Is the ride cymbal dying in modern rock music?

Biggsenator

Active Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2021
Messages
31
Reaction score
15
Location
Norman, Oklahoma
All you have to do to know this isn’t true is pay attention. Sure there’s a lot of amateurs who cover up sloppiness with a lot of noise. This is not the case in any professional band that I’ve ever heard. It’s a style. It’s a sound. It is what it is. But sloppy it is not, at least in any functional music made with intent.
Hmmm. Intelligent reply. Guess I was just emoting, since I [generally] don't care for the style. Thanks for the admonishment.
 

TonyVazquez

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
235
Reaction score
230
Location
Cohoes, NY
I still play a Ride cymbal... size and type depends on the venue.
My current drum setup uses an old Camber silver 18" Crash-Ride which I play anywhere.
It's loud under nylon drum stick tips, its bell pings nicely, and crashes fast.

But for smaller venues such as a coffee shop, street corner, or a record store
in which I just play a kick and snare drum, I use the bottom hi-hat cymbal
as a "ride" and a "crash", and its bell pings nicely.

The Paiste 2002 Ride has always been my favorite rock ride,
and I plan to go back to using a Ride cymbal of that size.
 

Monday317

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
90
Reaction score
62
Location
Western PA
I remember growing up and thinking that Alex Van Halen's choice of riding on a crash was odd. Fast-forward 30 years and it's become pretty much the SOP for everything hard rock.

It's been almost 8 years since I've used a bona-fide ride in a rock setting. Band leaders prefer that I bash away on the crash, otherwise it "loses energy".

Thoughts?
Who cares what modern rockers do? They are simply bashers who make noise. I couldn’t give a rat’s patoot about what these jokers do with their kits. Ignore them and enjoy your ride. If you need more “energy”, you need a different ride or a few rivets. It’s just that cymple...
 

carl1969

Very well Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2005
Messages
1,375
Reaction score
41
The key word is "modern", If you listen to OCTANE on XM (we'll consider that modern) there's not a lot of riding on a ride cymbal going on. ( my wife likes that station, I'm more of a classic rock guy) I'm 51, I play in an 80's band covering mainly VH to GnR to Poison so I rely on a ride. I can't really see not using a ride personally, maybe a light ride if you want to crash on it (dual purpose) or just use a multi or medium cymbal, I just bought my 1st 24" ride (2002) and can't wait to gig with it. Anyone who was a copeland fan would cringe at not having a bell to play. I also play blues. Now if you check out some of the cooler hard rock bands like Rival Sons there's definitely a ride cymbal happening. It's really hard to tell anymore.
 

DJ ATL Drums

New Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
I play in an 80's cover band, and did notice that I hardly use the ride at all. Maybe on 5 or 6 out of 30+ songs. Seems strange because a ride was the first and only cymbal my teacher would allow me to have in the beginning. Was the foundation of how I learned to play the kit. Maybe that is a link back to jazz?
 

cruddola

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
428
Reaction score
356
Location
usa
In the 70's I was ridding on 18" crashes and tip of stickin on my 22" ride. It depends on what the song needs. In live setting many drummers I saw live all the way back to the 70's would ride a ride or crash for stage volume. Most of the time cymbals can barely be heard if at all in a live setting. Alex VH had his own style and rode the edge of a ride. Keith moon didnt use hats live. Most drummers that I have seen live play with open hihats. Many drummers use the butt end of the stick. I have been playing a 20" floor tom since the mid 80's and thats really rare. I have a 22" Paiste 2002 crash I also ride with the tip of stick for a long sustain ride. I have a 24" ride I stick tip for quick short definition notes but I dont take notes cause I'm sometimes under a rest. I bet nobody has a drum or cymbal setup like me. I play rock,hard rock,heavy metal,blues,pop,boogies, etc with this same setup. Make your own sound and be you neek or a geek like Mongo. lol


View attachment 485288
Those Imperialstars look like my brother's Imperialstars of the early '80s. He has two of every size, including the X-tras, Concert toms, Gongs and Octobans. All in Black. The 26-inch bass drums are killer. More than half of them are still in their boxes! And he's a saxophonist!!
 

Hypercaffium

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2020
Messages
105
Reaction score
73
Location
Rome, Italy
I'm a total beginner, but I've had the same thoughts as the OP more than one time recently.
I play an electronic set and I'd prefer to have a second crash on the right instead of the ride (which I love by the way) because I often find myself in a situations in which you must lead with one crash instead of the hi-hat and use the other as a "bigger" crash.
 

itsjjp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
84
Reaction score
73
Location
New Lenox, IL
Sometimes it would seem so, but like fashion, music is cyclical and evolving. Think back before Alex Van Halen, to the likes of Ringo Starr, Mitch Mitchell, and Keith Moon, to name a few... All three did a fair bit of crash-riding, purposefully coloring the space with a wall of sound. Dave Grohl masterfully used both a well-defined ride as well has crash-rided the hell out of the music that he made with Nirvana. With a lot of 90s bands, it was all hi-hats and crashes, with no defined ride. It really just depends on the music and the drummer's/band's preferences. I play mostly jazz, funk and blues. I like stick definition, and often caution younger players to not give up on it. I encourage them to listen to recordings and decide if what they have and how they're playing it is producing the sound that they want. Many times the answer is no, wow, I didn't realize how washy my ride was!
 

