding the bell and pile driving the crash/ride is the new ride. not much in between.
 

osw000

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Lacking any reference band for "modern rock" let's check last three years Grammy nominees under Rock cat. to see of there's any pingy ride line. I'm afraid that all will be very washy-bashy with few to none bells.
 

bassanddrum84

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I wouldn’t say it’s gone. I would say it’s more wash riding then ping.
 


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