Is the ride cymbal dying in modern rock music?

Demonslayer

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
463
Reaction score
132
Location
San Sebastian, PR
Oh, absolutely! I wasn't responding to you -- your post made sense. I was responding to the person calling us out for not mentioning "swing". Because modern rock music is definitely known for how much it swings ;)
I appreciate @bpaluzzi 's input quite a bit.

I've been trying to avoid this conversation, but it keeps coming at me one way or the other, so I'm just going to come out and say it:

No one wants to take away your ride.

I get it that rides are somewhat of a sacred cow around here, but some responses to this post have been pretty visceral, defensive, and just not cool.

In my case, it's been two gigs in a row where the artist is asking for things to be played a certain way. I don't think my feelings about any particular piece of equipment are worth losing the artist's confidence in my abilities to interpret their music they way they see fit. It's not my music, so waxing philosophical about my sound sounds petty.

There. Have at it again.
 
Last edited:

WesChilton

Active Member
Joined
May 20, 2020
Messages
42
Reaction score
70
To give a bit of a long perspective... I've been playing and recording in and out of the music biz since the late 1970s. Bottom line... styles change, fads come and go and everything seems to come around again. Look at kits from the 50s and 60s then look at the 70s and 80s. HUGE change. Three piece kits in small sizes with two maybe three cymbals gave way to massive power toms, double bass drums and 5, 6, 7 or 20 cymbals. In the 90s there was fusion, grunge and drummers started using multiple snares, double bass drum pedals and electronics galore...

And then in the 2000s everything started to go the other direction, getting smaller, simplifying... and now, 20 years later, everyone is falling all over themselves, paying thousands of quatloos to get back the old, dead sounding plastic wrapped kits we were literally throwing away in the late 70s.

Everything changes, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. I have my own opinions about the way music has evolved, but I'm not super worked up about it because I know whatever is going on now wont last. Change is inevitable, no matter how much the industry doesn't want it to.

So maybe the sort of "rock" music being made today doesn't have a lot of ride in it... things will change in another 5-10 years and rides could be all over the place again.

I agree with the post above... I have done a several of sessions in the last couple of years where I was asked not to play a ride, or to play a very washy, crash-ride or hihat part in the chorus. But I have also done two rock recordings last year where I did play a ride in a more traditional rock way (whatever that means). So, what I'm seeing is that the ride is still being used when producers and songwriters think its the right instrument to play. Sometimes a producer or artist will have very specific ideas about the drum part and other times they wont, which means I can try a ride if I want to, and then they can decide if they like it. it helps having a few different sounding rides (or any other cymbals) to find a best fit for the song.
 

Corbin L Douthitt

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2018
Messages
135
Reaction score
60
Location
Texas
Only Dads use Rides
Only Dads know what they are for.
IMHO - rides provide undertones FOR the music. If the ‘music’ doesn’t need it, don’t play it. For a while, the big time R&R guys chose cymbals for the bell tone. It’s what they ‘rode’. Maybe crash on the edge of the cymbal. I hear too much bashing and banging and breaking sticks, cracking cymbals and complaints that the snare won’t stay tuned. Couldn’t be from bashing and slamming rim shots? The good drumming I see- new bands on some late night shows- bass, snare, hats. Steady beat. Steady groove. Seldom any dynamics. But the engineer can use the volume slide to control that. .
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
4
Just for fun, I did a quick study of some of the records I’ve dug in the last decade and created a short playlist with current bands/artists with songs still using rides. I tried to pick ones typically younger than me (47), have records in the last few years and don’t necessarily have a history that spans multiple decades. Some are very well known, some are well respected indie bands and some are just young bands but most are regulars on satellite radio. Several have come out more recently too. See what you think:

 

Demonslayer

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
463
Reaction score
132
Location
San Sebastian, PR
Just for fun, I did a quick study of some of the records I’ve dug in the last decade and created a short playlist with current bands/artists with songs still using rides. I tried to pick ones typically younger than me (47), have records in the last few years and don’t necessarily have a history that spans multiple decades. Some are very well known, some are well respected indie bands and some are just young bands but most are regulars on satellite radio. Several have come out more recently too. See what you think:

This is outstanding
 


Top