Living Dead Drummer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
87
Reaction score
97
Location
Los Angeles, CA
I remember growing up and thinking that Alex Van Halen's choice of riding on a crash was odd. Fast-forward 30 years and it's become pretty much the SOP for everything hard rock.

It's been almost 8 years since I've used a bona-fide ride in a rock setting. Band leaders prefer that I bash away on the crash, otherwise it "loses energy".

Thoughts?
I have absolutely noticed a large lack of Ride in modern music. It’s all Hats and Crash.
I think a big contributor to this is the fact that so much music is programed now.
much of what I do as a session drummer is replicate, or at least use what someone programed as a base for what I have to either record or perform live. Sadly it often leaves my Ride cymbals Collecting dust.
I do try to go out of my way and sneak it in, and thankfully have subconsciously developed a “signature thing” in my playing where I’ll often smack a Ride Bell on an up beat during a fill, and people seem to really dig that.
To the point where I’m beginning to get requests from producers and artists to include my “thing” in their songs.

A fair amount of my work has always been with Industrial bands, and a lot of the time I don’t even bring a Ride on tour for them :(
 

karlcrafton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
110
Reaction score
110
Location
Detroit, MI
I've used everything as a "multi" for a few decades now.

Other than a few specific applications, I haven't been a player of a "pingy" or dry-ish type of ride cymbal.

In my main band, I just don't even use a ride anymore.

The tone of the guitars and the writing style don't need a "ting ting ting" type ride (or lots of bell), and when recorded--being that I don't really care for the ting ting ting kind of ride-- my slightly washier "ride" never really cuts through (like a drummer would want) the tone of the music.
Even the 24" AVH 2002 Big Ride ended up being more of a blend,
and "part of the total sound" when everything was mixed, so I just decided to not even have a "ride" cymbal in my set up.
 

Jasondog3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
94
Reaction score
11
Location
Boston
I started off using a 20" Ride by Sabian when I was in high school. But I soon switched to a Zildjian 18" Crash-Ride, and I use that mostly as a ride. I like it's brighter and less-pingy sound as a ride. When used as a crash, it's big sounding but not huge, and I don't hit it too hard.

In this picture, I have a 15" Fast-Crash to my left, the 18" Crash-Ride to my right, and 14" Fast-Crash to my far right.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

drumstuff66

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
533
Reaction score
406
Location
Framingham, MA
It really just depends on the music and the drummer's/band's preferences.
In my main band, I just don't even use a ride anymore.

The tone of the guitars and the writing style don't need a "ting ting ting" type ride (or lots of bell)
The guitarist in my main band prefers no ride, especially during solos. The cover band I gig with sometimes requires one, but the singer prefers I not play it while he's singing. Both feel it can get in the way sonically at times.
 

Parcel

Member
Joined
May 12, 2019
Messages
17
Reaction score
4
I remember growing up and thinking that Alex Van Halen's choice of riding on a crash was odd. Fast-forward 30 years and it's become pretty much the SOP for everything hard rock.

It's been almost 8 years since I've used a bona-fide ride in a rock setting. Band leaders prefer that I bash away on the crash, otherwise it "loses energy".

Thoughts?
My last acoustic kit had Pearl 900 Wild 22" ride, 20" Zanki power Crashes an set of Hi hats(cant remember the make)..
 

Masecar

Active Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
49
Location
Raleigh, NC
Modern metal still uses the ride cymbal a lot. The new Gojira single has extensive syncopated ride cymbal use from Mario, as is his style. Opeth have become less deathy over time, to the point where their last record has been compared primarily to 70s prog bands, but have always featured a lot of ride cymbal work.

Indie rock uses relentless Mersey beat ride cymbal in my home town. You should have heard the ping ride I heard in this ballad on the college radio station the other day... egregious.

I don't really concern myself with what's on the "rock" charts these days; half of the time it's stuff like Imagine Dragons, which I consider to be pop and little else, so I just don't care anymore.

Country music still has some common ride cymbal use. In cover gigs, country has required the most use of my heaviest rides, which are still about medium weight. Stuff like Big Green Tractor.
 

Tom Holder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
117
Reaction score
90
Location
SF Bay Area
I just try my best to "service the song". This has been my approach since day-one and this attitude has served me well. If the music calls for a ride cymbal, bring one! I've never been one to ride on crash cymbals. Too noisy, not my thing. If a band leader ever told me to "push the band" with a lot of crash cymbal racket, I would find someone else to play with. Recently, I've found myself using brushes more and I dig the subtlety. I like Blastix a lot, too. I can afford to play with whom I like, and play music that I enjoy. I'm very lucky. John Bonham has already been here and done his thing. I'll never be as good as Bonham, so I just play the styles of music that I enjoy. I'm 64 years old and still get a lot of calls. Bash away, you youngsters and have a ball. It's your turn now. When I was young, I used to LOVE listening to "The Who". "Who's Next" was probably my favorite rock record, in it's time. Nobody ever beat up a drum set quite like Keith Moon. "My Wife" is one of the most expressive examples of rock drumming ever.
 


Top